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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive


Showing stories 276-300 out of 504 stories.
<< < 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 > >>


12-Jul-2004
Getting more for your energy buck
As the U.S. attempts to move away from dependence on foreign oil and toward less-polluting forms of energy, converting wasted heat into useful energy is increasingly important. In our country today, as much as 30 percent of the energy involved in large-scale industrial processes is lost through smokestacks. Gasoline and diesel engines lose 35 to 40 percent of their fuel energy in waste heat, primarily in the exhaust.

Contact: Ginny Silman
virginia.sliman@pnl.gov
509-375-4372
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

12-Jul-2004
Nanoparticles may mean longer for enzymes
The biochemical world's workaholic is the enzyme. Enzymes are molecules in cells that lead short, active and brutal lives. They restlessly catalyze their neighbors, cleaving and assembling proteins and metabolizing compounds. After a few hours of furious activity, they are what chemists call "destabilized," or spent.

Contact: Ginny Sliman
virginia.sliman@pnl.gov
509-375-4372
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

4-Jun-2004
Is dark matter actually black?
Gravity is the glue that holds together huge objects such as planets and galaxies. After looking at scores of galaxies, however, physicists realized something was amiss. On the outskirts of rotating galaxies, for example, stars were moving too fast for the galaxies to hold together by the gravity from the stars alone.

Contact: Interaction Point
tip@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

2-Jun-2004
Future space scientists train at Brookhaven Lab
As astronauts spend more time in space, scientists need to better understand the dangers space travelers face from deep-space radiation -- and how to best shield them against these risks. A new NASA Summer Student Program at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory will help provide a "pipeline" of researchers to tackle this challenge. The program begins June 1, 2004

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

1-Jun-2004
Shocking plutonium to reveal its secrets
One of the most daunting scientific and engineering challenges today is ensuring the safety and reliability of the nation's nuclear arsenal. To effectively meet that challenge, scientists need better data showing how plutonium, a key component of nuclear warheads, behaves under extreme pressures and temperatures. On July 8, 2003, Lawrence Livermore researchers performed the inaugural experiment of a 30-meter-long, two-stage gas gun designed to obtain those data.

Contact: Mark Martinez
martinez17@llnl.gov
925-423-7572
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

1-Jun-2004
Seeing the universe in a grain of dust
Imagine traveling halfway to Jupiter--3.2 billion kilometers--for a small handful of comet dust. That's the mission for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Stardust spacecraft launched on February 7, 1999. This past January, Stardust flew by Comet Wild 2's nucleus and through a halo of gases and dust at the comet's head, collecting cometary dust particles released from the surface just hours before.

Contact: John Bradley
bradely33@llnl.gov
925-423-0666
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

1-Jun-2004
Nuclear plants may be clean hydrogen source
For more than 100 years, visionaries have periodically espoused the dream of an economy driven by hydrogen - an efficient fuel that emits only water when burned.

Contact: Catherine Foster
media@anl.gov
630-252-5580
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

1-Jun-2004
Argonne tests, creates fuel cells to power the future
Fuel cells are a key component of the nation's plan for a secure energy future. Fuel cells convert hydrogen gas into electricity and water. Since hydrogen can be produced from a variety of domestic resources, researchers are seeking cost-efficient ways to use it to meet the nation's growing energy needs and reduce the nation's oil reliance.

Contact: Catherine Foster
media@anl.gov
630-252-5580
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

1-Jun-2004
Fueling the hydrogen future with Argonne's ceramic membrane
A ceramic membrane developed at Argonne brings fuel-cell cars closer to reality by efficiently and inexpensively extracting hydrogen from fossil fuels.

Contact: Catherine Foster
media@anl.gov
630-252-5580
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

1-Jun-2004
Superconductivity team wins top research prizes
Awards presented in 2003 to three Argonne scientists highlighted the excellence of Argonne's superconductivity program.

Contact: Catherine Foster
media@anl.gov
630-252-5580
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

21-May-2004
First seven years of physics with CEBAF
To recognize and review the accomplishments of Jefferson Lab, the JLab User Group Board of Directors organized the symposium which was held June 11-13, 2003 and dedicated to the memory of Nathan Isgur, Jefferson Lab's first Chief Scientist. The meeting was divided into eight topics: nucleon form factors, few-body physics, reactions involving nuclei, strangeness production, structure functions, parity violation, deep exclusive reactions, and hadron spectroscopy. Each topic was presented by one experimentalist and one theorist.

Contact: Linda Ware
ware@jlab.org
757-269-7689
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

6-May-2004
Brookhaven-developed recyclable catalyst may help to reduce hazardous industrial waste
Brookhaven chemists have developed a new, "green" catalyst -- one that converts chemical reactants into usable products without producing waste.

