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Features Archive

Showing stories 201-225 out of 489 stories.
<< < 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 > >>

5-May-2005
Do black holes exist? Or are they really 'dark energy stars'?
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory physicist George Chapline says that black holes do not really exist. Instead, he proposes that the mass of compact astrophysical objects consists of the same dark energy that makes up 60 percent of the mass of the universe.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

20-Apr-2005
PPPL-led team completes work on JET alpha detector
Studying the behavior of alpha particles produced in fusion plasmas is of paramount importance for ITER and other advanced fusion devices in which these particles are expected to be the predominant source of plasma heating. An international team led by PPPL physicist Doug Darrow recently completed work at PPPL on the construction of diagnostic equipment that will be used to measure alpha particles and other energetic particles ejected from the plasma in the Joint European Torus (JET) in Culham, England.

Contact: Anthony R. DeMeo
ademeo@pppl.gov
609-243-2755
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

20-Apr-2005
Small is big for PPPL's Paul Trap
The Paul Trap Experiment at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory is trying to determine the properties of intense charge particle beams as they travel through transport systems. But PTSX, measuring only three meters in length -- much shorter than a typical particle accelerator -- uses some interesting physics to simulate the conditions in an accelerator.

Contact: Anthony R. DeMeo
ademeo@pppl.gov
609-243-2755
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

20-Apr-2005
MRI experiment operational at PPPL
The formation process of stars and planets remains one of the big questions in astrophysical science. Currently, scientists do not understand the required conditions and the accretion, or matter collection process, involved in star and planet formation. But the Magnetorotaional Instability (MRI) experiment now operational at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory may shed light on this mystery.

Contact: Anthony R. DeMeo
ademeo@pppl.gov
609-243-2755
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

5-Apr-2005
Greater security with EM coil
An electromagnetic coil system developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory adds truth serum to treaty verification by narrowing the uncertainty for what's inside a sealed container.

Contact: Virginia Sliman
virginia.sliman@pnl.gov
509-375-4372
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

5-Apr-2005
Recycling a legacy of the Cold War
The tons of surplus plutonium stockpiled in the United States and the former Soviet Union are no longer of interest to anyone...except perhaps terrorists. This realization led to an agreement between the United States and the Russian Federation to dispose of 35 metric tons of plutonium each by removing the plutonium "pits" from the nuclear weapons and turning them into nuclear power plant fuel.

Contact: Virginia Sliman
virginia.sliman@pnl.gov
509-375-4372
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Mar-2005
Gamma-ray bursts shower the universe with metals
According to the results from a Livermore computer model, some of the small change jingling in your pocket contains zinc and copper created in massive gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) that rank as the most impressive light shows in the universe.

Contact: Jason Pruet
pruet1@llnl.gov
925-422-5850
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

24-Mar-2005
Enhanced national security through international research collaborations
National security today requires broad and effective engagement in the international arena.

Contact: Science & Technology Review
str-mail@llnl.gov
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

9-Mar-2005
More power to the GRID
On August 16, 2004, a year and two days after the largest power blackout in U.S. history, 3M announced the first commercial sale of an advanced conductor for overhead power lines.

Contact: ORNL Review
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

9-Mar-2005
Industrial efficiency
Improving the efficiency of manufacturing processes is an important component of ORNL's energy mission. Over the years Oak Ridge materials researchers have pursued this goal for a variety of industries through the Department of Energy's Industrial Technologies Program (ITP).

Contact: ORNL Review
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

8-Mar-2005
Letting the sunshine in
The outlook is sunny for the Laboratory's prospects of commercializing hybrid solar lighting (HSL). The ORNL technology uses sunlight to reduce the need for indoor electric lighting, the largest consumer of electricity in commercial buildings.

Contact: ORNL Review
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

8-Mar-2005
Pushing the envelope
If ORNL's Jeff Christian could have his way, next-generation houses in East Tennessee would generate as much electricity as they consume.

Contact: ORNL Review
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

4-Mar-2005
Closer to the customer
Without warning, the August 14, 2003, power blackout removed electricity for millions of people in the United States and Canada. The next day manufacturers still had no power, contributing to an estimated cost to the U.S. economy of $6 billion.

Contact: ORNL Review
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

4-Mar-2005
Multiple roads to the hydrogen car
In his 2003 State of the Union address, President George Bush communicated an ambitious vision that the United States will lead the world in developing clean, hydrogen-powered automobiles.

