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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

NEWS FROM UNIVERSITIES AND OTHER DOE RESEARCH PARTNERS

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 205.

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Public Release: 21-May-2015
OU professor named recipient of prestigious DOE Lawrence award
University of Oklahoma Professor Jizhong Zhou will receive the US Department of Energy's highest scientific award from US Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz in a ceremony in Washington, D.C., later this year. The prestigious 2014 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award acknowledges outstanding contributions in the biological and environmental sciences supporting research and development of the US Department of Energy and its mission to advance the national, economic and energy security of the United States.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Jana Smith
jana.smith@ou.edu
405-325-1322
University of Oklahoma

Public Release: 20-May-2015
Scientists tackle mystery of thunderstorms that strike at night
From June 1 through July 15, NCAR researchers and their colleagues from across North America will fan out each evening across the Great Plains to study the mysterious phenomenon of nighttime thunderstorms.
National Science Foundation, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, US Department of Energy

Contact: David Hosansky
hosansky@ucar.edu
303-497-8611
National Center for Atmospheric Research/University Corporation for Atmospheric Research

Public Release: 18-May-2015
Nature Climate Change
Exposure of US population to extreme heat could quadruple by mid-century
US residents' exposure to extreme heat could increase four- to six-fold by mid-century, due to both a warming climate and a population that's growing especially fast in the hottest regions of the country, according to new research by NCAR scientists.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: David Hosansky
hosansky@ucar.edu
303-497-8611
National Center for Atmospheric Research/University Corporation for Atmospheric Research

Public Release: 18-May-2015
Nature Chemical Biology
Discovery paves way for homebrewed drugs
A research team led by UC Berkeley bioengineers has completed key steps needed to turn sugar-fed yeast into a microbial factory for producing morphine and potentially other drugs, including antibiotics and anticancer agents. The process could soon become as straightforward as making homebrewed beer, prompting calls for urgent regulation.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, Genome Canada, Genome Quebec

Contact: Sarah Yang
scyang@berkeley.edu
510-643-7741
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 13-May-2015
Lehigh chemical engineer awarded DOE funding to design novel functional materials
Jeetain Mittal, assistant professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering at Lehigh University, is one of 44 scientists selected from across the nation to receive significant funding for research as part of the US Department of Energy's Early Career Research Program.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Jordan Reese
jor310@lehigh.edu
610-758-6656
Lehigh University

Public Release: 11-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
High-performance 3-D microbattery suitable for large-scale on-chip integration
By combining 3-D holographic lithography and 2-D photolithography, researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have demonstrated a high-performance 3-D microbattery suitable for large-scale on-chip integration with microelectronic devices.
US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering

Contact: Paul V. Braun
pbraun@illinois.edu
217-244-7293
University of Illinois College of Engineering

Public Release: 7-May-2015
Nano Letters
Plugging up leaky graphene
A new technique may enable faster, more durable water filters.
MIT/Center for Clean Water and Clean Energy, US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 7-May-2015
Cell Metabolism
Study finds metabolic link between bacterial 'biofilms' and colon cancer
A team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine has uncovered a big clue to how bacteria may promote some colon cancers.
California Institute of Regenerative Medicine, National Institutes of Health, US Department of Energy

Contact: Madeline McCurry-Schmidt
madms@scripps.edu
858-784-9254
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 6-May-2015
BMC Systems Biology
From the depths of a microscopic world, spontaneous cooperation
A clever combination of two different types of computer simulations enabled a group of Illinois researchers to uncover an unexpectedly cooperative group dynamic: the spontaneous emergence of resource sharing among individuals in a community. Who were the members of this friendly, digitally represented collective? Escherichia coli, rod-shaped bacteria found in the digestive systems of humans and many other animals.
US Department of Energy, National Institutes of Health, Edelheit Foundation, Center for the Physics of Living Cells, National Science Foundation

Contact: Nicholas Vasi
nvasi@illinois.edu
Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 30-Apr-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
Dull forest glow yields orbital tracking of photosynthesis
New research provides some crucial ground truth for a method of measuring plant photosynthesis on a global scale from orbit. The work shows that chlorophyll fluorescence, a faint glow produced by plant leaves as a byproduct of photosynthesis, is a strong proxy for photosynthetic activity in the canopy of a deciduous forest.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, Long Term Ecological Research Network

Contact: Kevin Stacey
kevin_stacey@brown.edu
401-863-3766
Brown University

Public Release: 30-Apr-2015
Science
Meet the beetle that packs a machine gun
An interdisciplinary collaboration including materials scientists, an imaging expert and an entomologist discovered how bombardier beetles manage to fire rapid bursts of a searing hot chemical mix at predators or other creatures that harass them.
US Department of Energy, MIT Institute of Soldier Nanotechnologies, MIT Center for Materials Science and Engineering, National Security Science and Engineering Faculty Fellowship, National Science Foundation

Contact: Daniel Stolte
stolte@email.arizona.edu
520-626-4402
University of Arizona

