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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive

Showing stories 201-225 out of 459 stories.
<< < 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 > >>

22-Dec-2004
New high precision experiment for Jefferson Lab
HYCAL, Jefferson Lab's newest detector took three years to design and build and will be put to the testmaking high precision measurements of the lifetime of the pion particle. This experiment could tell scientists more about symmetry in nature.

Contact: Linda Ware
ware@jlab.org
757-269-7689
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

20-Dec-2004
X rays, detonations, and dead zones
The rapid, violent detonation of a high explosive (HE) generates supersonic shock waves that transfer energy by moving mass. According to Livermore physicist John Molitoris, trying to gather data on what happens to a material during this split second is often a case of "smoke and mirrors."

Contact: John Molitoris
molitoris1@llnl.gov
925-423-3496
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

20-Dec-2004
The Art of protein structure prediction
From hemoglobin that carries oxygen, to enzymes and hormones that turn cells on and off, to antibodies that fight infection, proteins seem to do it all.

Contact: Krzysztof Fidelis
fidelis1@llnl.gov
925-423-4752
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

20-Dec-2004
Putting the squeeze on materials
Few gemstones are as mesmerizing as diamonds. Livermore physicists also find diamonds attractive but for reasons other than their beauty. The researchers use flawless, polished diamonds in opposing pairs, or anvils, to slowly compress samples of materials at extreme pressures.

Contact: Samuel Weir
weir3@llnl.gov
925-422-2462
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

20-Dec-2004
It's all in motion when simulating fluids
WHETHER it's the mechanics of a supernova, the ignition of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsule, or the detonation of a nuclear weapon, simulating the motion of fluids is anything but simple. Every piece of the model is moving. Fluids interact with each other and with solid materials, plus those interactions occur quickly and at intense pressures and temperatures.

Contact: Jim Rathkopf
rathkopf@llnl.gov
925-422-4602
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

20-Dec-2004
High tech lab gets a high tech control room
Jefferson Lab's nerve center, the Machine Control Center, has been transformed into a state-of-the-art, technologically advanced and ergonomically sound control room ready to meet the challenges of a demanding user community

Contact: Linda Ware
ware@jlab.org
757-269-7689
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

10-Dec-2004
Fastest gun in the West
SLAC partnered with CalTech, Fermilab, CERN and the University of Florida, along with groups from the UK, Brazil and Korea to defend its title as one of the fastest guns in the West--or, more accurately, the largest bandwidth, which is the computing equivalent.

Contact: SLAC
tip@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

1-Dec-2004
Big project reveals secrets of tiny materials
A big project studying the characteristics of the very small will provide insight into new materials with unprecedented properties. These small systems can be only a few atoms wide and are measured in billionths of meters, or nanometers.

Contact: Rich Greb
rgreb@anl.gov
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

10-Nov-2004
Neutron-rich mecca for biologists
Biologists can image proteins using electron and atomic force microscopes. They can visualize the three-dimensional structure of proteins--amino-acid sequences folded in complicated ways--by using X rays at ORNL and other DOE labs.

Contact: ORNL Review
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Nov-2004
Magnetically levitated train takes flight
SINCE the 1960s, transportation industry planners have sought an energy-efficient design for a train that can glide through air at speeds up to 500 kilometers per hour.

Contact: Richard Post
post3@llnl.gov
925-422-9853
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

15-Oct-2004
Quenching marital bliss
Niobium, mined in Brazil, needs to be exquisitely purified. It is one of 26 metals in the periodic table with natural superconducting properties.

Contact: Interaction Point
tip@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

15-Oct-2004
When it comes to accelerators, what is cold?
Superconductivity arises in special materials at super cold temperatures. At these temperatures--a few degrees above absolute zero--the materials' electrical resistance virtually vanishes.

Contact: Interaction Point
tip@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

16-Sep-2004
Researchers 'redesigning' platinum
Researchers have developed a way of changing the properties of platinum by manipulating the metal at the nanoscale. The method mimics the action of photosynthetic proteins.

Contact: Chris Burroughs
coburro@sandia.gov
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

16-Sep-2004
Cold Molecules - New avenue to the 5th phase of matter
Using a method usually more suitable to billiards than atomic physics, researchers from Sandia and Columbia University have created extremely cold molecules that could be used as an improved first step in creating molecular Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs).

