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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive


Showing stories 201-225 out of 504 stories.
<< < 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 > >>


28-Mar-2006
PPPL developes internet-based simulation capabilities
Physicists at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory are developing internet-based interfaces which will allow researchers to access powerful simulation tools used to interpret experimental data and predict plasma behavior in future experiments.

Contact: Anthony R. DeMeo
ademeo@pppl.gov
609-243-2755
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

26-Jan-2006
NOvA: A neutrino appearance experiment
Deep in the woods of Minnesota, close to the Canadian border, particle physicists hope to construct the next neutrino experiment on a secluded piece of land, fit for studying a lightweight particle that was, itself, once ignored.

Contact: Kendra Snyder
630-840-5681
DOE/Ames Laboratory

6-Jan-2006
The search for extra dimensions
Although we now think of the universe as three bulky, nearly-flat dimensions, we might soon discover that the fabric of space-time consists of many more dimensions than we ever dreamed.

Contact: Kelen Tuttle
650-926-2585
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

20-Dec-2005
The sky's the limit
Earth's climate is noticeably changing over time. Glaciers are smaller, droughts last longer, and extreme weather events like fires, floods and hurricanes occur more frequently. PNNL researchers involved in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program are working to understand these phenomena through improved cloud representations in the computer models that simulate changes in the earth's climate.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

20-Dec-2005
Innovative tools for high-performance computing
Solving complex scientific problems requires not only advanced high-performance supercomputers but also innovative software programs that can discover patterns and integrate data across different space and time scales. Researchers at PNNL are creating innovative software and processes to do just that.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

9-Nov-2005
A limitless potential
Researchers believe carbon nanotubes may prove to be the most promising nanoscale materials for multifunctional applications. These hollow tubes of carbon often have multiple, concentric layers of carbon sheets, like rings of a tree. A single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT)--one sheet of carbon atoms rolled into a tube--has special properties resulting from a structure much more like that of a one-dimensional molecule than bulk graphite.

Contact: Carolyn H. Krause
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

9-Nov-2005
A new attraction
Jian Shen, a recipient of the Presidential Early Career Award in Science and Technology in 2004, is a research theme leader at the Department of Energy's Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences. Many predict that Shen's novel techniques for growing and studying magnetic nanostructures will attract a growing number of guest scientists to ORNL's new nanocenter.

Contact: Carolyn H. Krause
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

9-Nov-2005
Biological tubes to serve as miniature drug capsules
By mixing two common cell ingredients, scientists have assembled tiny hollow tubes whose ends can be open or closed, giving them great potential to serve as drug capsules thousands of times thinner than a human hair, but still 10 times wider than a gene.

Contact: The Interaction Point
tip@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

12-Oct-2005
Super-fast super-sensitive detectors
Only detectors with the greatest precision capabilities will measure up to the machine seeking to explore supersymmetry, dark matter, the Higgs mechanism, and new physics that hasn't yet been imagined. Their shapes and configurations might be familiar, but their inner workings–the materials and electronics charged with creating views of new physics–will carry a symbolic branding: "Product of the 21st century."

Contact: Symmetry
info@symmetrymagazine.org
630-840-3351
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

22-Aug-2005
A random walk through time and space
IN 1905, Albert Einstein published five papers that shook the world of physics. His elegant arguments and conclusions were marvels of physical intuition that addressed dilemmas raised by experimental evidence.

Contact: Science & Technology
str-mail@llnl.gov
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

19-Aug-2005
Finding the next small thing
ORNL "nanoscopes" are among the tools that may help researchers construct materials as elastic and durable as a butterfly's wing.

Contact: Carolyn H. Krause
202-362-6211
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

19-Aug-2005
The compact linear collider
As the Global Design Effort for the proposed International Linear Collider starts to take shape, an international collaboration of scientists simultaneously works on an alternative linear collider technology that pushes physics and engineering to the edge.

Contact: Symmetry
info@symmetrymagazine.org
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

8-Jul-2005
Pushing the boundaries of high-temperature superconductors
A collaboration led by scientists at BNL has revealed a new mechanism that explains why adding calcium to a high-temperature superconductor increases its current-carrying capacity.

