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Features Archive


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22-Jul-2014
Sandia ensures US nuclear weapons deterrent can remain effective, credible
As part of its mission of ensuring the nation's stockpile is safe, secure and effective as a deterrent, Sandia National Laboratories must make sure crucial parts can function if they're hit by radiation, especially a type called fast neutrons. It created a science-based program called QASPR, which combines computer modeling and simulation, and experiments and technology development.

Contact: Sue Holmes
sholmes@sandia.gov
505-844-6362
DOE/Ames Laboratory

6-May-2014
What lies beneath
The effects of biogeochemical and geochemical processes in the ground under us are on massive scales. Understanding what's going on down there and how it effects what's going on up here is an enormous undertaking. Scientists working at EMSL are getting a handle on these gigantic macroscopic processes by focusing on the microscopic scale. By creating micromodels and incorporating supercomputer simulations, researchers are connecting the molecular level with processes that affect our entire ecosystem.

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

15-Apr-2014
Wind tunnel tests support improved aerodynamic design of B61-12 bomb
Sandia National Laboratories has finished eight days of testing a full-scale mock unit representing the aerodynamic characteristics of the B61-12 gravity bomb in a wind tunnel. The tests on the mock-up were done to establish the configuration that will deliver the necessary spin motion of the bomb during freefall and are an important milestone in the Life Extension Program to deliver a new version of the aging system, the B61-12.

Contact: Sue Holmes
sholmes@sandia.gov
505-844-6362
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

16-Jan-2014
Sandia conducts first impact test in years of B61 nonnuclear components
Sandia National Laboratories tests a ground-penetrating bomb, minus its nuclear components, in a rocket-driven impact test.

Contact: Sue Holmes
sholmes@sandia.gov
505-844-6362
DOE/Ames Laboratory

15-Jan-2013
Sandia airborne pods seek to trace nuclear bomb's origins
If a nuclear device were to unexpectedly detonate anywhere on Earth, the ensuing effort to find out who made the weapon probably would be led by aircraft rapidly collecting airborne radioactive particles for analysis.

Contact: Neal Singer
nsinger@sandia.gov
505-845-7078
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

11-Jan-2012
Biofuels from bacteria is biochemist's goal
Environmental proteomics does not just aid development of new biofuels but helps further understanding of the impact of climate change and the use of organisms for bioremediation.

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

21-Apr-2011
From fork to farm
Sandia National Laboratories' food-waste composting program keeps leftovers out of the landfill.

Contact: Stephanie Holinka
slholin@sandia.gov
505-284-9227
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

23-Jun-2009
Green chemistry: Using lasers to detect explosives and hazardous waste
Berkeley Lab scientists are pioneering laser ablation techniques that can detect explosives and hazardous waste in seconds, with no chemical waste. The technology can save the lives of soldiers, keep children safe from toys illegally coated with lead paints, and protect workers from chemical poisoning.

Contact: Allan Chen
A_chen@lbl.gov
510-486-4210
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

18-Mar-2008
DOE announces strategic Engineering and Technology Roadmap for cleanup of Cold War era nuclear waste
The US Department of Energy released an Engineering and Technology Roadmap, which details initiatives aimed at reducing the technical risks and uncertainties associated with cleaning up Cold War era nuclear waste over the next ten years.

Contact: Joann Wardrip
202-586-4940
DOE/US Department of Energy

15-Jun-2007
PNNL aims to move fast chemical weapon agentsensing technique from lab-top to prototype
In the same amount of time it takes to download software or print a picture, you now can detect a chemical weapon agent. Needless to say, technology is cool.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

12-Jun-2006
Managing the Soviet legacy
An intact nuclear weapon is stolen and detonated. A terrorist group somehow steals, purchases, or produces fissile material and fabricates a crude bomb, called an improvised nuclear device, which the group threatens to detonate if its demands are not met.

Contact: Carolyn H. Krause
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

22-Aug-2005
Testing the physics of nuclear isomers
FOR much of the past century, physicists have searched for methods to control the release of energy stored in an atom's nucleus.

Contact: Science & Technology
str-mail@llnl.gov
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

19-Aug-2005
Finding the next small thing
ORNL "nanoscopes" are among the tools that may help researchers construct materials as elastic and durable as a butterfly's wing.

