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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

NEWS FROM UNIVERSITIES AND OTHER DOE RESEARCH PARTNERS

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 188.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
Lucky star escapes black hole with minor damage
Astronomers have gotten the closest look yet at what happens when a black hole takes a bite out of a star -- and the star lives to tell the tale.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Pam Frost Gorder
gorder.1@osu.edu
614-292-9475
Ohio State University

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
UNL researcher wins federal grant for groundbreaking solar energy project
Jinsong Huang, associate professor of mechanical and materials engineering at University of Nebraska-Lincoln, wins $1.2 million, four-year, award from US Department of Energy SunShot Initiative to refine solar cells that feature perovskite.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Jinsong Huang
jhuang2@unl.edu
402-472-2640
University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
UH researcher wins $1.5 million federal solar energy award
A University of Houston researcher is trying a novel approach to create high efficiency, low cost solar cells in an effort to bring the cost down to that of traditional electricity sources. Venkat Selvamanickam, M.D. Anderson Chair professor of mechanical engineering and director of the Applied Research Hub at the Texas Center for Superconductivity at UH, received a $1,499,994 grant from the U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative to produce high efficiency, inexpensive thin film photovoltaics.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Jeannie Kever
jekever@uh.edu
713-743-0778
University of Houston

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
UT Austin leads $58 million effort to study potential new energy source
A research team led by The University of Texas at Austin has been awarded nearly $58 million to analyze deposits of frozen methane under the Gulf of Mexico that hold enormous potential to increase the world's energy supply.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Anton Caputo
anton.caputo@jsg.utexas.edu
512-232-9623
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Astrophysical Journal
POLARBEAR detects B-modes in the cosmic microwave background
The POLARBEAR experiment has made the most sensitive and precise measurements yet of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background and found telling twists called B-modes in the patterns, signs that this cosmic backlight has been warped by intervening structures in the universe.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Susan Brown
sdbrown@ucsd.edu
858-246-0161
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
Facetless crystals that mimic starfish shells could advance 3-D-printing pills
In a design that mimics a hard-to-duplicate texture of starfish shells, University of Michigan engineers have made rounded crystals that have no facets.
US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, National Science Foundation, Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: Nicole Casal Moore
ncmoore@umich.edu
734-647-7087
University of Michigan

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Nature Materials
Goldilocks principle wrong for particle assembly: Too hot and too cold is just right
Microscopic particles that bind under low temperatures will melt as temperatures rise to moderate levels, but re-connect under hotter conditions, a team of NYU scientists has found. Their discovery points to new ways to create 'smart materials,' cutting-edge materials that adapt to their environment by taking new forms, and to sharpen the detail of 3-D printing.
National Science Foundation, NASA, US Department of Energy

Contact: James Devitt
james.devitt@nyu.edu
212-998-6808
New York University

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Acta Crystallographica Section A
Towards controlled dislocations
Klie and co-workers have used atomic-resolution Z-contrast imaging and X-ray spectroscopy in a scanning transmission electron microscope to explore dislocations in the binary II-VI semiconductor CdTe, commercially used in thin-film photovoltaics. The results may lead to eventual improvement in the conversion efficiency of CdTe solar cells. These novel insights into atomically resolved chemical structure of dislocations have potential for understanding many more defect-based phenomena.
US Department of Energy Sunshot Program

Contact: Jonathan Agbenyega
ja@iucr.org
44-124-434-2878
International Union of Crystallography

Public Release: 19-Oct-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
Imaging electric charge propagating along microbial nanowires
UMass Amherst physicists working with Derek Lovley and colleagues report in the current issue of Nature Nanotechnology that they've used a new imaging technique, electrostatic force microscopy, to resolve the biological debate with evidence from physics, showing that electric charges do indeed propagate along microbial nanowires just as they do in carbon nanotubes, a highly conductive man-made material.
Office of Naval Research, US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
ACS Catalysis
New catalyst could improve biofuels production
Washington State University researchers have developed a new catalyst that could lead to making biofuels cheaply and more efficiently. Led by Voiland Distinguished Professor Yong Wang, the researchers mixed inexpensive iron with a tiny amount of rare palladium to make the catalyst.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Yoon Wang
wang42@wsu.edu
509-371-6273
Washington State University

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Nature
Researchers develop world's thinnest electric generator
Researchers from Columbia Engineering and the Georgia Institute of Technology report today that they have made the first experimental observation of piezoelectricity and the piezotronic effect in an atomically thin material, molybdenum disulfide, MoS2, resulting in a unique electric generator and mechanosensation devices that are optically transparent, extremely light, and very bendable and stretchable.
US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, National Science Foundation

Contact: Holly Evarts
holly.evarts@columbia.edu
212-854-3206
Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science

Public Release: 13-Oct-2014
Major grant to fund research into advanced, economically viable bioproducts
Researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, University of Minnesota and Argonne National Laboratory will explore ways to produce renewable plastic precursors and other substances from biomass with a recently announced $3.3 million grant from the United States Department of Energy.
US Department of Energy

Contact: George Huber
huber@engr.wisc.edu
608-263-0346
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 9-Oct-2014
Journal of Biological Chemistry
Researchers unfold new details about a powerful protein
Using X-rays and neutron beams, a team of researchers from the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, University of Utah and Oak Ridge National Laboratory have teased out new information about Protein Kinase A, or PKA, a ubiquitous master switch that helps regulate fundamental cellular functions like energy consumption and interactions with hormones, neurotransmitters and drugs.
US Department of Energy, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 9-Oct-2014
Journal of Biological Chemistry
Advanced X-ray, neutron beam imaging reveal workings of powerful biochemical switch PKA
A University of Utah-led study using X-rays and neutron beams has revealed the inner workings of a master switch that regulates basic cellular functions, but that also, when mutated, contributes to cancer, cardiovascular disease and other deadly disorders.
US Department of Energy, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Phil Sahm
phil.sahm@hsc.utah.edu
801-581-2517
University of Utah Health Sciences

