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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive

Showing stories 326-350 out of 459 stories.
<< < 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 > >>

12-Aug-2002
Mission: Luminosity
The sign says it all about our mission for this critical time in the Beams Division and at Fermilab--we are focused on improving the performance of the Tevatron for Run II, almost to the exclusion of anything else. Lots of people have already told me how much they like it--an indication that people in the division and in the laboratory are committed to succeeding.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

9-Aug-2002
Syracuse joins the search
The first chancellor of Syracuse University allowed his cow to graze on campus. But from those pastoral roots, the university has grown to be leader in the development of science and technology in New York state. In the 1980s, Syracuse launched one of the state's first Centers for Advanced Technology–the CASE Center--to revitalize local economic growth through technology. Last year, New York state was the second-largest sponsor, after the federal government, of research at the university.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

7-Aug-2002
Los Alamos GENIE mimics evolution to get at complex features in digital images
A system created at Los Alamos National Laboratory mimics evolution to create more effective algorithms for detecting features in digital images produced by a variety of remote-sensing techniques.

Contact: Bill Dupuy
wdupuy@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

29-Jul-2002
Designer molecules set the trend for advancing science
Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are developing computational tools to rapidly design and build new molecular structures and screen them before synthesizing the real molecule. The power of this approach is illustrated in the April 26, 2002 issue of the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Mary Ace
mary.ace@pnl.gov
509-372-4277
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

25-Jul-2002
Imaging system visualizes plasma turbulence
Researchers from three laboratories funded by the U. S. Department of Energy have captured high-resolution images of instabilities that cause heat to leak rapidly from the plasma edge of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) and the Alcator C-Mod fusion experiments. Advanced imaging cameras were used to freeze plasma action at a rate of up to 1 million frames per second.

Contact: Anthony R. DeMeo
ademeo@pppl.gov
609-243-2755
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

19-Jul-2002
Fermilab and LHC: A major stakeholder
The United States has a $531 million commitment to provide accelerator and detector components for the Large Hadron Collider, which is under construction at CERN, the European Particle Physics Laboratory in Geneva, Switzerland, and which will begin operations later this decade. With a major role in construction of the LHC accelerator and the CMS detector, Fermilab will be positioned for a major role in the emergent physics when LHC begins operating later this decade.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

19-Jul-2002
Measuring up
Physics is the science of measurement, and measurement relies on unchanging standards--the inch, the centimeter, the second, the electron volt. But what if a standard is distorted and unreliable? How can a measurement be accurate?

Contact: Mike Perricone
mikep@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

19-Jul-2002
Notes from underground
Neutrinos fly through the earth with the greatest of ease. In the blink of eye, they flit effortlessly through the planet's rocky crust at nearly the speed of light. Not so for the miners of generations past who dug their way, foot by backbreaking, dangerous foot, through the rock of Minnesota's Iron Range.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

15-Jul-2002
Tiny device can detect hidden nuclear weapons
A small, portable detector for finding concealed nuclear weapons and materials has been developed by the Argonne National Laboratory. When fully developed, the device could assist international inspectors charged with preventing smuggling and unauthorized use of nuclear weapons and materials.

Contact: Catherine Foster
cfoster@anl.gov
630-252-5580
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

15-Jul-2002
New CO2 process for higher-density microchip fabrication
Patented process developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory is designed to remove limits to the superconductor industry's growth while also solving environmental issues.

Contact: Bill Dupuy
wdupuy@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jul-2002
Wallace recognized for work in China
NREL's Bill Wallace was awarded the 2001 Chinese National Friendship Award for his outstanding contributions towards the long-term development of renewable energy in China. The Friendship Award is the highest-level state award that can be given to foreign experts in China. In 2001, 50 foreign experts from 17 countries were recognized in ceremonies conducted during the national celebration of the 52nd anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China.

Contact: Sarah Holmes Barba
sarah_barba@nrel.gov
303-275-3023
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

1-Jul-2002
NREL sponsors Habitat House in honor of anniversary
The Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory's managing partners, Midwest Research Institute (MRI), Battelle and Bechtel, are sponsoring the construction of a Habitat for Humanity home by providing the sponsorship fee. NREL's commitment calls for 3,000 volunteer hours to help build the house. Volunteers will be recruited from NREL and DOE staff, friends and family members.

