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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Features Archive

Showing stories 26-50 out of 54 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 > >>

17-Jun-2003
At Los Alamos: Guarding the air we breathe
It's a sunny morning in late June. Tourists and locals throng midtown Manhattan, near Central Park South. The air carries a mix of aromas--sweet scents from blossoming trees in Central Park, a potpourri of ethnic foods from nearby restaurants, the pungent blend of sauerkraut and roasting hot dogs from a street vendor. But unscented and unnoted by the crowds, the air is also laced with anthrax spores from a bioterrorist attack.

Contact: Bill Dupuy
wdupuy@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

9-Dec-2002
Los Alamos announces Homeland Security Center and staff
Los Alamos National Laboratory's Laboratory's Center for Homeland Security will be the key contact point at the Laboratory for organizations seeking scientific and technical assistance in areas related to Homeland Security.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

15-Jul-2002
Tiny device can detect hidden nuclear weapons
A small, portable detector for finding concealed nuclear weapons and materials has been developed by the Argonne National Laboratory. When fully developed, the device could assist international inspectors charged with preventing smuggling and unauthorized use of nuclear weapons and materials.

Contact: Catherine Foster
cfoster@anl.gov
630-252-5580
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

20-May-2002
At Los Alamos: Tracking the identity and origin of biological threats
Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Northern Arizona University and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have developed sophisticated tools to analyze and identify the DNA of biological threat agents, including those that cause anthrax and plague.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Apr-2002
Bright future for tactical laser weapons
In a demonstration at the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico, the solid-state heat-capacity laser (SSHCL) burned a 1-centimeter-diameter hole straight through a 2-centimeter-thick stack of steel samples in 6 seconds. The electrical current to do so came from a wall outlet and cost no more than 30 cents. While large chemical lasers have successfully shot down tactical rockets, the SSHCL design supports the weight and size requirements for a future mobile deployment.

Contact: C. Brent Dane
dane1@llnl.gov
925-424-5905
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

1-Apr-2002
Quantum simulations tell the atomic-level story
With quantum molecular dynamics simulations, scientists can get an accurate picture of what happens to individual atoms during an experiment.

Contact: Giulia Galli
galli@llnl.gov
925-423-4223
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

11-Mar-2002
Hand-held radiation detector could outsmart terrorists
Engineers at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley, Lawrence Livermore, and Los Alamos National Laboratories have developed a 10-pound, battery-powered radiation detector called Cryo3 that is intended to outsmart anyone trying to smuggle radioactive material into the country.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
L-Gel decontaminates better than bleach
Scientists have developed a material that is safe for people and the environment but deadly to the agents of biological and chemical warfare.

Contact: Dave Leary
learyl@llnl.gov
925-422-9655
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Modernizing the military
From software to identification systems, diagnostics to emergency management, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has developed technologies that could support the military as it moves into the 21st century.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Border training helps reduce dangerous smuggling
A joint program between the U.S. Customs Service and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory provides training to foreign border guards, customs patrol and frontier police on how to spot red flags that should trigger a search, as well as how to use specialized technology to detect and identify items used to make nuclear, chemical or biological weapons of mass destruction.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Airport security scanner for safer skies
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers have spent more than 12 years developing a Personal Security Scanner that allows security guards to "see" concealed weapons, including plastic explosives and other nonmetallic threats.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Mar-2002
Assessing every breath you take
Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have developed a sophisticated modeling system that assesses health and safety impacts of contaminated indoor air.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Jan-2002
Rapid field detection of biological agents
Livermore scientists have developed two portable biodetection systems to help in the fight against bioterrorism.

Contact: Dave Leary
learyl@llnl.gov
925-422-9655
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
Biothreat detection takes concentration
Detecting potential biological threats is part of the Department of Energy's plan for homeland defense, and a new automated device developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory provides a key piece in biothreat detection technology.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
Spectrometers — versatile tools for weapons detection
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is using four kinds of spectroscopies to develop sensors that can be used to detect weapons of mass destruction: mass spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, neutron spectro-scopy and optical spectroscopy.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

31-Dec-2001
A partner in peace
At Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, however, many researchers are working on programs aimed at keeping people safe and the world at peace. We asked Mike Kluse, Associate Laboratory Director for Pacific Northwest's National Security Directorate, about the Laboratory's role as a partner in peace and what has changed since the tragic events of Sept. 11.

Contact: Greg Koller
Greg.koller@pnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

1-Nov-2001
Project to help combat bioterrorism
Thanks to scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory, the nation's veterinarians will soon have access to Web-based information that will help them diagnose animal disease outbreaks.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

1-Nov-2001
Backyard bacteria rout a stubborn toxin
In a portion of fractured basalt more than 200 feet below the surface of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory lies a highly concentrated sludge of the heavy liquid toxin trichloroethene (TCE). INEEL engineers are determined to rid the rock of the toxic solvent which, over more than 30 years, has gradually leached into the groundwater of the Snake River aquifer.

Contact: Teri Ehresman
ehr@inel.gov
208-526-7785
DOE/Idaho National Laboratory

1-Oct-2001
Structural biologists provides a close look at ribosomes
Biologists working at Argonne’s Structural Biology Center (SBC) recently examined components of these protein factories with X-ray crystallography at resolutions high enough to determine the position and interaction of individual atoms. These images are the culmination of four decades of work in elucidating how the ribosome creates proteins.

Contact: Evelyn Brown
eabrown@anl.gov
630-252-5510
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

1-Aug-2001
Lab builds world's first neptunium sphere
For the first time ever, a cross-section of nuclear materials scientists and technicians at the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research (CMR) facility has fashioned an eight- kilogram tungsten-and nickel-clad sphere of neptunium. The actinide metal sphere will be used in criticality safety and nuclear non-proliferation experiments at Technical Area 18, the critical experiments facility.

Contact: Larry Ussery
LUSSERY@LANL.GOV
505-665-0207
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

20-Jun-2001
2001 Discover Magazine Innovation Awards
Discover Magazine and the Christopher Columbus Foundation recognized scientists at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in a ceremony today for developing two innovative technologies that will address vital health and humanitarian issues.

Contact: Staci Maloof
Staci.Maloof@pnl.gov
509-372-6313
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

20-Jun-2001
Scientists push enzyme evolution into high gear
The Brookhaven study offers insight into how enzymes evolve and may one day lead to methods to boost production of other useful plant products.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

19-Jun-2001
Microbe probe
ORNL researchers are using gene chips, mass spectrometry, and computational analysis to understand what microbe genes do.

Contact: Billy Stair
stairb@ornl.gov
865-574-4160
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
Early detection for protection
Being able to rapidly detect biological agents is among the most difficult and yet urgent tasks facing the nation. Whether the threat is from a natural outbreak or a terrorist's release of threat agents, medical treatment cannot effectively begin without first identifying the bioagent. At the same time, effective understanding and response to a biological threat requires rapid communication across the health-care system.

Contact: Paul Jackson
pjjackson@lanl.gov
505-667-2775
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

1-Jun-2001
Microbial diversity
They have been called the foundation of the biosphere, invisible yet essential. And now researchers know bacteria are unimaginably abundant but just don 't know exactly who they are.

Contact: Cheryl Kuske
kuske@lanl.gov
505-665-4800
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Showing stories 26-50 out of 54 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 > >>

 

 

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