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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

NEWS FROM UNIVERSITIES AND OTHER DOE RESEARCH PARTNERS

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 182.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Nature Photonics
Ultra-short X-ray pulses explore the nano world
Ultra-short and extremely strong X-ray flashes, as produced by free-electron lasers, are opening the door to a hitherto unknown world. Scientists are using these flashes to take 'snapshots' of the geometry of tiniest structures, for example the arrangement of atoms in molecules. To improve not only spatial but also temporal resolution further requires knowledge about the precise duration and intensity of the X-ray flashes. An international team of scientists has now tackled this challenge.
German Research Foundation, Bavaria California Technology Center International, Max Planck Research Schools, US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, Science Foundation Ireland, European Union

Contact: Andreas Battenberg
battenberg@zv.tum.de
49-892-891-0510
Technische Universitaet Muenchen

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Researchers get $1.25 million to advance carbon storage
Clemson University researchers and their partners at Georgia Institute of Technology, UNAVCO and Grand Resources Inc. received a $1.25 million award from the Department of Energy to develop technology that will significantly improve the ability to monitor and safeguard geologic carbon storage.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Lawrence C. Murdoch
lmurdoc@clemson.edu
Clemson University

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Optica
A path to brighter images and more efficient LCD displays
University of Utah engineers have developed a polarizing filter that allows in more light, leading the way for mobile device displays that last much longer on a single battery charge and cameras that can shoot in dim light.
NASA, US Department of Energy, Utah Science Technology and Research Economic Development Initiative

Contact: Vince Horiuchi
vincent.horiuchi@utah.edu
801-585-7499
University of Utah

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
Nature Materials
Spiraling light, nanoparticles and insights into life's structure
As hands come in left and right versions that are mirror images of each other, so do the amino acids and sugars within us. But unlike hands, only the left-oriented amino acids and the right-oriented sugars ever make into life as we know it.
Center for Solar and Thermal Energy Conversion, Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Nicole Casal Moore
ncmoore@umich.edu
734-647-7087
University of Michigan

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Journal of the American Chemical Society
Scientists get to the heart of fool's gold as a solar material
As the installation of photovoltaic solar cells continues to accelerate, scientists are looking for inexpensive materials beyond the traditional silicon that can efficiently convert sunlight into electricity. Theoretically, iron pyrite could do the job, but when it works at all, the conversion efficiency remains frustratingly low. Now, a University of Wisconsin-Madison research team explains why that is, in a discovery that suggests how improvements in this promising material could lead to inexpensive yet efficient solar cells.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Song Jin
jin@chem.wisc.edu
608-262-1562
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
Researchers create & control spin waves, lifting prospects for enhanced info processing
A team of NYU and University of Barcelona physicists has developed a method to control the movements occurring within magnetic materials, which are used to store and carry information. The breakthrough could simultaneously bolster information processing while reducing the energy necessary to do so.
National Science Foundation, Army Research Office, US Department of Energy

Contact: James Devitt
james.devitt@nyu.edu
212-998-6808
New York University

Public Release: 11-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Bending -- but not breaking -- in search of new materials
Researchers at Drexel University and Dalian University of Technology in China have chemically engineered a new, electrically conductive nanomaterial that is flexible enough to fold, but strong enough to support many times its own weight. They believe it can be used to improve electrical energy storage, water filtration and radiofrequency shielding in technology from portable electronics to coaxial cables.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Britt Faulstick
bef29@drexel.edu
215-895-2617
Drexel University

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
Getting the salt out
Pitt engineering researchers receive nearly $500,000 DOE grant to explore new cost-effective method to treat high-saline water.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Paul Kovach
pkovach@pitt.edu
412-624-0265
University of Pittsburgh

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
A billion holes can make a battery
Researchers at the University of Maryland have invented a single tiny structure that includes all the components of a battery that they say could bring about the ultimate miniaturization of energy storage components.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Martha Heil
mjheil@umd.edu
301-405-0876
University of Maryland

Public Release: 6-Nov-2014
Science
Transitions between states of matter: It's more complicated, scientists find
The seemingly simple process of phase changes -- those transitions between states of matter -- is more complex than previously known, according to research based at Princeton University, Peking University, and NYU.
Office of Naval Research, Army Research Office, US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation of China

Contact: James Devitt
james.devitt@nyu.edu
212-998-6808
New York University

Public Release: 4-Nov-2014
Dark matter may be massive
Instead of WIMPS or axions, dark matter may be made of macroscopic objects as small as a few ounces up to the size of a good asteroid, and probably as dense as a neutron star or the nucleus of an atom, Case Western Reserve University researchers suggest.
US Department of Energy, Claude Leon Foundation

Contact: Kevin Mayhood
kevin.mayhood@case.edu
216-534-7183
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 3-Nov-2014
Physics Letters B
String field theory could be the foundation of quantum mechanics
Scientists propose a link between string field theory and quantum mechanics that could open the door to using string field theory as the basis of all physics.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Robert Perkins
perkinsr@usc.edu
213-740-9226
University of Southern California

