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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive

Showing stories 451-475 out of 496 stories.
<< < 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 > >>

1-Oct-2001
The coming of the nano-age.
The emerging field of nanotechnology promises to change the way almost everything—from vaccines to computers—is designed and made.

Contact: Ron Kolb
rrkolb@lbl.gov
510-486-7586
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

1-Oct-2001
Nanocrystals: The shape of things to come
Nanocrystals are particularly attractive as building blocks for larger structures because it's possible - even easy - to prepare nanocrystals that are highly perfect.

Contact: Ron Kolb
rrkolb@lbl.gov
510-486-7586
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

28-Sep-2001
The last universal physicist
On the occasion of his one hundredth birthday, we honor a great scientist who was born in Italy, made immense and lasting contributions to the birth of modern physics, and emigrated to the United States, where he carried out experiments and theoretical studies that ushered in the atomic age.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

17-Sep-2001
Long-life rechargeable batteries
If you're tired of cell phones and laptops that quickly lose their charge—or worse, their ability to be recharged—help may be on the way. Brookhaven National Laboratory scientists James Reilly, Gordana Adzic, John Johnson, Thomas Vogt, and James McBreen have developed a new metal alloy that could greatly improve the performance of rechargeable batteries.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

14-Sep-2001
Tools for healing
Discoveries in physics have helped forge dramatic advances in cancer treatment for over a century. In 1950-54, according to the National Cancer Institute, the five-year survival rate for all cancers was 35 percent; by 2000 it was 59 percent. With early detection and treatment, the five-year survival rate for screenable cancers is now 80 percent.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

14-Sep-2001
Tools for the future
The future of accelerator physics isn't just for physicists. As in the past, tomorrow's discoveries in particle accelerator science may lead to unexpected applications for medical diagnosis, healing and the understanding of human biology.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

14-Sep-2001
Tools for biomedical research
At the forefront of biomedical research, medical scientists use particle accelerators to explore the structure of biological molecules. They use the energy that charged particles emit when accelerated to nearly the speed of light to create one of the brightest lights on earth, 30 times more powerful than the sun and focused on a pinpoint.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

14-Sep-2001
Neutrons against cancer
The idea to build a Neutron Therapy Facility at Fermilab developed in the early 1970s when physicians and physicists shared a vision: to wield accelerator technology to combat cancer. Today, more than 3,100 patients have come to Fermilab in the hope of finding a cure for some of the worst tumors known in the medical field.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

14-Sep-2001
Tools for diagnosis
Advances in technology for medical diagnosis have created extraordinary new capabilities for imaging the human body. Many of medicine's most powerful diagnostic tools incorporate technology that physicists originally developed to explore the fundamental nature of matter.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

14-Sep-2001
Interdependent sciences: Physics and medicine
Many diagnostic and therapeutic techniques that have revolutionized medicine are also symbols of the interdependence of the physical and biomedical sciences. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Neutron Therapy are just two of the prominent examples of the successful collaboration among innovative medical researchers, physical scientists and engineers.

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

10-Sep-2001
Nanotemplates for nanostructures
Coffee beans spilled upon a table form no pattern—they're a mess—their distribution dictated by the laws of chance. The same was generally believed true of atoms deposited upon a substrate. The first vision of a peaceable kingdom in which deposited atoms form orderly, controllable 2-D nanopatterns has been observed by researchers at the Sandia National Laboratories.

Contact: Neal Singer
nsinger@sandia.gov
505-845-7078
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

1-Sep-2001
Insuring safety in future nuclear power systems
A research project to help ensure the safety of future nuclear power systems is being awarded $940,000 funding for a three-phase project under the Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Research Initiative.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

27-Aug-2001
Brookhaven physicists produce 'doubly strange nuclei'
Strange science has taken a great leap forward at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory. There, physicists have produced a significant number of "doubly strange nuclei," or nuclei containing two strange quarks.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

26-Aug-2001
University of Michigan wins the great solar car race
The University of Michigan's solar car, M-Pulse, cruised to victory in the American Solar Challenge on July 25, crossing the finish line at 11:37 a.m., after traveling 2,300 miles using only the energy of the sun.

