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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive

Showing stories 326-350 out of 488 stories.
<< < 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 > >>

5-May-2003
SLAC experiment identifies new subatomic particle
Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's BaBar experiment have identified a new subatomic particle--Ds (2317)--which appears to be an unusual configuration of a "charm" quark and "strange" anti-quark. A scientific paper detailing this discovery has been submitted to Physical Review Letters.

Contact: Neil Calder
neil.calder@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-8707
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

3-Apr-2003
Los Alamos' 60th anniversary
As it turns 60 years old, Los Alamos National Laboratory holds a special place in the modern-day genealogy of science and technology, says George "Pete" Nanos, the laboratory's interim director. "We are proud of our accomplishments. However, we will never rest on our laurels or be held motionless by the past."

Contact: Jim Danneskiold
jdanneskiold@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

14-Feb-2003
Tough days ahead with FY04 science funding
As Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy, and chief science advisor to the President of the U.S., John Marburger has fuond that being on the inside doesn't always translate into a comfort zone.

Contact: Mike Perricone
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

14-Feb-2003
Cracking the neutrino code
Neutrinos are everywhere. Capable of traversing the entire earth at close to the speed of light, these particles shine no light, and only very rarely does one of them interact with anything at all.

Contact: Kurt Riesselmann
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

6-Feb-2003
NREL wins research and development awards
The laboratory's three R&D 100 Awards for 2002 are for the PSS Coating System; a solar power system that produces electricity while still allowing sunlight to pass through it; and an incredibly thin ceramic fiber that effectively filters out bacteria and viruses and can enhance the performance of composite materials.

Contact: Sarah Holmes Barba
sarah_barba@prodigy.net
303-275-3023
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

6-Feb-2003
Tiny utility is big on wind energy
Waverly Light and Power began investing in renewable energy by installing the first utility-scale wind turbine in Iowa. This program, which certain energy "experts" thought was not feasible, has helped lead the way for wind energy development across the Midwest and was awarded the 2002 Paul Rappaport Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Award.

Contact: Sarah Holmes Barba
sarah_barba@nrel.gov
303-275-3023
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

6-Feb-2003
PV manager finds permanent home in America
Photovoltaics Program Manager Tom Surek has called many places home during his life, but it took the events of September 11 to make Surek realize where he really belongs.

Contact: Sarah Holmes Barba
sarah_barba@prodigy.net
303-275-3023
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

27-Jan-2003
Best rookie year ever for a supernova search facility
Researchers at the Nearby Supernova Factory, based at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, have discovered 34 supernovae during the system's first year of operation. This discovery was announced at the 201st meeting of the American Astronomical Society in January 2003.

Contact: Paul Preuss
paul_preuss@lbl.gov
510-486-6249
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

20-Jan-2003
RHIC results make headlines at Quark Matter 2004
Physicists from the four experimental collaborations collecting data at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) -- the world's largest facility for nuclear physics research, located at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory -- presented their latest results and analyses at the Quark Matter 2004 meeting held in Oakland, California, January 11 – 17.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

19-Dec-2002
2002: A big year for accomplishments at Los Alamos
In the tradition of "years in review" published nearly everywhere, John Browne, director of the Los Alamos National Laboratory, has published a sampling of technical accomplishments at this Department of Energy lab during 2002.

Contact: Bill Dupuy
wdupuy@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

9-Dec-2002
GENESIS’ first year a success
As scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory begin analysis of first-year data from the solar wind probe GENESIS they have determined the spacecraft is working so well that they are considering possibilities for research beyond the planned 2004 mission completion date. Three of GENESIS' instruments were designed and built at Los Alamos.

Contact: Kevin Roark
knroark@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

25-Nov-2002
Los Alamos helps forecast frequency of giant meteors
A system operated by the U.S. Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory and used to "listen" for clandestine nuclear tests has played a key role in helping scientists more accurately determine how often Earth is hammered by giant meteors.

Contact: James Rickman
jamesr@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

22-Nov-2002
Potomac parley presents particle physics project prioritization panel
Ray Orbach: "I want [the U.S. program] to be the best high-energy physics program in the world."

