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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive

Showing stories 426-450 out of 496 stories.
<< < 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 > >>

31-Dec-2001
Car crash simulations may improve vehicle efficiency
ORNL researchers are building computer models of vehicles made of aluminum, regular steel, high-strength steel, and carbon-fiber composites. This research could lead to safer, energy-efficient cars.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
Computer modeling aids understanding of plasma physics
ORNL fusion researchers are using supercomputers to understand plasma turbulence, design a device that could eliminate plasma disruptions, and find ways to get radio waves to not only heat but also control the plasma to allow sustained energy-producing fusion reactions.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
Chemical experiments and predictions by computer
Supercomputers can be used to simulate chemical reactions, saving time and money and increasing safety.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

14-Dec-2001
View from the top
Lederman Fellow Natalia Kuznetsova describes her research involving the Tevatron, a powerful proton-antiproton collider, and the potential for new, unexpected phenomena that may result from this and other projects at Fermilab.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

14-Dec-2001
Just the right type
High school physics teacher and former mechanical engineer Len Bugel is a valuable asset to the Fermilab MiniBooNE experiment, which aims to confirm or refute the evidence for neutrino oscillations claimed by the Liquid Scintillating Neutrino Detector (LSND) experiment at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

3-Dec-2001
Nanoskin
These self-assembling nanostructures—as durable as seashells—may lower costs by reducing the need for expensive manufactured devices like stress detectors, chemical analyzers, and thermometers.

Contact: Neal Singer
nsinger@sandia.gov
505-845-7078
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

26-Nov-2001
New way to make 'neuts'
Neutrons can penetrate deeply to find defects in large machine parts or tiny microdevices, elucidate the structure of biological systems and polymers, sense fluids in geological formations, and probe solids and liquids on the atomic scale.

Contact: Paul Preuss
paul_preuss@lbl.gov
510-486-6249
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

23-Nov-2001
But enough about high-energy physics...
As U.S. high-energy physicists chart the course for their future, they must first reach agreement among themselves on a road map to the revolutionary new physics that nearly all agree lies ahead.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

23-Nov-2001
Totsuka: 'We will rebuild the detector' after shattering setback at Super-K
Yoji Totsuka, director of the Kamioka Observatory, announces plans for recovery from an accident that resulted in the implosion of thousands of light detectors inside the Super-Kamiokande experiment.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

23-Nov-2001
Afterglows, the hard way
Combining the newest of astronomical instruments with the most venerable techniques of patient attention to detail, scientists at the Department of Energy's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, the University of Chicago and other institutions believe they have made the first optical observation of a gamma ray burst afterglow unprompted by prior observation of the gamma ray burst itself-a so-called "orphan afterglow."

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

9-Nov-2001
NSF grant triggers wide computing possiblities form BTeV
Everybody talks about crashing computers, but nobody does anything about them. But with a $4.98 million National Science Foundation grant in the area of Information Technology Research, Fermilab's B-physics at the Tevatron experiment (BTeV) just might help solve the puzzle of "Why don't things always work as well as we'd like?"

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

5-Nov-2001
National Lab astrophysicists explore supernovae with an eye on national security
The SciDAC program within DOE's Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research supports High Energy and Nuclear Physics research in the use of terascale computers to dramatically extend exploration of the fundamental processes of nature, as well as advance the ability to predict the behavior of a broad range of complex natural and engineered systems.

Contact: Anne M. Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

1-Nov-2001
Magnetic refrigerator successfully tested
Using materials developed at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory, researchers have successfully demonstrated the world's first room-temperature, permanent-magnet, magnetic refrigerator.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

22-Oct-2001
SciDAC DOE initiative targets heart of fusion machine
Fusion energy, evident in the sun and stars, is the ultimate source of power because it provides an environmentally acceptable alternative to energy generated by fossil fuels. To achieve fusion energy requires that the fuel material be heated to hundreds of millions of degrees, much hotter than the sun.

