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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive

Showing stories 276-300 out of 479 stories.
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22-Mar-2004
Caolionn O'Connell aims for higher energies
In between trail-running expeditions through California's Portola Valley, Caolionn O'Connell can be found luring electrons to surf waves of energy so powerful they rip matter apart.

Contact: Jeff Sherwood
jeff.sherwood@hq.doe.gov
202-586-5806
DOE/US Department of Energy

10-Mar-2004
In a virtual sky, astronomers find dark matter
Making sense of the data coming from the Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of two main instruments of the GLAST mission, will take highly trained eyes and sophisticated software. Once the NASA probe is in orbit in 2007, astronomers will be able to hit the ground running thanks to three rounds of a simulation drill called Data Challenges, or DC. After six months of preparation, the first round started last December and ended successfully with a SLAC workshop in February.

Contact: Editorial Team
tip@slac.stanford.edu
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

3-Mar-2004
INEEL helps design winter wonder bus
Yellowstone National Park may soon become more accessible in both winter and summer, thanks to collaborative efforts to develop a new alternative fuel vehicle.

Contact: Teri Ehresman
ehr@inel.gov
208-526-7785
DOE/Idaho National Laboratory

1-Mar-2004
Dance of the planes
Less than four years after breaking ground at Fermilab for an underground complex consisting of 4,000 feet of tunnels and two experimental halls, scientists of the Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search collaboration are preparing for the first components of a 1,000-ton neutrino detector to go underground. Technicians will lower the first of 282 octagonal-shaped detector planes--each weighing more than a pickup truck--down a 350-foot shaft on the Fermilab site in March.

Contact: Kurt Riesselmann
kurtr@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

1-Mar-2004
The sensitive giant
CERN's Large Hadron Collider, set to begin operations later this decade, will boast four new detectors around its 16-mile ring. Fermilab is heavily involved in the Compact Muon Solenoid, but the LHC is constructing another huge multipurpose detector in competition for discovery of the Higgs particle and several other fundamental targets: ATLAS, A Toroidal LHC ApparatuS.

Contact: Matt Hutson
mhutson@fnal.gov
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

1-Mar-2004
Budget talks
Flat budgets, visa roadblocks, contract competition and the search for a new director stood out as the hot topics at the Universities Research Association's annual Council of Presidents meeting on February 4 at the National Academy of Sciences. And with the unveiling of the Department of Energy's FY05 budget request only days before the meeting, it came as no surprise when funding concerns took center stage.

Contact: Elizabeth Clements
lizzie@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

1-Mar-2004
Good neighbor policy
In a major step toward strengthening relationships with its neighbors, Fermilab is forming a Community Task Force on Public Participation with about 25 representatives from DuPage, Kane and DeKalb Counties.

Contact: Katie Yurkewicz
katie@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

1-Mar-2004
The power of one
Plans and hopes for a Linear Collider chart a straight course toward unification.

Contact: Mike Perricone
mikep@fnal.gov
630-840-5678
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

19-Feb-2004
A new layer of sensitivity
Fermilab scientists are adding a new front line to the battery of sensors inside the giant DZero detector. They've just completed the design of a new set of sensors, to be installed in a very confined space, which will give new life to the experiment.

Contact: Matt Hutson
mhutson@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

19-Feb-2004
DZero breaks new ground in global computing efforts
Searching for subatomic particles very much resembles the often-cited search for the needle in the haystack. Since the beginning of Collider Run II in March 2001, DZero scientists have collected more than 550 million particle collisions. The data fill five stacks of CDs as high as the Eiffel tower--storage cases not included. And the (hay)stacks are growing every day.

Contact: Kurt Riesselmann
kurtr@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

19-Feb-2004
NLC collaboration reaches critical high-power X-band goal
The team, part of the U.S.-Japanese Next Linear Collider-Global Linear Collider collaboration, is working on X-band accelerator technology (for the so-called "warm" linear collider). The international particle physics community is also considering another technology option for the linear collider: superconducting radiofrequency technology, being pursued by the TESLA collaboration led by DESY in Germany.

Contact: Mike Perricone
mikep@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

1-Jan-2004
Are we ready for the dark side?
Simply put, dark energy is a mystery. The expansion of the universe is accelerating, and theorists believe that dark energy is the driving force behind it. Evidence shows that dark energy makes up approximately 70 percent of the universe, meaning 25 percent is dark matter and 4 percent is matter made of atoms.

Contact: Elizabeth Clements
lizzie@fnal.gov
630-840-2326
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

1-Jan-2004
Looking ahead: Fermilab prospects in 2004
As we approach the New Year it is a good time to predict the future. What will be happening at Fermilab in 2004?

