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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive


Showing stories 26-50 out of 87 stories.
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20-Aug-2014
Ying Diao honored with 2014 Spicer Award for her work at SSRL
Ying Diao, a SLAC/Stanford postdoctoral researcher who brought key innovations to a printing technique for flexible electronics, solar panels and other uses, has been selected to receive this year's William E. and Diane M. Spicer Young Investigator Award.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

18-Aug-2014
Berkeley Lab's SPOT Suite transforms beamline science
For decades, synchrotron light sources have been operating on a manual grab-and-go data management model, but a recent deluge of data is quickly making this practice implausible. So Berkeley Lab X-ray scientists, facility users, computer and computational scientists, teamed up to create new tools for reducing, managing, analyzing and visualizing beamline data.The result of this collaboration is SPOT Suite, and it is already transforming the way scientists run their experiments at the ALS.

Contact: Linda Vu
lvu@lbl.gov
510-495-2402
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

14-Aug-2014
SLAC secures role in energy frontier research center focused on next-generation materials
The Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory will play a key role in a research consortium that seeks out new materials for next-generation solar panels, low-energy lighting and other uses.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

31-Jul-2014
Giant electromagnet completes its journey, moves into its new home at Fermilab
One year ago, the 50-foot-wide Muon g-2 electromagnet arrived at the US Department of Energy's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Illinois after traveling 3,200 miles over land and sea from Long Island, N.Y. This week, the magnet took the final few steps of that journey, moving across the Fermilab site and into the new building that now houses it.

Contact: Andre Salles
media@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

29-Jul-2014
Watching neurons fire from a front-row seat
Sandia National Laboratories is working with Arizona State University on the challenge of recording and measuring signals from the brain.

Contact: Sue Holmes
sholmes@sandia.gov
505-844-6362
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

17-Jul-2014
Hot plasma partial to bootstrap current
Supercomputers at NERSC are helping plasma physicists 'bootstrap' a potentially more affordable and sustainable fusion reaction. If successful, fusion reactors could provide almost limitless clean energy.

Contact: Kathy Kincade
kkincade@lbl.gov
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

16-Jul-2014
Supercomputers reveal strange, stress-induced transformations in world's thinnest materials
Using Brookhaven Lab supercomputers, Columbia University researchers discovered exotic transformations in graphene and other monolayer materials under strain.

Contact: Justin Eure
jeure@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

15-Jul-2014
Ames Laboratory home to first-in-nation DNP-NMR instrument to study materials
The US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory is now the home to a dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer that helps scientists understand how individual atoms are arranged in materials. Ames Laboratory's DNP-NMR is the first to be used for materials science and chemistry in the United States.

Contact: Breehan Gerleman Lucchesi
breehan@ameslab.gov
515-294-9750
DOE/Ames Laboratory

15-Jul-2014
Physicists detect process even rarer than the long-sought Higgs particle
Scientists running the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the world's largest and most powerful 'atom smasher,' report the first evidence of a process that can be used to test the mechanism by which the recently discovered Higgs particle imparts mass to other fundamental particles.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

14-Jul-2014
First anniversary gift for Critical Material Institute? Inventions. Eleven of them.
The Critical Materials Institute, an Energy Innovation Hub for the US Department of Energy, celebrated its first anniversary with 11 invention disclosures, all research milestones in a mission to assure the availability of rare earths and other materials critical to clean energy technologies. The inventions include improved extractive processes, recycling techniques, and substitute materials -- technologies designed to increase production and efficiency of, and reduce reliance on, the use of rare earths and other critical materials.

Contact: Laura Millsaps
millsaps@ameslab.gov
515-294-3474
DOE/Ames Laboratory

8-Jul-2014
Ames Laboratory breaks ground on state-of-the-art instrument facility
The US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory broke ground today on a Sensitive Instrument Facility designed to isolate increasingly fine-tuned scientific equipment from environmental disturbances.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

25-Jun-2014
Massive 30-ton MicroBooNE particle detector moved into place, will see neutrinos this year
On Monday, June 23, the next phase of neutrino physics at Fermilab fell (gently) into place. The MicroBooNE detector -- a 30-ton, 40-foot-long cylindrical metal tank designed to detect ghostly particles called neutrinos -- was carefully transported by truck across the US Department of Energy's Fermilab site, from the warehouse building it was constructed in to the experimental hall three miles away.

Contact: Andre Salles
media@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

25-Jun-2014
A model for success
Idaho National Laboratory researcher Blaise Collin works with software called PARFUME (particle fuel model) as part of an effort to find new, safer fuel sources for use in nuclear reactors.

