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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

NEWS FROM UNIVERSITIES AND OTHER DOE RESEARCH PARTNERS

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 276.

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Public Release: 25-Aug-2016
UTA physicists to upgrade Titan supercomputer software for extreme scale applications
Physicists at The University of Texas at Arlington have been awarded a new $1.06 million grant from the U.S. Department of Energy to upgrade the software that runs on the Titan supercomputer at Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility in Tennessee to support extremely data-heavy scientific applications such as advanced biology and materials science simulations.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Louisa Kellie
louisa.kellie@uta.edu
817-524-8926
University of Texas at Arlington

Public Release: 25-Aug-2016
Nature Communications
New method developed for producing some metals
While trying to develop a new battery, MIT researchers find a whole new energy-efficient way to produce some metals without creating air pollution.
US Department of Energy, Advanced Research Projects-Energy, Total S.A., MIT Energy Initiative

Contact: Karl-Lydie Jean-Baptiste
kjeanbap@mit.edu
617-253-1682
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 24-Aug-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Green light: USU biochemists describe light-driven conversion of greenhouse gas to fuel
By way of a light-driven bacterium, Utah State University biochemists are a step closer to cleanly converting harmful carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel combustion into usable fuels. Using the phototropic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris as a biocatalyst, the scientists generated methane from carbon dioxide in one enzymatic step.
US Department of Energy, DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Lance Seefeldt
lance.seefeldt@usu.edu
435-797-3964
Utah State University

Public Release: 23-Aug-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Study reveals new physics of how fluids flow in porous media
Detailed lab experiments from MIT and Oxford University provide fresh insight into the physics of fluid-fluid displacement in porous media, crucial to applications like carbon dioxide sequestration or fuel cell operation.
US Department of Energy, MIT Energy Initiative

Contact: Ms. Karl-Lydie Jean-Baptiste
kjeanbap@mit.edu
617-253-1682
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 23-Aug-2016
Scientific Reports
New approach to determining how atoms are arranged in materials
Researchers have developed a novel approach to characterizing how atoms are arranged in materials, using Bayesian statistical methods to glean new insights into the structure of materials. The work should inform the development of new materials for use in a variety of applications.
National Science Foundation, DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 22-Aug-2016
Nature Physics
Light and matter merge in quantum coupling
Rice University physicists probe the boundaries of light-matter interactions as they bridge traditional condensed matter physics and cavity-based quantum optics.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, Lockheed Martin Corp. and W.M. Keck Foundation

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 22-Aug-2016
Nature Energy
Bubble-wrapped sponge creates steam using sunlight
How do you boil water? Eschewing the traditional kettle and flame, MIT engineers have invented a bubble-wrapped, sponge-like device that soaks up natural sunlight and heats water to boiling temperatures, generating steam through its pores. The design, which the researchers call a 'solar vapor generator,' requires no expensive mirrors or lenses to concentrate the sunlight, but instead relies on a combination of relatively low-tech materials to capture ambient sunlight and concentrate it as heat.
Masdar Institute of Science and Technology, Solid-State Solar Thermal Energy Conversion Center, US Department of Energy

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 18-Aug-2016
Structure
Study shows how mutations disrupt ALS-linked protein
Structural biologists provide a new explanation for how ALS-associated genetic flaws interfere with the proper function and behavior of the protein TDP-43.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Energy

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 16-Aug-2016
Soybean science blooms with supercomputers
Soybean Knowledge Base (SoyKB) project finds and shares comprehensive genetic and genomic soybean data through support of NSF-sponsored XSEDE high performance computing. SoyKB helps scientists improve soybean traits. XSEDE Stampede supercomputer 370,000 core hour allocation used in resequencing of over 1,000 soybean germplasm lines. XSEDE ECSS established Pegasus workflow that optimized SoyKB for supercomputers. SoyKB migrated workflow to XSEDE Wrangler data intensive supercomputer. Scientific cloud environment Jetstream of XSEDE broadened user base.
National Science Foundation, Missouri Soybean Merchandising Council, United Soybean Board, US Department of Energy