Contact: Neal Singer
nsinger@sandia.gov
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

16-Sep-2004
Exploring the ultrawideband
Lawrence Livermore research efforts and inventions quietly advance many fields. In one instance, however, a Livermore invention that stemmed from laser research has spawned a variety of new commercial products, including some that support national and homeland security.

Contact: Steve Azevedo
azevedo3@lln.gov
925-422-8538
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

16-Sep-2004
SPEAR3 project wins DOE award for excellence
On August 13, Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham presented the Secretary's Excellence in Acquisition Award to the SPEAR3 Management team in a ceremony at the DOE headquarters in Washington, DC. The Fourth Annual DOE Project Management Awards pay tribute to those teams or individuals who have achieved outstanding results through resourceful, innovative thinking and implementation.

Contact: Interaction Point
tip@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/US Department of Energy

1-Sep-2004
'Nanotractor' studies micro-scale friction
Interest in the development of MEMS (microelectromechanical systems) has grown steadily during the past decade. These tiny devices, now used in such applications as auto airbag systems, inkjet printers, and display units, are attractive because they take up little space and require little or no assembly. They also are cheap to produce in batch quantities because they are made with a technology that is already mature -- the microlithography used to make silicon chips.

Contact: Michael Padilla
mjpadil@sandia.gov
505-844-9509
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

1-Sep-2004
'Nanotools' - Self-assembling durable nanocrystal arrays
A wish list for nanotechnologists would likely include a simple, inexpensive means of self-assembling nanocrystals into robust, orderly arrangements, like soup cans on a shelf or bricks in a wall, each separated from the next by an insulating layer of silicon dioxide.

Contact: Neal Singer
nsinger@sandia.gov
505-845-7078
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

24-Aug-2004
Fine-tuning carbon nanotubes
Since their discovery in the 1990s, carbon nanotubes have ensnared the imagination of chemists. Among them are researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory who are putting these fine filaments--ten-thousand times smaller than a hair--to work as biosensors and improving the way carbon nanotubes can be chemically customized to form the basis for a wide variety of devices.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

24-Aug-2004
Supercritical fluidsŚmaking nanoparticles easy
It's not a liquid. It's not a gas. It's a supercritical fluid. Although it looks like a liquid, it has unique properties that allow scientists to work with it in ways they can't with liquids. Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are using supercritical fluids as solvents in a process that creates nanoparticles.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

24-Aug-2004
From cosmetics to hydrogen storageŚnanoscale materials push the frontier
Suresh Baskaran develops new projects in advanced materials and manufacturing technology. This includes materials and manufacturing technology for new applications in electronics, photonics, energy conversion, vehicular structures, sensors and emissions control.

Contact: PNNL Webmaster
webmaster@pnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

11-Aug-2004
Progress through computation
If we continue to burn fossil fuels for energy at the current rate, they will last only another few hundred years. In the context of civilization, the fossil fuel era is drawing to a close. In addition, it would be wise to reduce our combustion of oil, gas, and coal because the process produces pollutants that are bad for our health and carbon dioxide that could change our climate in undesirable ways. One possible future source of electricity for the world is fusion energy.

Contact: Carolyn Krause
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

11-Aug-2004
Shedding light on luminosity
What on earth is an inverse femtobarn and what does it have to do with the number of events an accelerator produces?Fittingly, it was in the farmlands of the Midwest that the term 'barn' was first applied to physics. In December 1942, at a dinner on the campus of Purdue University, physicists M. G. Holloway and C. P. Parker were lamenting the lack of a catchy name for discussing the size of an atomic nucleus.

Contact: SLAC editorial
tips@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

10-Aug-2004
New research facility holds promise for nation's energy future
Ground was broken July 27 on a new facility at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), designed to increase collaboration among researchers and speed the time it takes for new technologies to move from the laboratory bench to commercial manufacturing.

Contact: Gary Schmitz
gary_schmitz@nrel.gov
303-275-4050
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

1-Aug-2004
Exploring and modeling 21st Century materials
The 1986 discovery of high-temperature superconductivity sparked the quest for room-temperature superconductors that could transmit electrical current without heat losses and without the need for an expensive coolant such as liquid helium. Room-temperature superconductors could make possible ultra-efficient power transmission lines, practical electric cars, and superconducting magnets that could bring high-speed levitated trains and smaller, more efficient, and less costly rotating machinery, appliances, particle accelerators, electric generators, and medical imaging devices.

Contact: Carolyn Krause
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Showing stories 201-225 out of 459 stories.
<< < 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 > >>

 

 

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