Contact: ORNL Review
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

4-Mar-2005
Aid for the auto industry
Since the 1970s the U.S. government has supported research and development designed to help Americans use energy more efficiently. Because a large portion of American oil imports is used for transportation, the Department of Energy makes substantial investments at ORNL in several technologies designed both to improve fuel efficiency and reduce carbon emissions into the atmosphere.

Contact: ORNL Review
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

4-Mar-2005
Energy prophets: US oil dependence
U.S. oil imports are at an all-time high, accounting for approximately 57% of domestic consumption. Americans today import some 12 million barrels per day at a cost that in 2004 skyrocketed above $50 a barrel.

Contact: ORNL Review
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

4-Mar-2005
Providing international solutions
As U.S. researchers focus on domestic energy issues, they could easily miss the century's dominant energy challenge: to increase energy supplies for the world's growing population without contributing further to environmental degradation. Accomplishing this monumental task would represent the most fundamental change in the world's energy production since the Industrial Revolution.

Contact: ORNL Review
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

4-Mar-2005
Energy efficiency: Stretching America's resources
The United States and the world face enormous energy challenges. Petroleum prices are at record highs with no end in sight. The emergence of China and India as major contributors to global demand brings new urgency to political and economic concerns about oil dependence.

Contact: ORNL Review
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

28-Feb-2005
Cosmic tune-up: Cosmic rays help prime BABAR systems
Cosmic rays harmlessly stream through everything on Earth--our bodies, the scintillator counters in the Visitor's Center and the BaBar detectors.

Contact: The Interaction Point
webmaster@slac.gov
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

22-Feb-2005
NuSTAR satellite approved for further study by NASA
The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) satellite may soon give astrophysicists a new window on the universe. Designed to image high-energy X-ray radiation, it will capture sharp images of black holes, supernovae, and galactic nuclei. And if NASA gives the project final flight approval early next year, it could be in orbit by the end of the decade.

Contact: The Interaction Point
tip@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

17-Feb-2005
Pacific Northwest lab forms Institute for Interfacial Catalysis, names director
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory today launched an $8 million Institute for Interfacial Catalysis to explore the fundamental chemical changes on surfaces where catalytic reactions take place. The Department of Energy lab also announced the appointment of University of Texas at Austin chemist John M. "Mike" White as the institute's director.

Contact: cannon@pnl.gov
cannon@pnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

10-Feb-2005
'Quantum Diaries' reveal the secret lives of modern physicists
What is it like to be a physicist 100 years after Einstein pushed physics to a new frontier? A new website featuring researchers at Stanford and around the globe is helping answer that question by cataloging the daily lives of more than 25 physicists. Quantum Diaries celebrates the World Year of Physics by recording the experiences, thoughts, impressions, triumphs and disappointments of these men and women in their blogs, or web-based logs.

Contact: Neil Calder
Neil.Calder@SLAC.Stanford.edu
650-926-8707
DOE/Ames Laboratory

9-Feb-2005
Beyond the standard model
At almost any particle physics conference, meeting, or lunch table, the phrase "physics beyond the Standard Model" is heard over and over again. What's wrong with the Standard Model, anyway? Why are physicists so sure that there is something beyond it? And why do they think they can find it anytime soon?

Contact: John Womersley
fermilab@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

9-Feb-2005
Let it rain
Toward the end of a ten-year experiment in 1991, postdoc Hungye Dai of the University of Utah was puzzling over some really unusual data. The experiment was Fly's Eye, which pioneered a new method of studying ultra-high-energy cosmic rays by monitoring the faint flashes of ultraviolet light produced in the sky when the particles hit the upper atmosphere.

Contact: Davide Castelvecchi
fermilab@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

9-Feb-2005
Sold on cold
One hot day in August, particle physicists turned cold. That's the day the International Technology Recommendation Panel (ITRP) announced the decision to pursue "cold" superconducting technology for what physicists hope will be the world's next big particle accelerator, the International Linear Collider. Going cold, instead of recommending a "warm" option that had also been under development, has far-reaching consequences for laboratories, scientists, industries and governments across the globe. What does "cold" mean, and why did particle physics choose superconducting technology?

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

Showing stories 201-225 out of 489 stories.
<< < 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 > >>

 

 

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