Contact: Sarah Holmes Barba
sarah_barba@nrel.gov
303-275-3023
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

28-Jun-2002
Particle physics made painless
When you're searching for something, you can usually count on finding it in the last place you look. The search might take you through countless nooks and crannies, but each one that comes up empty serves to reduce the number of nooks and crannies remaining to look.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

28-Jun-2002
Come-from-behind success
Research can be as dramatic as a sports tournament. Even if you are off to a slow start, your team still can show a strong performance in the playoffs. The discovery of the bottom quark, found twenty-five years ago at Fermilab, is a case in point.

Contact: Kurt Riesselmann
kurtr@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

17-Jun-2002
Conducting-insulating materials reveal their secrets
Research by physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory provides new insight into why some materials made of stacks of metallic planes are conductors in the direction of the planes and are insulators in the direction perpendicular to the planes. Such behavior is in marked contradiction with scientists' traditional understanding of metallic conductivity, where the electrical current is carried by electrons in every direction.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

17-Jun-2002
Have doubly-charmed baryons been discovered?
On May 31, 2002, a group of physicists presented the results of a year-long analysis of an experiment carried out at the Department of Energy's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. Sifting through the data of particle collisions in which they produced particles made of three quarks, the experimenters found signals that indicate the creation of new particles with quark combinations never observed before. However, experimenters emphasized that significant questions remain in the interpretation of these results.

Contact: Kurt Riesselmann
kurtr@fnal.gov
630-840-5861
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

14-Jun-2002
A deep sense of place
If Gertrude Stein had ever visited this far northeastern corner of Minnesota, she probably would have written about the Soudan region in the same way she did about Oakland, California: "There is no there, there" But that's all right, because the people up here like it that way. And they'd know that Gertrude Stein never worked in a mine. Most people up here have, one time or another, often through more than one generation, and often through lean times.

Contact: Mike Perricone
mikep@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

14-Jun-2002
Extended family?
On Friday, May 31, a group of physicists presented the results of a year-long analysis of an experiment carried out at the Department of Energy's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. Sifting through the data of particle collisions in which they produced particles made of three quarks, the experimenters found signals that indicate the creation of new particles with quark combinations never observed before. However, experimenters emphasized that significant questions remain in the interpretation of these results.

Contact: Kurt Riesselmann
kurtr@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

14-Jun-2002
Energy Secretary Abraham announces Center for Nanosciences at Brookhaven Lab
Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham today announced that the department plans to proceed with a center for nanoscale science research at its Brookhaven National Laboratory on Long Island.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

6-Jun-2002
PPPL develops detection system to boost anti-terror efforts
Anti-terrorism efforts may get a boost from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). A team led by PPPL engineer Charlie Gentile is developing a miniature nuclear detection system to scan objects such as cars, luggage, and vessels for specific nuclear signatures associated with materials employed in nuclear weapons. This system could be installed at tollbooths and airports, as well as in police cruisers to detect unauthorized nuclear materials being transported.

Contact: Anthony R. DeMeo
ademeo@pppl.gov
609-243-2755
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

3-Jun-2002
Angling for a better (nano) surface
A promising method for creating and studying chemically tailored nanocrystalline surface materials was recently developed by researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Results are reported in the April 11, 2002, issue of the Journal of Physical Chemistry B.

Contact: PNNL Media Relations
pnl.media.relations@pnl.gov
509-375-3776
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

24-May-2002
Time for communicators to catch up
In high-energy physics, we are accustomed to dealing with paradoxes. We build huge detectors for tiny particles. Studying the infinitesimally small contributes to our understanding of the farthest reaches of the universe. But we have created for ourselves a paradox that produces internal friction and heat, yet precious little light. Although we are outstanding collaborators, we don’t communicate with a unified voice.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

24-May-2002
Diggin in
Miners of the S.A. Healy company are carrying out the final excavation work for a new underground facility at Fermilab that could easily store thousands of cars, neatly lined up and stacked on top of each other. Physicists will use the new caverns to build a research laboratory called Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI).

Contact: Kurt Riesselmann
kurtr@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

24-May-2002
Beam me up
Marking the completion of its detector with a final cup of ultra-pure mineral oil—the last of 250,000 gallons of this translucent liquid—MiniBooNE is about to start the quest to repeat the landmark result of the Liquid Scintillating Neutrino Detector at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

22-May-2002
LANSCE builds on 2001 successes as it readies for new run
As researchers at the world’s most powerful linear accelerator prepare for the upcoming run cycle, they look back on a successful 2001 run cycle that produced scores of experimental results for basic and defense science, built key new facilities and instruments and set records for operating efficiency.

Contact: Jim Danneskiold
slinger@lanl.gov
505-667-1640
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Showing stories 326-350 out of 459 stories.
<< < 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 > >>

 

 

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