Public Release: 9-Oct-2014
Nature
Unstoppable magnetoresistance
Researchers at Princeton University have discovered a material (WTe2) with an extremely large magnetoresistance, which is the change in resistance as a material is exposed to stronger magnetic fields. The researchers exposed WTe2 to a 60-tesla magnetic field, close to the strongest magnetic field mankind can create, and observed a magnetoresistance of 13 million percent. The material's magnetoresistance displayed unlimited growth, making it the only known material without a saturation point.
US Army Research Office, National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Tien Nguyen
tienn@princeton.edu
609-258-6523
Princeton University

Public Release: 9-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
A cost-effective and energy-efficient approach to carbon capture
Scientists from EPFL, UC Berkley and Beijing have developed a slurry-based process that can revolutionize carbon capture. The slurry, consisting of a porous powder suspended in glycol, offers the efficient large-scale implementation of a liquid while maintaining the lower costs and energy efficiency of solid carbon-capturing materials.
National Natural Science Foundation of China, National 973 Project of China, Center for Gas Separations Relevant to Clean Energy Technologies, Program for New Century Excellent Talents from Ministry of Education, US Department of Energy

Contact: Nik Papageorgiou
n.papageorgiou@epfl.ch
41-216-932-105
Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

Public Release: 3-Oct-2014
Technology
Continuous fabrication system for highly aligned polymer films provides method for tuning mechanical and thermal properties in bulk polymers
Novel and scalable continuous fabrication process combining Couette flow extrusion and macroscopic plastic deformation results in ability to increase mechanical, thermal, and crystalline properties in bulk polymer films.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Philly Lim
mllim@wspc.com
656-466-5775
World Scientific

Public Release: 3-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
Batteries included: A solar cell that stores its own power
Is it a solar cell? Or a rechargeable battery? Actually, the patent-pending device invented at the Ohio State University is both: the world's first solar battery. In the Oct. 3, 2014, issue of the journal Nature Communications, the researchers report that they've succeeded in combining a battery and a solar cell into one hybrid device.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Pam Frost Gorder
gorder.1@osu.edu
614-292-9475
Ohio State University

Public Release: 2-Oct-2014
Science
Making oxygen before life
About one-fifth of the Earth's atmosphere is oxygen, pumped out by green plants as a result of photosynthesis and used by most living things on the planet to keep our metabolisms running. UC Davis scientists have now shown that oxygen can be formed directly from carbon dioxide in the upper atmosphere, changing models of how the atmosphere evolved early in Earth's history.
NASA, National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Andy Fell
ahfell@ucdavis.edu
530-752-4533
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 2-Oct-2014
Science
New approach to boosting biofuel production
MIT researchers find different environment helps yeast tolerate high levels of ethanol, making them more productive.
MIT Energy Initiative, US Department of Energy

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Researchers get $5.25 million to advance nuclear technologies in South Carolina
A team of environmental scientists and engineers, led by Clemson University associate professor Brian Powell, was awarded a three-year, $5.25 million grant from the US Department of Energy's Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research to make a direct positive impact on South Carolina in the advancement of monitoring, remediation and disposal of radioactive contaminants.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Brian Powell
bpowell@clemson.edu
864-656-1004
Clemson University

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Physics Review Letters
Deceptive-looking vortex line in superfluid led to twice-mistaken identity
So long, solitons: University of Chicago physicists have shown that a group of scientists were incorrect when they concluded that a mysterious effect found in superfluids indicated the presence of solitons -- exotic, solitary waves. Instead, they explain, the result was due to more pedestrian, whirlpool-like structures in the fluid. They published their explanation in the Sept. 19 issue of Physical Review Letters.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, Hertz Foundation

Contact: Steve Koppes
skoppes@uchicago.edu
773-702-8366
University of Chicago

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society A
Adding uncertainty to improve mathematical models
Mathematicians from Brown University have introduced a new element of uncertainty into an equation used to describe the behavior of fluid flows. While being as certain as possible is generally the stock and trade of mathematics, the researchers hope this new formulation might ultimately lead to mathematical models that better reflect the inherent uncertainties of the natural world.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research, US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Kevin Stacey
kevin_stacey@brown.edu
401-863-3766
Brown University

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Nitrogen fingerprint in biomolecules could be from early sun
The pattern of nitrogen in biomolecules like proteins, which differ greatly from that seen in other parts of the solar system, could have been generated by the interactions of light from the early sun with nitrogen gas in the nebula, long before Earth formed.
NASA, US Department of Energy

Contact: Susan Brown
sdbrown@ucsd.edu
858-246-0161
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 24-Sep-2014
Advanced Functional Materials
Nanotechnology leads to better, cheaper LEDs for phones and lighting
Using a new nanoscale structure, the researchers, led by electrical engineering professor Stephen Chou, increased the brightness and efficiency of LEDs made of organic materials -- flexible carbon-based sheets -- by 57 percent. The researchers also report their method should yield similar improvements in LEDs made in inorganic, silicon-based materials used most commonly today.
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Office of Naval Research, US Department of Energy

Contact: John Sullivan
js29@princeton.edu
609-258-4597
Princeton University, Engineering School

Showing releases 1-25 out of 188.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

 

 

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