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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

NEWS FROM UNIVERSITIES AND OTHER DOE RESEARCH PARTNERS

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 212.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Public Release: 1-Jul-2015
Nature Communications
Effective conversion of methane by a new copper zeolite
A new bio-inspired zeolite catalyst, developed by an international team with researchers from Technische Universität München, Eindhoven University of Technology and University of Amsterdam, might pave the way to small scale 'gas-to-liquid' technologies converting natural gas to fuels and starting materials for the chemical industry. Investigating the mechanism of the selective oxidation of methane to methanol they identified a trinuclear copper-oxo-cluster as the active center inside the zeolite micropores.
US Department of Energy, EU NEXT-GTL

Contact: Dr. Andreas Battenberg
battenberg@zv.tum.de
49-892-891-0510
Technical University of Munich (TUM)

Public Release: 30-Jun-2015
Physical Review D
New model of cosmic stickiness favors 'Big Rip' demise of universe
Vanderbilt University mathematician Marcelo Disconzi, working with physicists Robert Scherrer and Tom Kephart, has come up with a new approach to calculate cosmic viscosity and the formulation favors the 'Big Rip' scenario for the end of the universe.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: David Salisbury
david.salisbury@vanderbilt.edu
615-343-6803
Vanderbilt University

Public Release: 30-Jun-2015
Advanced Science
Carnegie Mellon chemists characterize 3-D macroporous hydrogels
Carnegie Mellon University chemists have developed two novel methods to characterize 3-D macroporous hydrogels -- materials that hold great promise for developing 'smart' responsive materials that can be used for catalysts, chemical detectors, tissue engineering scaffolds and absorbents for carbon capture.
US Department of Energy's Office of Science

Contact: Jocelyn Duffy
jhduffy@andrew.cmu.edu
412-268-2900
Carnegie Mellon University

Public Release: 25-Jun-2015
Acta Crystallographica Section D
The silent partner in macromolecular crystals
On average, the mother liquor or solvent and its constituents occupy about 50 percent of a macromolecular crystal. Ordered as well as disordered solvent components need to be accurately accounted for in modelling and refinement, often with considerable complexity.
Marie Curie People Action Grant, National Institutes of Health, Phoenix Industrial Consortium, US Department of Energy

Contact: Dr. Jonathan Agbenyega
ja@iucr.org
44-124-434-2878
International Union of Crystallography

Public Release: 24-Jun-2015
University of Illinois awarded $3.1 million to develop all-terrain rovers for high-throughput field phenotyping
The University of Illinois announced that is has been awarded a two-year, $3.1 million grant from the DOE Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy. The U. of I. will be the lead institution on the Mobile Energy-crop Phenotyping Platform, working in partnership with researchers from Cornell University and Signetron Inc.
US Department of Energy Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy

Contact: Haley Ahlers
ahlers@illinois.edu
217-265-5447
Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 22-Jun-2015
Journal of Biological Chemistry
Researchers successfully target 'Achilles' heel' of MERS virus
Researchers studying the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, have found molecules that shut down the activity of an essential enzyme in the virus and could lead the way to better treatments for those infected. The team identified molecules that inhibit an enzyme essential to MERS virus replication, and also discovered a characteristic of the enzyme that is very different from other coronaviruses.
National Institutes of Health, Walther Cancer Foundation, US Department of Energy, Purdue Center for Cancer Research, Michigan Economic Development Corporation and Michigan Technology TriCorridor, Eli Lilly Company

Contact: Elizabeth K. Gardner
ekgardner@purdue.edu
765-494-2081
Purdue University

Public Release: 22-Jun-2015
Nature Materials
The secrets of secretion
Living tissues rely on their ability to package, transport and secrete liquid, where and when it's needed. Nature's secretion system is responsive, self-regulatory and intrinsically linked with its surroundings. Synthetic systems haven't been able to replicate that complexity -- until now. A new system developed at Harvard spontaneously releases only enough fluid to replace what is lost on the surface.
US Department of Energy's Basic Energy Sciences Office, Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy