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

22-Nov-2002
A delicate balance
DOE review gives high marks to Tevatron improvements, but cites challenges ahead

Contact: Mike Perricone
mikep@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

1-Nov-2002
Meeting on neutral ground
Neutrinos offer a link between cosmologists and particle physicists.

Contact: Pamela Zerbinos
zerbinos@fnal.gov
630-840-2237
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

18-Oct-2002
Helping hands
In high-energy physics, friends don't let friends run at low luminosity. And with more than a little help from HEP friends, Fermilab's Tevatron has set a series of luminosity records, culminating at 8:50 a.m. on Wednesday, October 9. The world's most powerful particle accelerator achieved an unprecedented luminosity of 3.61 x 1031cm-2sec-1, a measure of the number of high-energy particle collisions per second, also characterized as the beam's brightness.

Contact: Elizabeth Clements
lizzie@fnal.gov
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

30-Sep-2002
Need for transportation technologies heads into overdrive
The transportation industry faces several challenges relating to vehicle fuel efficiency, regulated emissions and global warming. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Jud Virden talks about technologies being developed for transportation and how they fit into the nation's priorities relating to petroleum imports, global climate change, and environmental and health effects of emissions. Virden oversees the Laboratory's involvement in the U.S. Department of Energy's FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies program and other vehicle technology research.

Contact: Ginny Sliman
virginia.sliman@pnl.gov
509-375-4372
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

30-Sep-2002
Exhaustive research on emissions technologies
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is conducting fundamental scientific research that could help vehicles meet the EPA's aggressive emissions requirements.

Contact: Ginny Sliman
virginia.sliman@pnl.gov
509-375-4372
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

30-Sep-2002
Opportunity NOx
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers put their expertise in surface science and catalysis to work when they developed an effective plasma catalysis system for treating engine exhaust one of the first advanced emissions control technologies developed by the Laboratory.

Contact: Ginny Sliman
virginia.sliman@pnl.gov
509-375-4372
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

30-Sep-2002
Modeling for success
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's unique approach to computational modeling with solid oxide fuel cells combines computational chemistry codes, computational fluid dynamics and computational mechanics. It allows PNNL researchers to study not only the electrochemical reactions in fuel cells, but also how the electrochemical reactions interact with fuel cell design.

Contact: Ginny Sliman
virginia.sliman@pnl.gov
509-375-4372
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

30-Sep-2002
Fuel cells for transportation
Scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are developing fuel cells that use a vehicle's existing fuel supply to provide auxiliary power for creature comforts, such as air-conditioning, keeping drinks cold in mini-refrigerators and viewing DVDs--all without running the vehicle's engine or draining its battery.

Contact: Ginny Sliman
virginia.sliman@pnl.gov
509-375-4372
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

30-Sep-2002
Security technologies meet the needs of industry
A device that identifies contents in sealed containers and a system that can diagnose engine problems while the equipment is operating are among several innovative technologies developed for national security applications and moved into the marketplace by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. PNNL conducts scientific research in energy, the environment, national security, information technology and health, making an effort to commercialize technologies so they can help solve critical problems for industry and society.

Contact: Ginny Sliman
virginia.sliman@pnl.gov
509-375-4372
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

30-Sep-2002
Cooking up a better cathode
Scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are developing new cathode material for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). Their goal is to find a cathode material that will produce high power in the range of 600 to 800 degrees Celsius--low compared to the more typical SOFC operating temperature of 1,000 degrees Celsius.

Contact: Ginny Sliman
virginia.sliman@pnl.gov
509-375-4372
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

20-Sep-2002
FYI
If you've ever tried to speak with a member of the military, you know that comprehension is nearly impossible unless you're familiar with its language. You probably also know that its language of acronyms sometimes seems...well, pointless. They don't have cars, they have POVs--Privately Owned Vehicles.

Contact: Pam Zerbinos
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

20-Sep-2002
New neutrino experiment at Fermilab goes live
Scientists of the Booster Neutrino Experiment collaboration announced on September 9 that a new detector at the U.S. Department of Energy's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory has observed its first neutrino events.

Contact: Kurt Riesselmann
kurtr@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

Showing stories 326-350 out of 488 stories.
<< < 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 > >>

 

 

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