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Uranium-extracting technology for seawater earns research award for grad student
Scientists have long known that seawater contains small concentrations of valuable metals, but a technologically feasible extraction method has remained elusive. The University of Chicago's Carter Abney, a graduate student in chemistry, has been developing materials called metal-organic frameworks to help address the problem.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Steve Koppes
skoppes@uchicago.edu
773-702-8366
University of Chicago

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Science
Science casts light on sex in the orchard
Persimmons are among the small club of plants with separate sexes -- individual trees are either male or female. Now scientists at the UC Davis and Kyoto University in Japan have discovered how sex is determined in a species of persimmon, potentially opening up new possibilities in plant breeding.
Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, US Department of Energy, UC Davis Genome Center

Contact: Andy Fell
ahfell@ucdavis.edu
530-752-4533
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Nano Energy
New solar power material converts 90 percent of captured light into heat
A multidisciplinary engineering team at the University of California, San Diego developed a new nanoparticle-based material for concentrating solar power plants designed to absorb and convert to heat more than 90 percent of the sunlight it captures. The new material can also withstand temperatures greater than 700 degrees Celsius and survive many years outdoors in spite of exposure to air and humidity.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Catherine Hockmuth
chockmuth@ucsd.edu
858-822-1359
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
2014 American Phsyical Society Division of Plasma Physics Meeting
Using radio waves to control the density in a fusion plasma
Experiments show how heating the electrons in the center of a hot fusion plasma with high power microwaves can increase turbulence, reducing the density in the inner core.
US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences

Contact: James Riordon
301-209-3238
American Physical Society

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Scientists' new analysis of plant proteins advances our understanding of photosynthesis
A world without plants would be a world without oxygen, uninhabitable for us and for many creatures. We know plants release oxygen by absorbing carbon dioxide and breaking down water using sunlight through the process of photosynthesis. However, we know little about the mechanics of how plants create oxygen during photosynthesis. A break-through that will help advance our understanding of this critical ecological process was made recently by scientists at Louisiana State University.
US Department of Energy, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Alison Satake
asatake@lsu.edu
225-578-3870
Louisiana State University

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
eLife
Emergent behavior lets bubbles 'sense' environment
Tiny, soapy bubbles can reorganize their membranes to let material flow in and out in response to the surrounding environment, according to researchers at UC Davis and Nanyang Technological University in Singapore. This behavior could be exploited in creating microbubbles that deliver drugs or other payloads inside the body -- and could help us understand how the very first living cells on Earth might have survived billions of years ago.
US Department of Energy, Singapore Ministry of Education

Contact: Andy Fell
ahfell@ucdavis.edu
530-752-4533
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
Lucky star escapes black hole with minor damage
Astronomers have gotten the closest look yet at what happens when a black hole takes a bite out of a star -- and the star lives to tell the tale.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Pam Frost Gorder
gorder.1@osu.edu
614-292-9475
Ohio State University

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
UNL researcher wins federal grant for groundbreaking solar energy project
Jinsong Huang, associate professor of mechanical and materials engineering at University of Nebraska-Lincoln, wins $1.2 million, four-year, award from US Department of Energy SunShot Initiative to refine solar cells that feature perovskite.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Jinsong Huang
jhuang2@unl.edu
402-472-2640
University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
UH researcher wins $1.5 million federal solar energy award
A University of Houston researcher is trying a novel approach to create high efficiency, low cost solar cells in an effort to bring the cost down to that of traditional electricity sources. Venkat Selvamanickam, M.D. Anderson Chair professor of mechanical engineering and director of the Applied Research Hub at the Texas Center for Superconductivity at UH, received a $1,499,994 grant from the U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative to produce high efficiency, inexpensive thin film photovoltaics.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Jeannie Kever
jekever@uh.edu
713-743-0778
University of Houston

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
UT Austin leads $58 million effort to study potential new energy source
A research team led by The University of Texas at Austin has been awarded nearly $58 million to analyze deposits of frozen methane under the Gulf of Mexico that hold enormous potential to increase the world's energy supply.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Anton Caputo
anton.caputo@jsg.utexas.edu
512-232-9623
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Astrophysical Journal
POLARBEAR detects B-modes in the cosmic microwave background
The POLARBEAR experiment has made the most sensitive and precise measurements yet of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background and found telling twists called B-modes in the patterns, signs that this cosmic backlight has been warped by intervening structures in the universe.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Susan Brown
sdbrown@ucsd.edu
858-246-0161
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
Facetless crystals that mimic starfish shells could advance 3-D-printing pills
In a design that mimics a hard-to-duplicate texture of starfish shells, University of Michigan engineers have made rounded crystals that have no facets.
US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, National Science Foundation, Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: Nicole Casal Moore
ncmoore@umich.edu
734-647-7087
University of Michigan

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Nature Materials
Goldilocks principle wrong for particle assembly: Too hot and too cold is just right
Microscopic particles that bind under low temperatures will melt as temperatures rise to moderate levels, but re-connect under hotter conditions, a team of NYU scientists has found. Their discovery points to new ways to create 'smart materials,' cutting-edge materials that adapt to their environment by taking new forms, and to sharpen the detail of 3-D printing.
National Science Foundation, NASA, US Department of Energy

Contact: James Devitt
james.devitt@nyu.edu
212-998-6808
New York University

Showing releases 1-25 out of 182.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

 

 

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