Contact: Leah Burrows
lburrows@seas.harvard.edu
617-496-1351
Harvard University

Public Release: 22-Jun-2015
Applied Physics Letters
Discovery paves way for new kinds of superconducting electronics
Physicists at UC San Diego have developed a new way to control the transport of electrical currents through high-temperature superconductors -- materials discovered nearly 30 years ago that lose all resistance to electricity at commercially attainable low temperatures.
US Department of Energy, Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: Kim McDonald
kmcdonald@ucsd.edu
858-534-7572
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 18-Jun-2015
Angewandte Chemie
Penn research simplifies recycling of rare-earth magnets
Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have now pioneered a process that could enable the efficient recycling of two rare-earth metals, neodymium and dysprosium. These elements comprise the small, powerful magnets that are found in many high-tech devices. In contrast to the massive and energy-intensive industrial process currently used to separate rare earths, the Penn team's method works nearly instantaneously at room temperature and uses standard laboratory equipment.
US Department of Energy's Office of Science, Research Corporation for Science Advancement

Contact: Evan Lerner
elerner@upenn.edu
215-573-6604
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 18-Jun-2015
Science
X-ray imaging reveals secrets in battery materials
In a new study, researchers explain why one particular cathode material works well at high voltages, while most other cathodes do not. The insights, published in the June 19 issue of the journal Science, could help battery developers design rechargeable lithium-ion batteries that operate at higher voltages.
US Department of Energy Office of Basic Energy Sciences, US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Liezel Labios
llabios@ucsd.edu
858-246-1124
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 17-Jun-2015
Nature Communications
A new way to image surfaces on the nanoscale
A multi-institutional team of scientists, including a Northwestern University professor of materials science and engineering, has taken an important step in understanding where atoms are located on the surfaces of rough materials, information that could be very useful in diverse commercial applications, such as developing green energy and understanding how materials rust. The team has developed a new imaging technique that uses atomic resolution secondary electron images in a quantitative way to determine the arrangement of atoms on the surface.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, Basic Energy Science, Material Science and Engineering Division

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 16-Jun-2015
Advanced Materials
Designer electronics out of the printer
They are thin, lightweight, flexible and can be produced cost- and energy-efficiently: printed microelectronic components made of synthetics. Flexible displays and touch screens, glowing films, RFID tags and solar cells represent a future market. In the context of an international cooperation project, physicists at the Technische Universität München have now observed the creation of razor thin polymer electrodes during the printing process and successfully improved the electrical properties of the printed films.
EuroTech Universities, International Graduate School of Science and Engineering, German Research Foundation, Elite Network of Bavaria, Center for NanoScience, US Department of Energy

Contact: Dr. Andreas Battenberg
battenberg@zv.tum.de
49-892-891-0510
Technical University of Munich (TUM)

Public Release: 16-Jun-2015
Nature Communications
Renewable energy from evaporating water
Columbia University scientists report the development of two novel devices that derive power directly from evaporation -- a floating, piston-driven engine that generates electricity causing a light to flash, and a rotary engine that drives a miniature car.
US Department of Energy, Office of Science, David and Lucile Packard Fellows Program

Contact: Ozgur Sahin
os2246@columbia.edu
212-851-9285
Columbia University

Public Release: 16-Jun-2015
Nature Communications
Hematite 're-growth' smoothes rough edges for clean energy harvest
By smoothing the surface of hematite, a team of researchers led by Boston College chemist Dunwei Wang achieved the first 'unassisted' water splitting using the abundant rust-like mineral and silicon to capture and store solar energy within hydrogen gas.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Ed Hayward
ed.hayward@bc.edu
617-552-4826
Boston College

