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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive

Showing stories 201-225 out of 481 stories.
<< < 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 > >>

9-Mar-2005
More power to the GRID
On August 16, 2004, a year and two days after the largest power blackout in U.S. history, 3M announced the first commercial sale of an advanced conductor for overhead power lines.

Contact: ORNL Review
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

9-Mar-2005
Industrial efficiency
Improving the efficiency of manufacturing processes is an important component of ORNL's energy mission. Over the years Oak Ridge materials researchers have pursued this goal for a variety of industries through the Department of Energy's Industrial Technologies Program (ITP).

Contact: ORNL Review
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

8-Mar-2005
Letting the sunshine in
The outlook is sunny for the Laboratory's prospects of commercializing hybrid solar lighting (HSL). The ORNL technology uses sunlight to reduce the need for indoor electric lighting, the largest consumer of electricity in commercial buildings.

Contact: ORNL Review
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

8-Mar-2005
Pushing the envelope
If ORNL's Jeff Christian could have his way, next-generation houses in East Tennessee would generate as much electricity as they consume.

Contact: ORNL Review
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

4-Mar-2005
Closer to the customer
Without warning, the August 14, 2003, power blackout removed electricity for millions of people in the United States and Canada. The next day manufacturers still had no power, contributing to an estimated cost to the U.S. economy of $6 billion.

Contact: ORNL Review
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

4-Mar-2005
Multiple roads to the hydrogen car
In his 2003 State of the Union address, President George Bush communicated an ambitious vision that the United States will lead the world in developing clean, hydrogen-powered automobiles.

Contact: ORNL Review
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

4-Mar-2005
Aid for the auto industry
Since the 1970s the U.S. government has supported research and development designed to help Americans use energy more efficiently. Because a large portion of American oil imports is used for transportation, the Department of Energy makes substantial investments at ORNL in several technologies designed both to improve fuel efficiency and reduce carbon emissions into the atmosphere.

Contact: ORNL Review
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

4-Mar-2005
Energy prophets: US oil dependence
U.S. oil imports are at an all-time high, accounting for approximately 57% of domestic consumption. Americans today import some 12 million barrels per day at a cost that in 2004 skyrocketed above $50 a barrel.

Contact: ORNL Review
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

4-Mar-2005
Providing international solutions
As U.S. researchers focus on domestic energy issues, they could easily miss the century's dominant energy challenge: to increase energy supplies for the world's growing population without contributing further to environmental degradation. Accomplishing this monumental task would represent the most fundamental change in the world's energy production since the Industrial Revolution.

Contact: ORNL Review
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

4-Mar-2005
Energy efficiency: Stretching America's resources
The United States and the world face enormous energy challenges. Petroleum prices are at record highs with no end in sight. The emergence of China and India as major contributors to global demand brings new urgency to political and economic concerns about oil dependence.

Contact: ORNL Review
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

28-Feb-2005
Cosmic tune-up: Cosmic rays help prime BABAR systems
Cosmic rays harmlessly stream through everything on Earth--our bodies, the scintillator counters in the Visitor's Center and the BaBar detectors.

Contact: The Interaction Point
webmaster@slac.gov
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

22-Feb-2005
NuSTAR satellite approved for further study by NASA
The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) satellite may soon give astrophysicists a new window on the universe. Designed to image high-energy X-ray radiation, it will capture sharp images of black holes, supernovae, and galactic nuclei. And if NASA gives the project final flight approval early next year, it could be in orbit by the end of the decade.

Contact: The Interaction Point
tip@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

17-Feb-2005
Pacific Northwest lab forms Institute for Interfacial Catalysis, names director
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory today launched an $8 million Institute for Interfacial Catalysis to explore the fundamental chemical changes on surfaces where catalytic reactions take place. The Department of Energy lab also announced the appointment of University of Texas at Austin chemist John M. "Mike" White as the institute's director.

Contact: cannon@pnl.gov
cannon@pnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

10-Feb-2005
'Quantum Diaries' reveal the secret lives of modern physicists
What is it like to be a physicist 100 years after Einstein pushed physics to a new frontier? A new website featuring researchers at Stanford and around the globe is helping answer that question by cataloging the daily lives of more than 25 physicists. Quantum Diaries celebrates the World Year of Physics by recording the experiences, thoughts, impressions, triumphs and disappointments of these men and women in their blogs, or web-based logs.

