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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive

Showing stories 276-300 out of 459 stories.
<< < 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 > >>

18-Nov-2003
Longest linac makes the world's shortest electron bunches
Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Stanford Linear Accelerator Center used the world's longest linear accelerator to develop the world's shortest bunches of electrons. Conversion of these bunches into bright, short pulses of X-ray light enables researchers to directly observe atomic motion never seen before in solids and liquids--allowing for instantaneous snapshots of simple chemical reactions in progress.

Contact: Press Office
202-586-5806
DOE/US Department of Energy

1-Nov-2003
Laboratories-on-a-chip foil terrorism
Laboratories-on-a-chip developed at Argonne can detect chemicals, bacteria or viruses that terrorists may use.

Contact: Rich Greb
rgreb@anl.gov
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

1-Nov-2003
Superconducting magnets
When you cool a piece of metal below a critical temperature, something magical happens. The atoms begin passing along electrons with zero resistance. People in the know refer to this rare state as "superconductivity."

Contact: Elizabeth Clements
lizzie@fnal.gov
630-840-2326
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

1-Nov-2003
Twenty years at the energy frontier
The Tevatron began operations in late 1983 when the E715 experiment initiated the use of the world's highest-energy beams. Since then more than forty fixed-target experiments have used Tevatron beams of protons, pions, muons, photons, hyperons and neutrinos to expand our knowledge of particles and forces.

Contact: Elizabeth Clements
lizzie@fnal.gov
630-840-2326
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

1-Oct-2003
Fermilab Today launches Result of the Week
Fermilab's daily online news service, Fermilab Today, launched a new weekly feature on September 18--the Fermilab Result of the Week. Each Thursday, FT will bring readers a new scientific result from ongoing research at Fermilab.

Contact: Elizabeth Clements
lizzie@fnal.gov
630-840-2326
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

1-Oct-2003
Point of view: RUN II
Last month Fermilab Director Mike Witherell announced the cancellation of the CDF and DZero silicon detector upgrades for Run II. While not entirely unexpected, this announcement was a great disappointment to many of us.

Contact: Elizabeth Clements
lizzie@fnal.gov
630-840-2326
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

24-Sep-2003
Supernovae shape up for cosmology
A collaboration among the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, the European Southern Observatory, and the University of Texas has yielded the discovery that Type 1a supernovae do not explode spherically. This discovery marks the first time that the intrinsic polarization of a normal Type 1a supernova has been detected.

Contact: Paul Preuss
paul_preuss@lbl.gov
510-486-6249
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

1-Sep-2003
Lepton Photon 2003: A week of interactions
Each day, they filled Wilson Hall's Ramsey Auditorium--some 800 representatives of long careers and future hopes in the global community of high-energy physics.

Contact: Elizabeth Clements
lizzie@fnal.gov
630-840-2326
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

1-Sep-2003
Startup of MINOS
Scientists of the MINOS collaboration announced the official start of data-taking with the 6,000-ton detector for the Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search on Thursday, August 14. Physicists will use the MINOS detector, located deep in an historic iron mine in northern Minnesota, to explore the phenomenon of neutrino mass.

Contact: Elizabeth Clements
lizzie@fnal.gov
630-840-2326
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

25-Jul-2003
Pentaquark: New evidence of an exotic five-quark particle
Results of an international research collaboration have yielded convincing evidence of a subatomic particle consisting of five quarks. The results of the research--conducted at the U.S. Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility--were announced at the Conference on the Intersections of Particle and Nuclear Physics in May 2003.

Contact: Linda Ware
ware@jlab.org
757-269-7689
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

18-Jul-2003
Energy secretary breaks ground on nation’s first Nanoscale & Nanotechnology Research Facility
The Oak Ridge facility will be the first of five Energy Department centers. The center will be a world-class, one-of-a kind facility for the fabrication and characterization of materials on the nanoscale.

Contact: Jeff Sherwood
jeff.sherwood@hq.doe.gov
202-586-5806
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

11-Jul-2003
From Georgia with innovation: A profile of Jefferson Lab staff scientist Youri Sharabian
By the time he was in 7th grade, Sharabian had built a small workshop in his family's basement. When his father came home from work with a design for small engine springs, but complained of the difficulties in making them quickly, Sharabian was intrigued and subsequently fashioned a specialized apparatus capable of winding wire accurately and rapidly. His father was so impressed that the innovation was adopted with minor modifications directly onto the factory floor.