Public Release: 29-Apr-2015
Geophysical Research Letters
Can photosynthesis be measured over large areas? MBL, Brown U. scientists find a way
By mounting cameras and spectral sensors over a forest canopy in central Massachusetts, scientists have developed an innovative system to measure plant photosynthesis over large areas, such as acres of crops or trees, using information on solar-induced fluorescence in the leaves. The system, which can monitor plant growth and several other ecosystem changes, was developed by a team led by Marine Biological Laboratory and Brown University scientists. It is described in a recent paper in Geophysical Research Letters.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Diana Kenney
dkenney@mbl.edu
508-289-7139
Marine Biological Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Apr-2015
DIS 2015 XXIII International Workshop on Deep-Inelastic Scattering and Related Subjects
First proton collisions at world's largest science experiment should start in early June
First collisions of protons at the world's largest science experiment should start the first or second week of June, said CERN Large Hadron Collider senior research scientist Albert DeRoeck, speaking at the DIS 2015 international physics workshop, Southern Methodist University, Dallas. The LHC restarted is second run in early April. There are no significant signs of new physics yet, but DeRoeck said it will take only one significant deviation in the data to change everything.
SMU, US Department of Energy, CERN, National Science Foundation, Fermilab, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Jefferson Lab, DESY

Contact: Margaret Allen
mallen@smu.edu
214-768-7664
Southern Methodist University

Public Release: 27-Apr-2015
Improving geothermal energy
The University of Utah's Energy & Geoscience Institute is one of five research groups selected to study new techniques for developing geothermal energy in places where it's not currently feasible.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Vince Horiuchi
vincent.horiuchi@utah.edu
801-585-7499
University of Utah

Public Release: 27-Apr-2015
Nature Materials
More is less in novel electronic material
A team reports the first quantum evidence of system-shrinking negative electronic compressibility in a novel insulator.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, W. M. Keck Foundation

Contact: Ed Hayward
ed.hayward@bc.edu
617-552-4826
Boston College

Public Release: 21-Apr-2015
Physical Review Letters
New tabletop detector 'sees' single electrons
MIT physicists have developed a new tabletop particle detector that is able to identify single electrons in a radioactive gas.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 20-Apr-2015
Nature Communications
Iowa State, Ames Lab scientists describe protein pumps that allow bacteria to resist drugs
Research teams led by Edward Yu of Iowa State University and the Ames Laboratory have described the structure of two closely related protein pumps that allow bacteria to resist certain medications. The findings have just been published by Nature Communications and as the April 7 cover paper in Cell Reports.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Energy/Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Iowa State University

Contact: Edward Yu
ewyu@iastate.edu
515-294-4955
Iowa State University

Public Release: 17-Apr-2015
Advanced Materials
Beyond the lithium ion -- a significant step toward a better performing battery
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have taken a significant step toward the development of a battery that could outperform the lithium-ion technology used in electric cars such as the Chevy Volt. They have shown they can replace the lithium ions, each of which carries a single positive charge, with magnesium ions, which have a plus-two charge, in battery-like chemical reactions, using an electrode with a structure like those in many of today's devices.
Joint Center for Energy Storage Research, US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Jeanne Galatzer-Levy
jgala@uic.edu
312-996-1583
University of Illinois at Chicago

Public Release: 16-Apr-2015
Experimental Botany
Study finds that maize roots have evolved to be more nitrogen efficient
Selective breeding of maize over the last century to create hybrids with desirable shoot characteristics and increased yield may have contributed indirectly to the evolution of root systems that are more efficient in acquiring nutrients, such as nitrogen, from the soil, according to researchers.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 15-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Discovery of new plant switch could boost crops, biofuel production
A team of Michigan State University researchers has discovered a switch that regulates plant photosynthesis -- the process that lets plants store solar energy and use it to grow and produce food.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Layne Cameron
layne.cameron@cabs.msu.edu
517-353-8819
Michigan State University

Public Release: 8-Apr-2015
Proceedings 14th International Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multiagent Systems
California's solar incentive program has had only modest impact on adoption rates
According to a new analysis, California's aggressive incentive program for installing rooftop solar-electric systems has not been as effective as generally believed.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Salisbury
david.salisbury@vanderbilt.edu
615-343-6803
Vanderbilt University

Public Release: 7-Apr-2015
Nature Communications
Tunneling across a tiny gap
Researchers at MIT, the University of Oklahoma, and Rutgers University have developed a model that explains how heat flows between objects separated by gaps of less than a nanometer. The team has developed a unified framework that calculates heat transport at finite gaps, and has shown that heat flow at sub-nanometer distances occurs not via radiation or conduction, but through 'phonon tunneling.'
US Department of Energy

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 6-Apr-2015
Nature Climate Change
Climate change, plant roots may accelerate carbon loss from soils
Soil, long thought to be a semi-permanent storehouse for ancient carbon, may be releasing carbon dioxide to the atmosphere faster than anyone thought. In a study published in Nature Climate Change, researchers showed that chemicals emitted by plant roots act on carbon that is bonded to minerals in the soil, breaking the bonds and exposing previously protected carbon to decomposition by microbes.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Markus Kleber
markus.kleber@oregonstate.edu
541-737-5718
Oregon State University

Public Release: 6-Apr-2015
Nature
Aluminum battery from Stanford offers safe alternative to conventional batteries
Stanford University scientists have invented the first high-performance aluminum battery that's fast-charging, long-lasting and inexpensive. Researchers say the new technology could replace many lithium-ion and alkaline batteries in wide use today.
US Department of Energy, Taiwan Industrial Technology Research Institute, Stanford Global Climate and Energy Project, Stanford Precourt Institute for Energy, Taiwan Ministry of Education

Contact: Mark Shwartz
mshwartz@stanford.edu
650-723-9296
Stanford University

Public Release: 6-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Study of vehicle emissons will aid urban sustainability efforts
Boston University researchers have created DARTE (Database of Road Transportation Emissions), a new nationwide data inventory that can help to provide this crucial information.
NASA, National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Kira Jastive
kjastive@bu.edu
617-358-1240
Boston University

Showing releases 1-25 out of 205.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

 

 

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