Contact: Bulletin Editor
bulletin@bnl.gov
631-344-2345
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

24-Jun-2005
Livermore supercomputers boost scientific progress
Scientists at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and elsewhere increasingly are turning to sophisticated, three-dimensional supercomputer simulations to suggest and verify their theories and to design, complement and sometimes replace experiments.

Contact: Charlie Osolin
osolin1@llnl.gov
925-422-8367
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

16-May-2005
Russian government honors PNNL staff for 10 years of service
Ten-year nuclear safety program wraps up with many improvements in the former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe.

Contact: Kathy Bryson
staci.maloof@pnl.gov
509-372-6313
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

5-May-2005
Do black holes exist? Or are they really 'dark energy stars'?
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory physicist George Chapline says that black holes do not really exist. Instead, he proposes that the mass of compact astrophysical objects consists of the same dark energy that makes up 60 percent of the mass of the universe.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

20-Apr-2005
PPPL-led team completes work on JET alpha detector
Studying the behavior of alpha particles produced in fusion plasmas is of paramount importance for ITER and other advanced fusion devices in which these particles are expected to be the predominant source of plasma heating. An international team led by PPPL physicist Doug Darrow recently completed work at PPPL on the construction of diagnostic equipment that will be used to measure alpha particles and other energetic particles ejected from the plasma in the Joint European Torus (JET) in Culham, England.

Contact: Anthony R. DeMeo
ademeo@pppl.gov
609-243-2755
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

20-Apr-2005
Small is big for PPPL's Paul Trap
The Paul Trap Experiment at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory is trying to determine the properties of intense charge particle beams as they travel through transport systems. But PTSX, measuring only three meters in length -- much shorter than a typical particle accelerator -- uses some interesting physics to simulate the conditions in an accelerator.

Contact: Anthony R. DeMeo
ademeo@pppl.gov
609-243-2755
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

20-Apr-2005
MRI experiment operational at PPPL
The formation process of stars and planets remains one of the big questions in astrophysical science. Currently, scientists do not understand the required conditions and the accretion, or matter collection process, involved in star and planet formation. But the Magnetorotaional Instability (MRI) experiment now operational at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory may shed light on this mystery.

Contact: Anthony R. DeMeo
ademeo@pppl.gov
609-243-2755
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

5-Apr-2005
Greater security with EM coil
An electromagnetic coil system developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory adds truth serum to treaty verification by narrowing the uncertainty for what's inside a sealed container.

Contact: Virginia Sliman
virginia.sliman@pnl.gov
509-375-4372
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

5-Apr-2005
Recycling a legacy of the Cold War
The tons of surplus plutonium stockpiled in the United States and the former Soviet Union are no longer of interest to anyone...except perhaps terrorists. This realization led to an agreement between the United States and the Russian Federation to dispose of 35 metric tons of plutonium each by removing the plutonium "pits" from the nuclear weapons and turning them into nuclear power plant fuel.

Contact: Virginia Sliman
virginia.sliman@pnl.gov
509-375-4372
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Mar-2005
Gamma-ray bursts shower the universe with metals
According to the results from a Livermore computer model, some of the small change jingling in your pocket contains zinc and copper created in massive gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) that rank as the most impressive light shows in the universe.

Contact: Jason Pruet
pruet1@llnl.gov
925-422-5850
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

24-Mar-2005
Enhanced national security through international research collaborations
National security today requires broad and effective engagement in the international arena.

Contact: Science & Technology Review
str-mail@llnl.gov
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

9-Mar-2005
More power to the GRID
On August 16, 2004, a year and two days after the largest power blackout in U.S. history, 3M announced the first commercial sale of an advanced conductor for overhead power lines.

Contact: ORNL Review
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

9-Mar-2005
Industrial efficiency
Improving the efficiency of manufacturing processes is an important component of ORNL's energy mission. Over the years Oak Ridge materials researchers have pursued this goal for a variety of industries through the Department of Energy's Industrial Technologies Program (ITP).

Contact: ORNL Review
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Showing stories 201-225 out of 504 stories.
<< < 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 > >>


 

 

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