Contact: Nicole Stricker
nicole.stricker@inl.gov
208-526-5955
DOE/Idaho National Laboratory

17-Jun-2014
Novel nanoparticle production method could lead to better lights, lenses, solar cells
Two Sandia researchers have come up with a way to make titanium-dioxide nanoparticles, which have a variety of uses in everything from solar cells to LEDs. Titanium-dioxide nanoparticles show great promise, but industry has largely shunned them in the past because they've been difficult and expensive to make.

Contact: Sue Holmes
sholmes@sandia.gov
505-844-6362
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

16-Jun-2014
Ames Laboratory scientist hopes to improve rare earth purification process
Using the second fastest supercomputer in the world, a scientist at the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory is attempting to develop a more efficient process for purifying rare-earth materials.

Contact: Breehan Gerleman Lucchesi
breehan@ameslab.gov
515-294-9750
DOE/Ames Laboratory

6-Jun-2014
MINOS result narrows field for sterile neutrinos
A new result from the long-running MINOS experiment announced this week severely limits the area in which sterile neutrinos could be found and casts more doubt on whether they exist at all.

Contact: Kathryn Jepsen
kathryn.jepsen@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

29-May-2014
Scientists pinpoint creeping nanocrystals behind lithium-ion battery degradation
Scientists from several US Department of Energy national laboratories -- Lawrence Berkeley, Brookhaven, SLAC, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory -- mapped the nanoscale dynamics of lithium-ion charge cycles and discovered never-before-seen evolution and degradation patterns in two key battery materials.

Contact: Justin Eure
jeure@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

21-May-2014
Tethys: A robust source of information on marine energy, offshore wind projects
Wondering what the impact on killer whales might be from a turbine installed under the sea? Check out Tethys, a robust online resource available for free to anyone interested in ocean energy and offshore wind resources. Tethys focuses on the environmental effects of energy projects that are proposed, underway or completed in the ocean and above it.

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

12-May-2014
Industry research: Experiment enters next stage at new Idaho hot cell
To the average eye, the experimental specimens don't look like much: silver-colored squares about the size of a domino. But the samples represent several big milestones for Idaho National Laboratory, the Department of Energy and the US nuclear energy industry. The irradiated 'compact tension' specimens are the first to undergo analysis in a specialized test rig at INL. Plus, they're part of a first-of-its-kind collaboration through the DOE's Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility.

Contact: Nicole Stricker
nicole.stricker@inl.gov
208-526-5955
DOE/Idaho National Laboratory

8-May-2014
Scientists to map universe in 3-D HD
In a few years, scientists will come out with a new map of a third of the sky, one that will go deeper and bring that depth into sharper focus than any survey has yet achieved. It will pinpoint in three dimensions the locations of 25 million galaxies and quasars, pulling back the curtains on the history of the universe's expansion over more than half of the age of the universe.

Contact: Kathryn Jepsen
kathryn.jepsen@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

8-May-2014
Engineering better machines and buildings by understanding mechanics of materials
Sandia National Laboratories is working to fill gaps in the fundamental understanding of materials science through an ambitious long-term, multidisciplinary project called Predicting Performance Margins, or PPM. From the atomic level to full-scale components, the research links variability in materials' atomic configurations and microstructures with how actual parts perform.

Contact: Sue Holmes
sholmes@sandia.gov
505-844-6362
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

29-Apr-2014
Label-free, sequence-specific, inexpensive fluorescent DNA sensors
Using principles of energy transfer more commonly applied to designing solar cells, scientists at the US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory have developed a new highly sensitive way to detect specific sequences of DNA, the genetic material unique to every living thing. As described in a paper published in the journal Chemistry of Materials, the method is considerably less costly than other DNA assays and has widespread potential for applications in forensics, medical diagnostics, and the detection of bioterror agents.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

29-Apr-2014
Is the universe balanced on a pinhead?
Scientists have known the mass of the heaviest fundamental particle, the top quark, since 1995. But recent, more precise measurements of this mass have revived an old question: Why is it so huge? No one is sure, but it might be a sign that our universe is inherently unstable. Or it might be a sign that some factor we don't yet understand is keeping us in balance.

Contact: Kathryn Jepsen
kathryn.jepsen@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

25-Apr-2014
'Sweet spot' for salty water
Computational modeling has given materials researchers new insight into the properties of a membrane that purifies saltwater into potable water. The resulting technology could help speed up inefficient desalination processes in use today.

Contact: Morgan McCorkle
mccorkleml@ornl.gov
865-574-7308
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

21-Apr-2014
Computer-assisted accelerator design
Accelerator physicist Stephen Brooks uses custom designed software to create a 3-D virtual model of the electron accelerator Brookhaven physicists hope to build inside the tunnel currently housing the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Showing stories 26-50 out of 87 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>


 

 

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