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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive

Showing stories 376-400 out of 494 stories.
<< < 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 > >>

17-Jun-2002
Have doubly-charmed baryons been discovered?
On May 31, 2002, a group of physicists presented the results of a year-long analysis of an experiment carried out at the Department of Energy's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. Sifting through the data of particle collisions in which they produced particles made of three quarks, the experimenters found signals that indicate the creation of new particles with quark combinations never observed before. However, experimenters emphasized that significant questions remain in the interpretation of these results.

Contact: Kurt Riesselmann
kurtr@fnal.gov
630-840-5861
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

14-Jun-2002
A deep sense of place
If Gertrude Stein had ever visited this far northeastern corner of Minnesota, she probably would have written about the Soudan region in the same way she did about Oakland, California: "There is no there, there" But that's all right, because the people up here like it that way. And they'd know that Gertrude Stein never worked in a mine. Most people up here have, one time or another, often through more than one generation, and often through lean times.

Contact: Mike Perricone
mikep@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

14-Jun-2002
Extended family?
On Friday, May 31, a group of physicists presented the results of a year-long analysis of an experiment carried out at the Department of Energy's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. Sifting through the data of particle collisions in which they produced particles made of three quarks, the experimenters found signals that indicate the creation of new particles with quark combinations never observed before. However, experimenters emphasized that significant questions remain in the interpretation of these results.

Contact: Kurt Riesselmann
kurtr@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

14-Jun-2002
Energy Secretary Abraham announces Center for Nanosciences at Brookhaven Lab
Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham today announced that the department plans to proceed with a center for nanoscale science research at its Brookhaven National Laboratory on Long Island.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

6-Jun-2002
PPPL develops detection system to boost anti-terror efforts
Anti-terrorism efforts may get a boost from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). A team led by PPPL engineer Charlie Gentile is developing a miniature nuclear detection system to scan objects such as cars, luggage, and vessels for specific nuclear signatures associated with materials employed in nuclear weapons. This system could be installed at tollbooths and airports, as well as in police cruisers to detect unauthorized nuclear materials being transported.

Contact: Anthony R. DeMeo
ademeo@pppl.gov
609-243-2755
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

3-Jun-2002
Angling for a better (nano) surface
A promising method for creating and studying chemically tailored nanocrystalline surface materials was recently developed by researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Results are reported in the April 11, 2002, issue of the Journal of Physical Chemistry B.

Contact: PNNL Media Relations
pnl.media.relations@pnl.gov
509-375-3776
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

24-May-2002
Time for communicators to catch up
In high-energy physics, we are accustomed to dealing with paradoxes. We build huge detectors for tiny particles. Studying the infinitesimally small contributes to our understanding of the farthest reaches of the universe. But we have created for ourselves a paradox that produces internal friction and heat, yet precious little light. Although we are outstanding collaborators, we don’t communicate with a unified voice.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

24-May-2002
Diggin in
Miners of the S.A. Healy company are carrying out the final excavation work for a new underground facility at Fermilab that could easily store thousands of cars, neatly lined up and stacked on top of each other. Physicists will use the new caverns to build a research laboratory called Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI).

Contact: Kurt Riesselmann
kurtr@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

24-May-2002
Beam me up
Marking the completion of its detector with a final cup of ultra-pure mineral oil—the last of 250,000 gallons of this translucent liquid—MiniBooNE is about to start the quest to repeat the landmark result of the Liquid Scintillating Neutrino Detector at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

22-May-2002
LANSCE builds on 2001 successes as it readies for new run
As researchers at the world’s most powerful linear accelerator prepare for the upcoming run cycle, they look back on a successful 2001 run cycle that produced scores of experimental results for basic and defense science, built key new facilities and instruments and set records for operating efficiency.

Contact: Jim Danneskiold
slinger@lanl.gov
505-667-1640
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

20-May-2002
Research with high magnetic fields
The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory at DOE's Los Alamos National Laboratory develops for use in basic research the world's most powerful pulsed electromagnets. A super-powerful generator can deliver a pulse equal to more than one million times the magnetic field found naturally on Earth.

Contact: Bill Dupuy
wdupuy@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

13-May-2002
Two years of SNO prove the case: Solar neutrinos really do change
Most solar neutrinos undergo a metamorphosis during their 93-million-mile journey to Earth, according to results from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). This contradicts the predictions of the Standard Model, but explains why experimenters have been able to measure far fewer solar neutrinos than expected.