Contact: Linda Ware
ware@jlab.org
757-269-7689
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

11-Jul-2003
Marie & Pierre Curie’s granddaughter, Hélène Langevin-Joliot, visits the United States
Jefferson Lab science writer Melanie O'Byrne spoke with Langevin-Joliot during the recent International Symposium for Spinal Radiography at Georgetown University. In the following excerpt, she discusses her work, passion for science, and remarkable family history. She is a respected nuclear physicist from the Institute of Nuclear Physics at Orsay, the laboratory set up by her parents, Irène and Frédéric Joliot-Curie, who won a Nobel Prize for chemistry in 1935 for their discovery of artificial radioactivity.

Contact: Linda Ware
ware@jlab.org
757-269-7689
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

27-Jun-2003
MINOS: Last plane at Soudan
After four years of work in a former iron mine a half-mile underground, the Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search collaboration celebrated a milestone for the ambitious MINOS particle physics experiment. On June 5, technicians erected the last of 485 house-high detector planes of steel and plastic in the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Soudan, Minnesota.

Contact: Elizabeth Clements
lizzie@fnal.gov
630-840-2326
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

27-Jun-2003
Why accelerators matter
Accelerators are also crucial to realizing the opportunities to dramatically advance our understanding of the universe and the laws that govern it. Not only can accelerators reveal much about the fundamental particles and forces, but also they can make discoveries that are critical to understanding the cosmos.

Contact: Elizabeth Clements
lizzie@fnal.gov
630-840-2326
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

27-Jun-2003
RunII status and prospects
In mid-August, just a few weeks from now, CDF and DZero experimenters will present the first full round of Run II physics results at the Lepton-Photon Symposium at Fermilab.

Contact: Elizabeth Clements
lizzie@fnal.gov
630-840-2326
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

13-Jun-2003
Fermilab users blend backgrounds and cultures in the pursuit of science
Fermilab users are defined as scientists who are members of experimental collaborations classified as active in the annually published "Fermilab Research Program Workbook." There are more than 2,600 of them, from 213 laboratories and universities the world over; from 99 institutions representing 34 states in the U.S., and another 114 institutions representing 31 countries.

Contact: Elizabeth Clements
lizzie@fnal.gov
630-840-2326
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

2-Jun-2003
Clustering in universe seen as indicator of galaxy evolution
Researchers at the Sloan Digital Sky Survey have discovered surprising new information about how galaxies cluster in space, leading to new information about evolutions of galaxies and matter in the universe. These findings were presented at the American Astronomical Society meeting in Nashville, Tennessee, on May 26, 2003.

Contact: Gary Ruderman
ssdspio@aol.com
312-320-4794
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

9-May-2003
Making connections
A group of University of Cincinnati physicists braved the freezing Illinois winter of 2001 testing mineral oils for the 40-foot tall MiniBooNE detector at Fermilab.They found the right oil and the MiniBooNE experiment took off without a hitch.

Contact: Sena Desai
sena@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

9-May-2003
Burning plasma: the future of fusion energy
Almost all activities on the surface of the earth are ultimately powered by the sun, whether by today's sunshine or by fossil fuels formed millions of years ago.

Contact: Elizabeth Clements
lizzie@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

9-May-2003
Answering the call
From 10-ton magnets to callibrations, the Technical Division's Material Control Department is one of the vital organs at Fermilab.

Contact: Mike Perricone
mikep@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

5-May-2003
SLAC experiment identifies new subatomic particle
Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's BaBar experiment have identified a new subatomic particle--Ds (2317)--which appears to be an unusual configuration of a "charm" quark and "strange" anti-quark. A scientific paper detailing this discovery has been submitted to Physical Review Letters.

Contact: Neil Calder
neil.calder@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-8707
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

3-Apr-2003
Los Alamos' 60th anniversary
As it turns 60 years old, Los Alamos National Laboratory holds a special place in the modern-day genealogy of science and technology, says George "Pete" Nanos, the laboratory's interim director. "We are proud of our accomplishments. However, we will never rest on our laurels or be held motionless by the past."

Contact: Jim Danneskiold
jdanneskiold@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

14-Feb-2003
Tough days ahead with FY04 science funding
As Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy, and chief science advisor to the President of the U.S., John Marburger has fuond that being on the inside doesn't always translate into a comfort zone.

Contact: Mike Perricone
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

14-Feb-2003
Cracking the neutrino code
Neutrinos are everywhere. Capable of traversing the entire earth at close to the speed of light, these particles shine no light, and only very rarely does one of them interact with anything at all.

Contact: Kurt Riesselmann
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

Showing stories 276-300 out of 459 stories.
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