Contact: Jorge Salazar
jorge@tacc.utexas.edu
512-471-3980
University of Texas at Austin, Texas Advanced Computing Center

Public Release: 15-Aug-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
New enzyme-mapping advance could help drug development
Scientists at MIT and the University of São Paulo in Brazil have identified the structure of an enzyme that could be a good target for drugs combatting three diseases common in the developing world.
São Paulo Research Foundation, National Institutes of Health, US Department of Energy

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 12-Aug-2016
Energy & Environmental Science
Let's roll: Material for polymer solar cells may lend itself to large-area processing
An international team's findings provide important clues for designing polymer solar cells approaching target for power conversion efficiency and optimized for roll-to-roll processing.
National Institute of Standards and Technology, US Department of Energy

Contact: Mark Bello
mark.bello@nist.gov
301-975-3776
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

Public Release: 11-Aug-2016
Chem
Self-shading windows switch from clear to opaque
New MIT-developed electrochromic material could lead to self-shading glass windows that save energy by reducing the need for air-conditioning.
The Masdar Institute, US Department of Energy, Center for Excitonics

Contact: Karl-Lydie Jean-Baptiste
kjeanbap@mit.edu
617-253-1682
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 10-Aug-2016
Scientific Reports
Climate change already accelerating sea level rise, study finds
Greenhouse gases are already having an accelerating effect on sea level rise, but the impact has so far been masked by the cataclysmic 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines, according to a new study led by NCAR.
NASA, US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Laura Snider
lsnider@ucar.edu
303-497-8605
National Center for Atmospheric Research/University Corporation for Atmospheric Research

Public Release: 8-Aug-2016
Using nanotechnology to give fuel cells more oomph
Researchers from Vanderbilt University, Nissan North America and Georgia Institute of Technology have teamed up to apply nanotechnology to fuel cells to give them more oomph.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David F. Salisbury
david.salisbury@vanderbilt.edu
615-343-6803
Vanderbilt University

Public Release: 8-Aug-2016
Nanotechnology
Watch a tiny space rocket work
Moving a nanosatellite around in space takes only a tiny amount of thrust. Engineers from Michigan Technological University and the University of Maryland teamed up, put a nanoscale rocket under a microscope, and watched what happened.
NASA, National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, Michigan/Air Force Center of Excellence in Electric Propulsion

Contact: Allison Mills
awmills@mtu.edu
906-487-2343
Michigan Technological University

Public Release: 8-Aug-2016
Nature Photonics
Making a solar energy conversion breakthrough with help from a ferroelectrics pioneer
Researchers from Philadelphia revealed a class of materials that could be better at converting sunlight into energy than those currently used in solar arrays. Their findings, which show how a ferroelectric insulator can extract power from a portion of the sunlight spectrum with conversion efficiency above its theoretical maximum (Shockley-Queisser limit), were aided by Russian physicist Vladimir M. Fridkin, a visiting professor at Drexel University, who is also one of the innovators behind the photocopier.
US Army Research Office, Office of Naval Research, US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Britt Faulstick
bef29@drexel.edu
215-895-2617
Drexel University

Public Release: 4-Aug-2016
Nature Communications
UWM researchers' work in catalysis could aid drug development
Products like pharmaceuticals have to be synthesized to have molecules of only one 'handedness' to match the structure of biomolecules in human proteins. Catalysts currently used to accomplish this are problematic. New research from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee is helping to bring the goal of a solid 'chiral' catalyst that can easily be separated from its products closer to reality.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Wilfred Tysoe
wtt@uwm.edu
414-229-5222
University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee

