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US Department of Energy National Science Bowl


Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive


Showing stories 76-100 out of 390 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 > >>


5-Oct-2015
DOE announces funding for new center for computational materials sciences at Brookhaven Lab
The US Department of Energy (DOE) has announced $12 million in funding over the next four years for a new Center for Computational Design of Functional Strongly Correlated Materials and Theoretical Spectroscopy at Brookhaven National Laboratory and Rutgers University. Center scientists will develop next-generation methods and software to accurately describe electronic properties in complex strongly correlated materials, as well as a companion database to predict targeted properties with energy-related application to thermoelectric materials.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

1-Oct-2015
Ames Laboratory scientists create an all-organic UV on-chip spectrometer
The US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory has developed a near ultra-violet and all-organic light emitting diode that can be used as an on-chip photosensor.

Contact: Laura Millsaps
millsaps@ameslab.gov
515-294-9750
DOE/Ames Laboratory

30-Sep-2015
ORNL microscopy finds evidence of high-temperature superconductivity in single layer
Electron microscopy at is pointing researchers closer to the development of ultra-thin materials that transfer electrons with no resistance at relatively high temperatures.

Contact: Morgan McCorkle
mccorkleml@ornl.gov
865-574-7308
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

29-Sep-2015
Titan helps unpuzzle decades-old plutonium perplexities
First produced in 1940, plutonium is one of the most electronically complicated elements on Earth -- and because of its complexities, scientists have been struggling to prove the existence of its magnetic properties ever since. Finally, that struggle is over, thanks to a timely combination of theory, algorithm and code developments, neutrons experiments, and Titan -- the second-most-powerful supercomputer in the world.

Contact: Jeremy Rumsey
rumseyjp@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

29-Sep-2015
Building champions: National Science Bowl offseason
Five-time National Science Bowl champion Mira Loma HS keeps an intense -- and pizza fueled -- training regimen through the summer and fall.

Contact: Ethan Alpern
ethan.alpern@science.doe.gov
202-586-4307
DOE/Office of Scientific and Technical Information

25-Sep-2015
Feng Lin wins Spicer Award for smart window, battery research
Feng Lin, a former postdoctoral researcher at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, has been selected to receive the annual William E. and Diane M. Spicer Young Investigator Award for X-ray experiments at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory that led to new approaches in the design of energy-efficient, color-changing 'smart' windows and high-capacity lithium-ion batteries.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

24-Sep-2015
Los Alamos explores hybrid ultrasmall gold nanocluster for enzymatic fuel cells
With fossil-fuel sources dwindling, better biofuel cell design is a strong candidate in the energy field. In research published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, Los Alamos researchers and external collaborators synthesized and characterized a new DNA-templated gold nanocluster (AuNC) that could resolve a critical methodological barrier for efficient biofuel cell design.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

23-Sep-2015
Mysterious neutrinos take the stage at SLAC
To find out more about the elusive particles and their potential links to cosmic evolution, invisible dark matter and matter's dominance over antimatter in the universe, the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is taking on key roles in four neutrino experiments: EXO, DUNE, MicroBooNE and ICARUS.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

23-Sep-2015
Muon g-2 magnet successfully cooled down and powered up
Two years ago, scientists on the Muon g-2 experiment successfully brought a fragile, expensive and complex 17-ton electromagnet on a 3,200-mile land and sea trek from Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York to Fermilab in Illinois. This week, the ring -- now installed in a new, specially designed building at Fermilab -- was successfully cooled down to operating temperature (minus 450 degrees Fahrenheit) and powered up, proving that even after a decade of inactivity, it remains a vital and viable scientific instrument.

Contact: Andre Salles
media@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
Doe-Anderson

14-Sep-2015
Scientists use lasers to simulate shock effects of meteorite impact on silica
Scientists used high-power laser beams at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory to simulate the shock effects of a meteorite impact in silica, one of the most abundant materials in the Earth's crust. They observed, for the first time, its shockingly fast transformation into the mineral stishovite -- a rare, extremely hard and dense form of silica.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

8-Sep-2015
Making the most from carbon in plants
Researchers are looking for more effective ways to get at all the carbon in biomass to create more energy and biochemicals. However, a lot of the carbon is in lignin -- support tissues in plants, which makes up about a third of the biomass. International teams of scientists are utilizing EMSL's expertise and capabilities to better understand how lignin can be efficiently deconstructed to release its carbon for a more renewable and sustainable energy future.

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

4-Sep-2015
Fortifying computer chips for space travel
One of the most long-lived and active space-chip testing programs is at the Berkeley Lab. Since 1979, most American satellites and many major NASA projects including the Mars Rover Curiosity, the space shuttles, and the new Orion capsule, have had one or more electronic components go through Berkeley Lab's cyclotron.