Contact: Carolyn H. Krause
202-362-6211
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

5-Apr-2005
Seismic detectives go underground
Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are using data gathered by seismology stations to develop a mathematical framework for identifying and locating seismological events around the world. Their work, part of the National Nuclear Security Administration's Ground Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Research and Engineering Program, will be used by the U.S. government to monitor explosions and weapons tests.

Contact: Virginia Sliman
virginia.sliman@pnl.gov
509-375-4372
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

5-Apr-2005
Recycling a legacy of the Cold War
The tons of surplus plutonium stockpiled in the United States and the former Soviet Union are no longer of interest to anyone...except perhaps terrorists. This realization led to an agreement between the United States and the Russian Federation to dispose of 35 metric tons of plutonium each by removing the plutonium "pits" from the nuclear weapons and turning them into nuclear power plant fuel.

Contact: Virginia Sliman
virginia.sliman@pnl.gov
509-375-4372
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

24-Mar-2005
Enhanced national security through international research collaborations
National security today requires broad and effective engagement in the international arena.

Contact: Science & Technology Review
str-mail@llnl.gov
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

11-Mar-2005
Shaping future
In its next-generation aircraft carrier, the Navy, with assistance from Sandia, is seeking to reduce manpower by 10 to 30 percent, but not by heaping more work on individual sailors. The goal is to use increased technology and improvements to carrier air wing flight operations, maintenance, and support functions to reduce the overall workload per sailor.

Contact: Michael Padilla
mjpadil@sandia.gov
505-284-5325
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

10-Nov-2004
Piloting the pipeline
R pal. The automated pipeline. Mass spec and proteomics. These phrases are used by ORNL researchers who probe microbes to determine what these "bugs" are made of and what drives them.

Contact: ORNL Review
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

10-Nov-2004
New tools of analysis
In the mid-1990s at Ohio State University, Dorothea Thompson studied a single gene and a single promoter regulating that gene as part of her doctoral thesis research.

Contact: ORNL Review
krausech@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Nov-2004
Laser burrows into the Earth to destroy land mines
ONE of the great scourges of warfare is the land mine. Although an effective battlefield weapon, land mines kill or maim nearly 45,000 civilians (including 20,000 children) worldwide every year.

Contact: Mark Rotter
rotter1@llnl.gov
925-422-8370
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

1-Nov-2004
Detecting bioaerosols when time is of the essence
About seven years ago, Livermore researchers received seed funding from the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program to develop an instrument that counters bioterrorism by providing a rapid early warning system for pathogens, such as anthrax.

Contact: Richard Langlois
langlois1@llnl.gov
925-422-5616
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

1-Jun-2004
SARS foam- Sandia foams fight SARS virus
In a series of tests conducted at Kansas State University on Bovine coronavirus (BCV) -- the internationally accepted surrogate for the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) coronavirus -- Sandia versions of its DF- 200 formulation fully inactivated samples in one minute or less.

Contact: John German
jdgerma@sandia.gov
505-844-5199
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

1-Jun-2004
Synthetic aperture radar- MiniSAR offers promise
Weighing less than 30 pounds, Sandia National Laboratories' miniSAR (synthetic aperture radar) will be onefourth the weight and one-tenth the volume of conventional SARs that now fly on larger unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). It is the latest design produced by Sandia in a history that involves more than 20 years of related research and development.

Contact: Chris Burroughs
coburro@sandia.gov
505-844-0948
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

1-Jun-2004
Tag-on sensor- Eliminating 'friendly fire' during combat
Building on more than 10 years of research and development, Sandia engineers have created a radar tag sensor that can be mounted on military vehicles and is recognizable to an attack aircraft as a "friendly."

Contact: Michael Padilla
mjpadil@sandia.gov
505-284-5325
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

5-Apr-2004
On the front lines of biodefense
The Laboratory's pathogen bioinformatics group is developing ways to rapidly identify microbes that could pose a threat to the nation's citizens, livestock, and crops.

Contact: Thomas Slezak
slezak1@llnl.gov
925-422-5746
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Showing stories 1-25 out of 56 stories.
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