Public Release: 3-Aug-2016
Nature
Global warming, a dead zone and surprising bacteria
Climate change is expanding oxygen minimum zones -- virtual dead zones -- thus drawing the ire of scientists. Surprisingly, researchers have discovered SAR11 bacteria strains in the world's largest OMZ depleting nitrogen, which impacts global gas and nutrient cycles. The find upends previous strong doubts about the SAR11 clade's ability to adapt to such harsh conditions.
National Science Foundation, NASA Exobiology Program, Sloan Foundation, US Department of Energy, European Research Council, Danish National Research Foundation, Onassis Foundation Fellowship

Contact: Ben Brumfield
ben.brumfield@comm.gatech.edu
404-660-1408
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 3-Aug-2016
Geophysical Research Letters
Early snowmelt reduces forests' atmospheric CO2 uptake, decreases streamflow volume
Earlier, slower snowmelt hinders a subalpine forest's ability to regulate atmospheric carbon dioxide and reduces streamflow, a phenomenon with potentially drastic consequences for agriculture, municipal water supplies and recreational opportunities in Colorado and the western US.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, US Department of Agriculture, Niwot Ridge Long-Term Ecological Research Program, NASA

Contact: Noah Molotch
noah.molotch@colorado.edu
303-492-6151
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 1-Aug-2016
Cell Reports
Big trash pickup
Autophagy (self eating) has long been considered a kind of indiscriminate Pac-man like process of waste disposal. Now scientists at Washington University have shown that apart from conditions of cell starvation, it is carefully regulated: both in plants and yeast and most likely in people. The finding is relevant to aggregation-prone pathologies, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.
US Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Science, Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences Division

Contact: Diana Lutz
dlutz@wustl.edu
314-935-5272
Washington University in St. Louis

Public Release: 28-Jul-2016
Science
Vortex laser offers hope for Moore's Law
Like a whirlpool, a new light-based communication tool carries data in a swift, circular motion. Described in a study published July 28, 2016, by the journal Science, the optics advancement could become a central component of next generation computers designed to handle society's growing demand for information sharing. It may also be a salve to those fretting over the predicted end of Moore's Law.
US Army Research Office, US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Cory Nealon
cmnealon@buffalo.edu
716-645-4614
University at Buffalo

Public Release: 28-Jul-2016
Nature Communications
Keep a lid on it: Utah State University geologists probe geological carbon storage
An international collaboration of scientists' research in an area of southeastern Utah, USA, reveals insights about the feasibility of storing carbon.
Royal Dutch Shell, US Department of Energy

Contact: James "Jim" Evans
james.evans@usu.edu
435-797-1267
Utah State University

Public Release: 28-Jul-2016
Nature Communications
New material could advance superconductivity
Scientists have looked for different ways to force hydrogen into a metallic state for decades. Metallic hydrogen is a holy grail for materials science because it could be used for superconductors, materials that have no resistance to the flow of electrons, increasing efficiency many times over. For the first time researchers, led by Carnegie's Viktor Struzhkin, have experimentally produced a new class of materials blending hydrogen with sodium that could alter the superconductivity landscape.
US Department of Energy, Energy Frontier Research in Extreme Environments Center, Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, DARPA, NSFC

Contact: Viktor Struzhkin
vstruzhkin@carnegiescience.edu
Carnegie Institution for Science

Public Release: 28-Jul-2016
Science
Breakthrough solar cell captures CO2 and sunlight, produces burnable fuel
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have engineered a potentially game-changing solar cell that cheaply and efficiently converts atmospheric carbon dioxide directly into usable hydrocarbon fuel, using only sunlight for energy.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Bill Burton
burton@uic.edu
312-996-2269
University of Illinois at Chicago

Public Release: 25-Jul-2016
Physical Review Letters
WSU researchers 'watch' crystal structure change in real time
Washington State University researchers have met the long-standing scientific challenge of watching a material change its crystal structure in real time.
US Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration

Contact: Stefan Turneaure
stefant@wsu.edu
509-335-1834
Washington State University

Showing releases 1-25 out of 276.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

 

 

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