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Features Archive


Showing stories 51-75 out of 409 stories.
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8-Feb-2016
Three ways to bust ghostly dark matter
Dark matter hunters around the world pursue three approaches to look for fingerprints of ghostly WIMPs: on the Earth's surface, underground and in space. Researchers from the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory will take part in a discussion of the global search for dark matter particles at this year's AAAS Annual Meeting, to be held Feb. 11-15 in Washington, D.C.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

4-Feb-2016
Canfield to head APS Condensed Matter Division
Ames Laboratory physicist Paul Canfield has always been a vocal proponent of his field, condensed matter physics, but he's about to take it up a notch. In March, Canfield will begin a four-year leadership stint heading up the Condensed Matter Physics Division of the American Physical Society. APS recently announced that Canfield had been elected vice-chair of the CMP division.

Contact: Kerry Gibson
kgibson@ameslab.gov
515-294-1405
DOE/Ames Laboratory

3-Feb-2016
A mile-deep campus
Students at South Dakota universities can study physics at Sanford Underground Research Facility, which doubles as essentially the first college campus located a mile underground.

Contact: Andre Salles
media@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

1-Feb-2016
Nondestructive testing: Sandia looks inside composites
Sandia National Laboratories is developing nondestructive testing methods to detect possible hidden damage inside lightweight composite materials.

Contact: Sue Holmes
sholmes@sandia.gov
505-844-6362
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

28-Jan-2016
Is the neutrino its own antiparticle?
Almost every particle has an antimatter counterpart: a particle with the same mass but opposite charge, among other qualities. But certain characteristics of neutrinos and antineutrinos make scientists wonder: Are they one and the same? Are neutrinos their own antiparticles?

Contact: Andre Salles
media@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

25-Jan-2016
Cracking cases
A group of nuclear detectives at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory takes on tough challenges, from detecting illicit uranium using isotopic 'fingerprints' to investigating Presidential assassination conspiracies. 'A very big capability at Oak Ridge exists for nuclear analytics, all the way from helping commercial production of nuclear power to making sure the world's nuclear materials are properly accounted for,' said ORNL's Joseph Giaquinto, leader of the Nuclear Analytical Chemistry and Isotopics Laboratories.

Contact: Dawn Levy
levyd@ornl.gov
865-576-6448
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

25-Jan-2016
How to find and study black holes
Black holes sound too strange to be real. But they are actually pretty common in space. There are dozens known and probably millions more in the Milky Way and a billion times that lurking outside. The makings and dynamics of these monstrous warpings of spacetime have been confounding scientists for centuries.

Contact: Andre Salles
media@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

21-Jan-2016
Higher speed, more precision
In just a little over a year of operation, the US Department of Energy Ames Laboratory's dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer has successfully characterized materials at the atomic scale level with more speed and precision than ever possible before.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

21-Jan-2016
Explore galaxies far, far away at internet speeds
Scientists have released an 'expansion pack' for a virtual tour of the universe that you can enjoy from the comfort of your own computer. The latest version of the publicly accessible images of the sky, which can be viewed using an interactive Sky Viewer tool, roughly doubles the size of the searchable universe from the project's original release in May.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

19-Jan-2016
ORNL researchers use neutrons to gain insight into battery inefficiency
Scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory are improving the lifetimes of rechargeable batteries that run on lithium, a small atom that can pack tightly into graphite anode materials. The valuable ions are depleted as a battery charges, and they are also lost to the formation of a thin coating on a battery's anode during initial charging. ORNL researchers used two powerful neutron science facilities to try to understand the dynamics behind this phenomenon.

Contact: Dawn Levy
levyd@ornl.gov
865-576-6448
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

15-Jan-2016
ORNL's thermal cameras snoop beneath surfaces to reveal materials' secrets
In 1995, the Department of Energy's Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composite program, led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, bought a high-speed infrared camera -- one of the first available for purchase outside the military. Since then, ORNL has acquired at least 10 additional IR cameras for use in a spectrum of projects. The cameras have mapped changing temperatures as heat flows through objects from gears to artwork.

Contact: Dawn Levy
levyd@ornl.gov
865-576-6448
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

9-Jan-2016
Four Ames Laboratory physicists named 'highly cited' by Thomson Reuters
Four Ames Laboratory physicists -- Paul Canfield, Sergey Bud'ko, Thomas Koschny, and Costas Soukoulis -- were recently named to Thomson Reuters' Highly Cited Researchers 2015.

Contact: Laura Millsaps
millsaps@ameslab.gov
515-294-3474
DOE/Ames Laboratory

8-Jan-2016
SLAC's Stanley Brodsky shares Pomeranchuk Prize for theoretical physics
Stan Brodsky, a professor of particle physics and astrophysics at Stanford University and the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, has received the 2015 Pomeranchuk Prize from the Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP) in Moscow, Russia. He shares the award with Russian physicist Victor Fadin.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

6-Jan-2016
ORNL on team officially recognized for elements 115, 117 discovery
The International Union for Pure and Applied Chemistry has announced formal verification of four new chemical elements, recognizing the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and its collaborators for the discovery of elements 115 and 117.

