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Features Archive

Showing stories 476-486 out of 486 stories.
<< < 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20

1-May-2001
MIC researchers escape gravity
Three researchers from IPRT's Microanalytical Instrumentation Center recently flew on NASA's KC-135 reduced-gravity aircraft to test a new system for determining levels of treatment chemicals in water. It's part of an effort to develop novel instrumentation for monitoring the quality of spacecraft drinking water.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

24-Apr-2001
New technology could spur growth in photovoltaic panels
Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have surpassed two records in solar cell design, paving the way toward reducing the cost of photovoltaics systems that produce electricity directly from sunlight.

Contact: Sarah Holmes Barba
sarah_barba@nrel.gov
303-275-3023
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

1-Apr-2001
Lab-built components bound for outerspace
Jerry Hand and Jim Safly, two Ames Laboratory machinists , have been busy fabricating components for equipment designed to test and monitor the quality of spacecraft drinking water.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

1-Apr-2001
The oldest, farthest type Ia supernova was a lucky catch
Berkeley Lab astrophysicist Peter Nugent, working with Adam Riess of the Space Telescope Science Institute, used an IBM SP supercomputer at NERSC to analyze data from an exploding star that had been caught once on purpose and twice by accident by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope.

Contact: Ron Kolb
rrkolb@lbl.gov
510-486-7586
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

1-Feb-2001
Ames Lab scientists win Energy 100 Awards
Ames Laboratory research was recognized on the Energy 100 Awards list. Number 24 on the top-100 list was photonic bandgap structures, which was one of only three discoveries and innovations recognized in 1990. Lead-free solder was 36th on the list; one of only two research projects recognized in 1994. Magnetic refrigeration made the 59th spot on the list and was one of 10 discoveries and innovations recognized in 1997.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

1-Jan-2001
Joint institute for nanoscience planned
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the University of Washington are preparing to form a joint institute in early 2001 that will bring together the resources of both institutions to pursue major discoveries in nanoscience and nanotechnology.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jan-2001
Study of ice leads to cool new research
Scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory who studied how ice on comets can store large quantities of gas and release them as the comets near the sun are applying the same approach to new research. They're learning more about how nano-structures could be used to control and enhance chemical reactivity.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Dec-2000
Random acts of brightness
Costas Soukoulis, an Ames Laboratory senior physicis and former Iowa State University graduate student Xunya Jiang, now working at DiCon Fiberoptics, Inc., near Berkeley, Calif., have developed a theoretical model that simulates the phenomenon of random lasing, in which photons that follow random paths create a multiple-light-scattering laser.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

31-Dec-2000
The stuff that came in from the cold
Despite the best efforts of particle physicists and astrophysicists, most of the Universe is still missing. We know where it is, but we don't know what it is. It is all around us, but we can only see it by looking far, far away. That is the challenge for the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS).

Contact: Judy Jackson
jjackson@fnal.gov
630-840-4112
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

31-Dec-1999
Evaluating vehicle emissions controls
ORNL researchers are developing software tools for supercomputers that will simulate engine exhaust from various lean-burn diesel and gasoline engines as it flows through envisioned catalytic converters designed to chemically transform pollutants into harmless emissions.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

31-Dec-1999
Polymers plus quasicrystals — A puzzling interaction
Sometimes trying something that really shouldn't work can lead to an amazing discovery. That's what happened to Valerie Sheares, an Ames Laboratory associate and Iowa State University assistant professor of chemistry. The discovery, a polymer-quasicrystal composite, has the best characteristics of each of the constituent parts. It's opened the door for a variety of innovative uses. Why it works, however, remains a puzzle—one that Sheares is eager to solve.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Showing stories 476-486 out of 486 stories.
<< < 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20

 

 

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