Contact: Neil Calder
Neil.Calder@SLAC.Stanford.edu
650-926-8707
DOE/Ames Laboratory

9-Feb-2005
Beyond the standard model
At almost any particle physics conference, meeting, or lunch table, the phrase "physics beyond the Standard Model" is heard over and over again. What's wrong with the Standard Model, anyway? Why are physicists so sure that there is something beyond it? And why do they think they can find it anytime soon?

Contact: John Womersley
fermilab@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

9-Feb-2005
Let it rain
Toward the end of a ten-year experiment in 1991, postdoc Hungye Dai of the University of Utah was puzzling over some really unusual data. The experiment was Fly's Eye, which pioneered a new method of studying ultra-high-energy cosmic rays by monitoring the faint flashes of ultraviolet light produced in the sky when the particles hit the upper atmosphere.

Contact: Davide Castelvecchi
fermilab@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

9-Feb-2005
Sold on cold
One hot day in August, particle physicists turned cold. That's the day the International Technology Recommendation Panel (ITRP) announced the decision to pursue "cold" superconducting technology for what physicists hope will be the world's next big particle accelerator, the International Linear Collider. Going cold, instead of recommending a "warm" option that had also been under development, has far-reaching consequences for laboratories, scientists, industries and governments across the globe. What does "cold" mean, and why did particle physics choose superconducting technology?

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

9-Feb-2005
Extreme neutrinos
Kurt Woschnagg has been waiting nine days to catch a plane to the South Pole. He flew for 15 hours from San Francisco to New Zealand, waited several days to spend another eight hours in a cargo plane to McMurdo Station in Antarctica, only to wait again for the weather to clear.

Contact: Katie Yurkewicz
fermilab@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

9-Feb-2005
The growth of inflation
It was a true Eureka moment if there ever was one. On the night of December 6, 1979, an obscure Stanford Linear Accelerator Center postdoc was up late, sweating over an even more obscure problem about particles called magnetic monopoles. Looking at his calculations the next day, the usually low-key Alan Guth annotated the words "Spectacular Realization" at the top of the page. Guth had discovered cosmic inflation, an idea which some have later called the most important in cosmology since the big bang.

Contact: Davide Castelvecchi
fermilab@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

4-Feb-2005
First GLAST tracker arrives at SLAC
The Gamma Ray Large Area Telescope (GLAST) satellite project celebrated a milestone last month with the arrival of the first tracker module at SLAC.

Contact: The Interaction Point
tip@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

2-Feb-2005
Virtual goes reality for Microproducts Breakthrough Institute
What has been a virtual institute between Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Oregon State University College of Engineering in essence will go "live" today as Dennis Stiles becomes the PNNL program manager for the Microproducts Breakthrough Institute at the Corvallis, Ore. facility.

Contact: Geoffrey Harvey
geoffrey.harvey@pnl.gov
509-372-6083
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

22-Dec-2004
Effective model of the atom gets more realistic
A new paper provides the first tool for describing the nucleus in terms of the most basic building blocks of everyday matter: quarks and gluons.

Contact: Linda Ware
ware@jlab.org
757-269-7689
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

22-Dec-2004
New high precision experiment for Jefferson Lab
HYCAL, Jefferson Lab's newest detector took three years to design and build and will be put to the testmaking high precision measurements of the lifetime of the pion particle. This experiment could tell scientists more about symmetry in nature.

Contact: Linda Ware
ware@jlab.org
757-269-7689
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

20-Dec-2004
X rays, detonations, and dead zones
The rapid, violent detonation of a high explosive (HE) generates supersonic shock waves that transfer energy by moving mass. According to Livermore physicist John Molitoris, trying to gather data on what happens to a material during this split second is often a case of "smoke and mirrors."

Contact: John Molitoris
molitoris1@llnl.gov
925-423-3496
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

20-Dec-2004
The Art of protein structure prediction
From hemoglobin that carries oxygen, to enzymes and hormones that turn cells on and off, to antibodies that fight infection, proteins seem to do it all.

Contact: Krzysztof Fidelis
fidelis1@llnl.gov
925-423-4752
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Showing stories 201-225 out of 481 stories.
<< < 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 > >>

 

 

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