Contact: Morgan McCorkle
mccorkleml@ornl.gov
865-574-7308
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

16-Dec-2015
A collaboration bears fruit as W7-X celebrates first research plasma
Scientists from the US Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and other national laboratories joined colleagues from around the world at the celebration for the first plasma of the Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) stellarator at the Max Planck Institute in Greifswald, Germany.

Contact: Jeanne Jackson DeVoe
jjackson@pppl.gov
609-243-2757
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

15-Dec-2015
Schweickhard 'Schwick' von Goeler dies at 84
Schweickhard 'Schwick' von Goeler, an award-winning physicist at the US Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) for more than 35 years and the inventor of numerous X-ray diagnostics used in fusion experiments worldwide, died of leukemia on Dec. 6 in Springfield, Massachusetts. He was 84.

Contact: Jeanne Jackson DeVoe
jjackson@pppl.gov
609-751-1821
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

14-Dec-2015
LUX experiment draws best picture yet of what dark matter particles cannot be
The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) dark matter experiment, which operates nearly a mile underground at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in the Black Hills of South Dakota, has already proven itself to be the most sensitive dark matter detector in the world. Now scientists have significantly enhanced its ability to look for WIMPs, or weakly interacting massive particles, which are among the leading candidates for dark matter.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon72@gmail.com
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

14-Dec-2015
Bernard named communications director of the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory
Larry Bernard, a proven developer of strategic communications programs, has been named director of communications for the US Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), effective Dec. 14.

Contact: Raphael Rosen
rrosen@pppl.gov
609-243-3317
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

9-Dec-2015
To get more oomph from an electron gun, tip it with diamondoids
They sound like futuristic weapons, but electron guns are actually workhorse tools for research and industry: They emit streams of electrons for electron microscopes, semiconductor patterning equipment and particle accelerators, to name a few important uses. Now scientists at Stanford University and the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have figured out how to increase these electron flows 13,000-fold by applying a single layer of diamondoids -- tiny, perfect diamond cages -- to an electron gun's sharp gold tip.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

9-Dec-2015
Mr. Rare Earth easing into retirement
When Karl A. Gschneidner Jr. began work on his Ph.D. at Iowa State University and hired on as an Ames Laboratory graduate researcher in metallurgy, Dwight Eisenhower was serving his first term in the White House. Now, more than six decades later, Gschneidner is formally retiring effective Jan. 5, 2016 after a distinguished career that led him to become internationally recognized as Mr. Rare Earth.

Contact: Kerry Gibson
kgibson@ameslab.gov
515-294-1405
DOE/Ames Laboratory

8-Dec-2015
Producing cold electron beams to increase collision rates at the relativistic heavy ion collider
Accelerated ion beams heat up. This causes a problem for physicists trying to get the particles to collide. So physicists at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, a nuclear physics research facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory, are exploring ways to cool the beams and keep their particles tightly packed.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

25-Nov-2015
Postdoc Alesha Harris: Tackling chemistry from nanoparticles to neutrinos
Alesha Harris has three degrees in chemistry and has taught the subject in her home state of Texas. Although her graduate work was in nanoparticles -- materials just a billionth of a meter in size -- she joined Brookhaven National Laboratory as an Alliance for Graduate Education and the Professoriate-Transformation (AGEP-T) postdoc working with Minfang Yeh, who leads the neutrino and nuclear chemistry group. Before becoming acquainted with Brookhaven Lab and Yeh's work, Harris had never heard of the mysterious neutrinos, invisible subatomic particles.

Contact: Kay Cordtz
kcordtz@bnl.gov
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

23-Nov-2015
PPPL engineers build mirror mechanism using 3-D-printer and off-the-shelf parts
At the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, the spirit of tinkering lives. This past summer a team of engineers invented a mechanical device designed to be installed on ITER, the multinational fusion machine being built in the south of France, using 3-D printing and parts bought at Walmart.

Contact: Raphael Rosen
rrosen@pppl.gov
609-243-3317
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

18-Nov-2015
Rob Goldston wins 2015 Nuclear Fusion Award for best paper published in 2012
Rob Goldston wins the 2015 Nuclear Fusion Award for best paper published in 2012.

Contact: John Greenwald
jgreenwa@pppl.gov
609-243-2672
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

18-Nov-2015
Q&A: SLAC theorist Lance Dixon explains quantum gravity
In this Q&A, Particle Physics and Astrophysics Professor Lance Dixon of Stanford University and the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory explains one approach to developing such a theory, called quantum gravity.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Showing stories 51-75 out of 409 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>


 

 

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