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

10-May-2002
Near-frictionless carbon coating nears commercial applications
Four years and more than 3,000 phone calls and e-mail contacts later, Argonne's "near-frictionless carbon" coating stands on the brink of commercialization. A sample of the coating on a sapphire substrate survived 17.5 million passes of a steel ball. After 32 days, the testing machine failed, but the ball left only a barely visible track on the coating.

Contact: Catherine Foster
cfoster@anl.gov
630-252-5580
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

10-May-2002
Charged Up - There's nothing neutral about Boris Kayser
Kayser, 63, is an overtly enthusiastic particle physics theorist whose eyebrows and voice rise in proportion to his excitement. He joined the staff of Fermilab's theoretical physics department in October 2001, with the title of Fermilab distinguished scientist. He brought with him more than a decade of academic research, and three decades at the National Science Foundation (NSF). As Fermilab undertakes its neutrino detection and oscillation experiments with MiniBooNE and MINOS, Kayser hopes for a confrontation with big questions.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

6-May-2002
Molecular shuttling
The Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratory researchers observed molecular shuttling on a man-made membrane that mimics cellular behavior. Recurring movements may evolve into rudimentary tools of nanoconstruction. These observations were published as the cover story in the April 30, 2002, issue of the chemical and biophysics journal Langmuir.

Contact: John German
jdgerma@sandia.gov
505-844-5199
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

2-May-2002
Interactions: the un-common language of science
FermiNews presents an ongoing series dedicated to issues and opportunities in communicating high-energy physics.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
Simulating supernovae on supercomputers
Multidimensional simulations of core-collapse supernovae will answer important questions about the creation and dissemination of elements that make life possible. They may also be important in the development of “enabling technologies” for other applications, such as combustion, climate, fusion, stockpile stewardship, and nuclear medicine.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
Modeling magnetic materials
Materials research using supercomputers is paving the way for the next generation of information technology.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

30-Apr-2002
Designing electronic devices using supercomputers
A proposed molecular memory cell that would allow laptop computer batteries to last 100 times longer than today’s batteries is being modeled computationally on an IBM supercomputer at ORNL. This machine is also being used to simulate electron transport in carbon nanotubes in contact with other components, for future nanoscale electronic devices.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

23-Apr-2002
A nickel's worth of foil helps make antimatter
Making antimatter that can't be seen and that otherwise might not exist, filtering it through a nickel's worth of aluminum foil and then capturing it in a "trap" without walls, has the attention of Los Alamos National Laboratory physicist Michael Holzscheiter.

Contact: Bill Dupuy
dupuy@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

19-Apr-2002
New ceramic membranes may help hydrogen replace gasoline as auto fuel
If hydrogen fuel cells are ever to replace gasoline engines in cars, they will need a cheap source of high-purity hydrogen -- and Argonne technology could provide one. Argonne's Energy Technology Division has developed a ceramic membrane that can extract hydrogen from methane, the chief component of natural gas.

Contact: Catherine Foster
cfoster@anl.gov
630-252-5580
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

19-Apr-2002
The question
This response to a Fermilab employee's email examines the reasons why particle physics research is done and how both Fermilab particle physicists and others perceive its value for our nation and the world.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

1-Apr-2002
New standard in sensor technology
The Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory and the University of Michigan integrated basic research in two separate areas—organic light-emitting devices and fluorescent sensors—to develop an innovative new OLED/optical chemical sensor with possible wide-ranging applications such as medical testing, drug discovery, and pathogen detection.

Contact: Saren Johnston
sarenj@ameslab.gov
515-294-3474
DOE/Ames Laboratory

1-Apr-2002
Quantum simulations tell the atomic-level story
With quantum molecular dynamics simulations, scientists can get an accurate picture of what happens to individual atoms during an experiment.

Contact: Giulia Galli
galli@llnl.gov
925-423-4223
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

29-Mar-2002
'Dear Monica...'
Monica Charpentier, a junior at Dulaney High School in Timonium, Maryland submitted a question about the property of charge. "Just what is it?" she wanted to know. Her query found its way to Fermilab theorist Andreas Kronfeld, who welcomed the opportunity to follow her questions and insights to succeeding levels of complexity.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

Showing stories 376-400 out of 494 stories.
<< < 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 > >>

 

 

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