Contact: Jon Weiner
jrweiner@lbl.gov
510-486-4014
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

3-Sep-2015
Researchers see 'spin current' in motion for the first time
Researchers at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have for the first time seen a spin current -- an inherent magnetic property common to all electrons -- as it travels across materials. The result, which revealed a surprising loss of current along the way, is an important step toward realizing a next-generation breed of electronics known as 'spintronics.'

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

21-Aug-2015
Brookhaven summer intern reveals the cutting edge of NSLS-II
This summer, DOE's Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship program paired Bozeat with NSLS-II engineer Christopher Eng, who enlisted the student's help in designing the magnet assemblies that comprise NSLS-II's undulators -- devices that wiggle the electron beam to emit brighter X-rays.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

14-Aug-2015
The critical second: CMI's second year doubles research milestones
The Department of Energy's Critical Materials Institute, led by Ames Laboratory, has more than doubled its research accomplishments in its second year, bringing the total number of invention disclosures to 34. The CMI addresses possible of shortages in rare-earth and other materials necessary for clean energy technologies like wind turbines, electric vehicles, efficient lighting, advanced batteries, and other products used by Americans every day.

Contact: Laura Millsaps
millsaps@ameslab.gov
515-294-3474
DOE/Ames Laboratory

13-Aug-2015
The pressure is on
Researchers with Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Spallation Neutron Source have developed technology to squeeze materials with a million times the pressure of the earth's atmosphere while studying them with neutrons. When they bombard these materials with neutrons, the materials provide an unprecedented picture of the changing nature of matter under extreme pressure.

Contact: Leo Williams
williamsjl2@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

12-Aug-2015
Microscopic rake doubles efficiency of low-cost solar cells
Researchers from the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University have developed a manufacturing technique that could double the electricity output of inexpensive solar cells by using a microscopic rake when applying light-harvesting polymers.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

11-Aug-2015
Eyes on the prize
Recently, the Department of Energy Office of Science's Nanoscale Science Research Centers at Argonne, Brookhaven, Lawrence Berkeley, Los Alamos/Sandia and Oak Ridge national laboratories jointly organized a workshop at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to discuss opportunities and challenges as imaging and data sciences merge. Those efforts will likely aid the Materials Genome Initiative, which aims to speed new materials to the global marketplace.

Contact: Dawn Levy
levyd@ornl.gov
865-576-6448
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

5-Aug-2015
SLAC builds one of the world's fastest 'electron cameras'
A new scientific instrument at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory promises to capture some of nature's speediest processes. It uses a method known as ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) and can reveal motions of electrons and atomic nuclei within molecules that take place in less than a tenth of a trillionth of a second -- information that will benefit groundbreaking research in materials science, chemistry and biology.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

28-Jul-2015
Rigors of the road: ORNL invention will support licensing and transport of spent nuclear fuel
With support from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have devised the Cyclic Integrated Reversible-bending Fatigue Tester. Combined with ongoing fuel transportation research, data from the CIRFT system will help facilitate cask designs and transportation protocols that ensure safe transportation of spent nuclear fuel.

Contact: Dawn Levy
levyd@ornl.gov
865-576-6448
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

27-Jul-2015
Brookhaven Lab summer school helps develop tomorrow's nuclear chemistry experts
For the past six weeks, 12 college students have had the opportunity to learn all that the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory has to teach about a vital but often overlooked area of chemistry -- one that spans everything from nuclear reactors and the safe handling of nuclear material to hospital diagnostic tools and cutting-edge medical research.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

10-Jul-2015
New design could dramatically boost efficiency of low-cost solar panels
A new material design tested in experiments at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory could make low-cost solar panels far more efficient by greatly enhancing their ability to collect the sun's energy and release it as electricity.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

9-Jul-2015
It all comes to light
New advances, including light sources, allow for non-destructive techniques for examining old artifacts.

Contact: Ethan Alpern
ethan.alpern@science.doe.gov
202-586-4307
DOE/US Department of Energy

7-Jul-2015
Big PanDA and Titan merge to tackle torrent of LHC's full-energy collision data
With the successful restart of the Large Hadron Collider, now operating at nearly twice its former collision energy, comes an enormous increase in the volume of data physicists must sift through to search for new discoveries. Fortunately, a remarkable data-management tool developed by physicists at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the University of Texas at Arlington is evolving to meet the big-data challenge.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

6-Jul-2015
Scientists drive tiny shock waves through diamond
Researchers have used an X-ray laser to record, in detail never possible before, the microscopic motion and effects of shock waves rippling across diamond. The technique, developed at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, allows scientists to precisely explore the complex physics driving massive star explosions, which are critical for understanding fusion energy, and to improve scientific models used to study these phenomena.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Showing stories 76-100 out of 390 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 > >>


 

 

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