Contact: Morris Bullock
bullock@bnl.gov
631-344-4315
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

6-May-2004
Brookhaven develops clean, sustainable energy alternatives
Biofuel field testing, wind-energy design, battery-material development, natural-gas harvesting, clean hydrogen production -- these are several of the alternative-energy research initiatives now underway at Brookhaven. The goal is to transfer to industry technology that solves world-wide energy challenges in an innovative, economically feasible fashion.

Contact: William Horak
horak@bnl.gov
631-344-2627
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

6-May-2004
Let the light shine: SPEAR3 up and running
SPEAR3's shutters are open and users are getting their first taste of work with the completely rebuilt synchrotron radiation facility.

Contact: The Interaction Point
tip@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

27-Apr-2004
Sandia to lead Center of Excellence
In his State of the Union address last year, President Bush proclaimed, "our scientists and engineers will overcome obstacles to taking these cars from laboratory to showroom so that the first car driven by a child born today could be powered by hydrogen, and pollution-free." Stepping up to that challenge are researchers at Sandia National Laboratories in California, which has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy to lead a virtual Center of Excellence for the development of reversible metal hydrides materials.

Contact: Mike Janes
mejanes@sandia.gov
925-294-2447
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

5-Apr-2004
Engine shows diesel efficiency without the emissions
Computer models are helping Laboratory engineers better understand the homogeneous compression charge ignition engine, a fuel-efficient engine with reduced harmful emissions.

Contact: Salvador Aceves
aceves6@llnl.gov
925-422-0864
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

5-Apr-2004
Defending against corrosion
Livermore researchers are designing a rugged system to prevent nuclear wastes from seeping into the environment at the proposed underground repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

Contact: Dan McCright
mccright1@llnl.gov
925-422-7051
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

1-Apr-2004
Shooting for the moons
Exploring planets beyond Mars will require a power source different from those now deployed in American spacecraft. Radioisotope thermal generators and solar energy cannot meet the challenges posed by proposed missions to the cold, dark regions of our solar system. ORNL engineers are convinced nuclear fission power will.

Contact: ORNL Review
865-574-7183
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Apr-2004
Getting credit
When nuclear fuel is irradiated, or "burned," in a reactor, its reactivity drops as the uranium fuel is consumed and fission products accumulate. The less reactive the burned, or spent, fuel removed from the reactor, the less likely that the fuel can go critical, or sustain a chain reaction.

Contact: ORNL Review
865-574-7183
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Apr-2004
Staying In the comfort zone
Randy Nanstad examines the setup for a fracture toughness test of a stainless steel cladding specimen from the Davis-Besse reactor pressure vessel head.

Contact: ORNL Review
865-574-7183
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Apr-2004
Recovering fuel from waste
The nation's permanent nuclear waste repository could be used more efficiently than currently planned, according to ORNL's Emory Collins. He and his colleagues believe it makes sense for the repository to take mainly nuclear fission products, or 5% of the wastes, and turn away the bulk of the waste--spent nuclear fuel. The usable uranium and plutonium in this material could be extracted, chemically treated, and recycled as mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel for nuclear reactors.

Contact: ORNL Review
865-574-7183
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Apr-2004
Coming full circle
The resurrection of gas centrifuge technology for uranium enrichment--a dream come true for many Oak Ridge researchers--has brought the largest CRADA ever to ORNL.

Contact: ORNL Review
865-574-7183
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Apr-2004
A revolutionary reactor concept
A revolutionary nuclear reactor concept, based partly on ORNL's past coolant and fuel research, could be an economical source of hydrogen. Called the Advanced High-Temperature Reactor(AHTR), it would cost only half as much as current gas-cooled reactor concepts.

Contact: ORNL Review
865-574-7183
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Apr-2004
Can the next generation take the heat?
Oak Ridge National Laboratory has long been a world leader in materials research, and now with the resurgence of interest in nuclear energy, ORNL has a leading role in developing and selecting materials for the next generation of nuclear power plants.

Contact: ORNL Review
865-574-7183
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Apr-2004
Fabricating fuels
Over the past decade, increased public pressure to provide more electricity, reduce air pollution, and slow the rate of global warming has led many Americans to revisit the potential of nuclear power to meet anticipated demands for more energy. The Department of Energy and others in the scientific community are interested in adapting the gas-cooled reactor for use both in producing hydrogen for fuel cells to power cars and buildings and in supplying electricity competitively.

Contact: ORNL Review
865-574-7183
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Showing stories 276-300 out of 504 stories.
<< < 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 > >>


 

 

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