Contact: Elizabeth Clements
lizzie@fnal.gov
630-840-2326
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

5-Dec-2003
Anthony Thomas accepts position of Chief Scientist and Theory Group Leader at Jefferson Lab
The Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility is pleased to announce that Dr. Anthony Thomas has accepted the position of Chief Scientist and Head of the Theory Group at Jefferson Lab.

Contact: Linda Ware
ware@jlab.org
757-269-7689
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

1-Dec-2003
Nuclear renaissance
Growing levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide are raising concerns of global warming and sparking renewed interest in nuclear power. Unlike coal- and gas-fired power plants, nuclear power plants provide electricity without emitting carbon dioxide. They could also enable a hydrogen economy.

Contact: Research Quarterly Staff
larq@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Dec-2003
RAPTOR science
A small robotic observatory system, called RAPTOR, is poised to take movies of fleeting astrophysical events. These movies will help astronomers better understand planetary systems, stars, galaxies, and the universe. Some of RAPTOR's data analysis techniques can also be applied to defense problems.

Contact: Research Quarterly Staff
larq@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Dec-2003
Nanofluids? Cool!
Adding nanoscale particles--so small they are measured in billionths of a meter--to conventional liquids holds the promise of more efficient cooling for engines, machinery and supercomputers. These "nanofluids" have increased by up to 150 percent the heat-transfer rate of fluids.

Contact: Evelyn Brown
eabrown@anl.gov
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

1-Dec-2003
PPPL researchers study plasma sterilization
Hundreds of billions of plastic food and beverage containers are manufactured each year in the U.S. All of these packages must undergo sterilization, which at present is done using high temperatures or chemicals. Both of these methods have drawbacks. What if a new method could be found that eliminated the need for chemicals or heat-resistant plastics?

Contact: PPPL News
ademeo@pppl.gov
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

1-Dec-2003
By-line from the frontlines
The process of science--the building of instruments, analysis of raw data, debugging of computer code, cleaning of lenses--usually doesn't make it to the headlines. You hear "Scientists Find Top Quark," but never, "Scientists Find New Use for Mylar Tape." Experimental physicists know better than anyone the tangled marriage of serendipity and tedium in nailing down a discovery.

Contact: Elizabeth Clements
lizzie@fnal.gov
630-840-2326
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

1-Dec-2003
Two mysteries, one solution?
Using detectors chilled to near absolute zero, from a vantage point half a mile below ground, physicists of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search announced the November 12 launch of a quest that could lead to solving two mysteries that may turn out to be one and the same: the identity of the dark matter that pervades the universe, and the possible existence of supersymmetric particles.

Contact: Elizabeth Clements
lizzie@fnal.gov
630-840-2326
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

18-Nov-2003
Longest linac makes the world's shortest electron bunches
Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Stanford Linear Accelerator Center used the world's longest linear accelerator to develop the world's shortest bunches of electrons. Conversion of these bunches into bright, short pulses of X-ray light enables researchers to directly observe atomic motion never seen before in solids and liquids--allowing for instantaneous snapshots of simple chemical reactions in progress.

Contact: Press Office
202-586-5806
DOE/US Department of Energy

1-Nov-2003
Laboratories-on-a-chip foil terrorism
Laboratories-on-a-chip developed at Argonne can detect chemicals, bacteria or viruses that terrorists may use.

Contact: Rich Greb
rgreb@anl.gov
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

1-Nov-2003
Superconducting magnets
When you cool a piece of metal below a critical temperature, something magical happens. The atoms begin passing along electrons with zero resistance. People in the know refer to this rare state as "superconductivity."

Contact: Elizabeth Clements
lizzie@fnal.gov
630-840-2326
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

1-Nov-2003
Twenty years at the energy frontier
The Tevatron began operations in late 1983 when the E715 experiment initiated the use of the world's highest-energy beams. Since then more than forty fixed-target experiments have used Tevatron beams of protons, pions, muons, photons, hyperons and neutrinos to expand our knowledge of particles and forces.

Contact: Elizabeth Clements
lizzie@fnal.gov
630-840-2326
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

1-Oct-2003
Fermilab Today launches Result of the Week
Fermilab's daily online news service, Fermilab Today, launched a new weekly feature on September 18--the Fermilab Result of the Week. Each Thursday, FT will bring readers a new scientific result from ongoing research at Fermilab.

Contact: Elizabeth Clements
lizzie@fnal.gov
630-840-2326
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

Showing stories 276-300 out of 479 stories.
<< < 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 > >>

 

 

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