Contact: Gary Schmitz
gary_schmitz@nrel.gov
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

20-Aug-2001
New lens could help find cancer tumors earlier
The new lens technology, developed by scientists at Argonne's Advanced Photon Source, uses gamma rays diffracted by a set of 828 copper crystal cubes arranged in 13 concentric rings in a disk slightly smaller than a dinner plate. The lens focuses the gamma radiation emitted from a small radioactive source in the body of a patient into a small, well-shielded detector.

Contact: Catherine Foster
cfoster@anl.gov
630-252-5580
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

20-Aug-2001
Mysterious material has unusual electrical properties
In the July 27, 2001, issue of Science magazine, the scientists describe findings that offer the first clues to explain the material's newly discovered, unusual electrical properties. This work may lead to applications using the material to store electrical charge in high-performance capacitors, and offer insight into how charges behave on the nanoscale-on the order of billionths of a meter.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
genzer@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

2-Aug-2001
New magnetic semiconductor material spins hope for quantum computing
The future of quantum computing offers the potential for substantially greater data storage and faster processing speeds, but its advancement has been limited by the absence of certain critically important materials—in particular, a semiconductor that is magnetic at room temperature. Now, scientists at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have created a semiconductor material that has superior magnetic properties at room temperature.

Contact: Staci Maloof
staci.maloof@pnl.gov
509-372-6313
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Aug-2001
Riding the d-wave
A paper appearing in a recent issue of the journal Nature has helped validate a theory on the enigmatic nature of superconducting materials that was first advanced by Los Alamos National Laboratory researcher Alexander Balatsky and his colleagues five years ago. The confirmation of the theory is another step in solving the enigma of superconductivity.

Contact: Alexander Balatsky
avb@lanl.gov
505-665-0077
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Aug-2001
The magnetic universe
Researchers in Applied Physics and Theory Divisions have recently compiled a sample of nearly 100 giant radio galaxies powered by black holes.

Contact: Hui Li
li@nis-mail.lanl.gov
505-665-3131
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Aug-2001
Lab builds world's first neptunium sphere
For the first time ever, a cross-section of nuclear materials scientists and technicians at the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research (CMR) facility has fashioned an eight- kilogram tungsten-and nickel-clad sphere of neptunium. The actinide metal sphere will be used in criticality safety and nuclear non-proliferation experiments at Technical Area 18, the critical experiments facility.

Contact: Larry Ussery
LUSSERY@LANL.GOV
505-665-0207
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

11-Jul-2001
The great solar car race: Cars will race along Route 66 without a drop of gas
As many as 40 race cars will leave Chicago July 15 in the first-ever attempt to travel America's historic Route 66 without spending a penny on gasoline. In a year that has seen unpredictable energy and gasoline prices, these drivers are betting that sunshine will take them all the way to Los Angeles, a feat that has never been tried in the 75-year history of the highway.

Contact: Gary Schmitz
gary_schmitz@nrel.gov
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
MicroCATS in space
Through a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the Laboratory is furthering the development of micro chemical and thermal systems, or MicroCATS, for chemical processing in space applications. The contract calls for both ground testing and testing in reduced-gravity situations. For Ward TeGrotenhuis and Susie Stenkamp of the Laboratory's chemical and biological processes development group, this means that one or both of them may be experiencing weightlessness and performing mid-air laboratory tests.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
Counting cosmic rays
In a cooperative effort, Pacific Northwest built the hardware and NASA supplied the software for the device nicknamed MARIE, for Mars Radiation Environment Experiment.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
Coconuts supply power to rural community
A typical coconut palm can produce 50 coconuts annually and lives an average of 75 years. For residents of Alaminos, a rural community in the Philippines, this means a ready supply of fuel for the newly designed small-modular biomass power system (SMB), BioMax 15.

Contact: Sarah Holmes Barba
sarah_barba@nrel.gov
303-275-3023
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

1-Jul-2001
XMM-Newton makes unusual discoveries in Andromeda Galaxy
In its first look at the Andromeda Galaxy, known as M31, the X-ray multi-mirror satellite observatory has revealed several unusual X-ray sources.

Contact: Sergey P. Trudolyubov
tsp@lanl.gov
505-665-0019
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Showing stories 451-475 out of 496 stories.
<< < 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 > >>

 

 

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