Contact: Ron Walli
9rw@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

19-Oct-2001
Scientists provide the answers
Scientists participating in Fermilab's Ask-a-Scientist program give answers to common questions about particle physics.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

19-Oct-2001
Run II well under control
On March 1, Collider Run II began at Fermilab. It is a six-year enterprise to produce a record number of proton-antiproton collisions using the world's most powerful particle accelerator, the Tevatron.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

19-Oct-2001
A case of identity: Kerberos
Question for our time: Who are you, and can you prove it? Increasingly, the computing solution for these questions in these times is Kerberos, a system of "strong authentication" for computer users invented at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and already operating at many universities and several Department of Energy national laboratories.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

1-Oct-2001
A giant among us
Klaus Ruedenberg, an Ames Laboratory senior associate and an Iowa State University Distinguished Professor Emeritus, has been chosen to receive the prestigious American Chemical Society Award in Theoretical Chemistry.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

1-Oct-2001
Gravity in large extra dimensions
n 1998, Nima Arkani-Hamed found himself pondering one of the conundrums of modern physics: why is gravity so much weaker than the other fundamental forces? Surrounded by massive objects like falling apples, orbiting moons, and our own occasionally clumsy bodies, we don't think of gravity as weak. Compared to electromagnetism, however-or the aptly named strong force that binds quarks, or even the "weak" force that governs some forms of radioactive decay-gravity is feeble.

Contact: Ron Kolb
rrkolb@lbl.gov
510-486-7586
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

1-Oct-2001
Travels of a young physicist
A young physicist recounts his career from the University of California at Berkeley and the laboratories of Alexander Pines, famed pioneer in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to the Scuola Normale Superiore in Pisa, Italy.

Contact: Ron Kolb
rrkolb@lbl.gov
510-486-7586
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

1-Oct-2001
Tiny particles cause big stir
Emitted as the result of thermonuclear reactions in the core of the sun and supernovae, the ghostlike elementary particles called "neutrinos" usually travel unnoticed through space, in immense numbers and across vast distances. However, the discovery that these erstwhile phantoms have mass and are polymorphous generated substantial notice from the media on Earth.

Contact: Ron Kolb
rrkolb@lbl.gov
510-486-7586
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

1-Oct-2001
Microtools for the nanoworld
Most of what we call nanotechnology involves hundreds or thousands of atoms but in a nanometer there's enough room for three atoms. If we are going to achieve real nanotechnology, we are going to have to learn how to put atoms together one at a time.

Contact: Ron Kolb
rrkolb@lbl.gov
510-486-7586
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

1-Oct-2001
Beyond alchemy and the Wright brothers: Nanosecrets of everyday things
t's their nanostructure that makes many crucial materials useful, and chemical processes essential to everyday life routinely do their work on the nanoscale. There's a lot more to nanoscience than building itty-bitty widgets. Catalysts are "helper" substances that promote chemical reactions without themselves being consumed. Nature's catalysts, enzymes, assemble only specific end products. Industrial catalysts are rarely so precise.

Contact: Ron Kolb
rrkolb@lbl.gov
510-486-7586
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

1-Oct-2001
Dendrimers: Branching out into realms of molecular architecture
Dendrimers may well become the flagship of nanotechnology's building blocks, a class of polymerized macromolecules that have the potential to provide the most exquisitely tailored forms and functions ever realized outside of nature.

Contact: Ron Kolb
rrkolb@lbl.gov
510-486-7586
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

1-Oct-2001
Nanotubes: Superhard, superstrong, super useful
Not only do nanotubes offer a full range of electrical and thermal conductivity properties (they conduct heat better than any other known material), they're also about a hundred times stronger than steel and more durable than diamonds. Their potential for use in electronics is nothing short of mind-boggling: if all the nanotubes that could be packed into a one-half-inch cube were to be laid out end to end, they would stretch some 250,000 miles.

Contact: Ron Kolb
rrkolb@lbl.gov
510-486-7586
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Showing stories 426-450 out of 496 stories.
<< < 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 > >>

 

 

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