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
PLOS ONE
Bacteria could help clean groundwater contaminated by uranium ore processing
A strain of bacteria that 'breathes' uranium may hold the key to cleaning up polluted groundwater at sites where uranium ore was processed to make nuclear weapons. A team of scientists discovered the bacteria in soil at an old uranium ore mill in Rifle, Colorado. The research is part of a US Department of Energy program to see if microorganisms can lock up uranium that leached into the soil years ago.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Carl Blesch
cblesch@ucm.rutgers.edu
848-932-0550
Rutgers University

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
Nature Materials
Scientists are first to see elements transform at atomic scale
Chemists have witnessed atoms of one chemical element morph into another element for the first time ever. The isotope they studied -- iodine-125 -- is commonly used to treat cancer and this breakthrough unexpectedly revealed a possible new way to irradiate tumors more effectively.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, European Research Council, Royal Society

Contact: Kim Thurler
kim.thurler@tufts.edu
617-627-3175
Tufts University

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
Nature
Newfound groups of bacteria are mixing up the tree of life
Bacteria, one of the three major branches of the tree of life, are a fuzzy bit of foliage. While scientists know there are many unidentified species, they have not been classified or characterized because no one can culture them. Now a UC Berkeley team led by Jill Banfield has sequenced a community of bacteria, assembled almost 800 nearly complete genomes and found that many of them represent completely new phyla: more than 35 in all.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Robert Sanders
rlsanders@berkeley.edu
510-643-6998
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 8-Jun-2015
Wayne State professor receives prestigious DOE early career grant
The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science recently announced its selection of 50 scientists from across the nation to receive its Early Career Research Program award. Eranda Nikolla, Ph.D., assistant professor of chemical engineering in Wayne State University's College of Engineering, was selected out of 620 submissions to receive a five-year, $750,000 award for her proposal, Nanostructured, targeted layered metal oxides as active and selective heterogeneous electrocatalysts for oxygen evolution.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Julie O'Connor
julie.oconnor@wayne.edu
313-577-8845
Wayne State University - Office of the Vice President for Research

Public Release: 8-Jun-2015
Journal of the American Chemical Society
Nanomaterial self-assembly imaged in real time
A team of researchers from UC San Diego, Florida State University and Pacific Northwest National Laboratories has for the first time visualized the growth of 'nanoscale' chemical complexes in real time, demonstrating that processes in liquids at the scale of one-billionth of a meter can be documented as they happen.
US Department of Energy, US Department of Defense, National Science Foundation

Contact: Kim McDonald
kmcdonald@ucsd.edu
858-534-7572
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 3-Jun-2015
Journal of Nanophotonics
World's smallest spirals could guard against identity theft
Vanderbilt researchers have made the world's smallest spirals and found they have unique optical properties that are nearly impossible to counterfeit if they were added to identity cards, currency and other objects.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: David Salisbury
david.salisbury@vanderbilt.edu
615-343-6803
Vanderbilt University

Public Release: 2-Jun-2015
Journal of Cleaner Production
Saving money and the environment with 3-D printing
A Northwestern-Argonne team examined the environmental effects of 3-D printing metal aircraft parts and found the method could reduce an airplane's weight by 4 to 7 percent.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 2-Jun-2015
UW researchers scaling up fusion hopes with DOE grant
University of Washington researchers are scaling up a novel plasma confinement device with a new US Department of Energy grant, in hopes of producing a self-sustaining reaction to create fusion energy.
US Department of Energy Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy

Contact: Jennifer Langston
jlangst@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 2-Jun-2015
Plant Journal
Move over Arabidopsis, there's a new model plant in town
Biological nitrogen fixation provides a free way for plants to alter and absorb the nutrient. Legumes like soybeans fix nitrogen due to the symbiosis with bacteria in the soil through development of nodules on their roots, but since grasses like corn and rice don't form this specialized structures that relationship has been trickier to explore. Researchers have now shown the grass Setaria viridis received 100 percent of its nitrogen from the bacteria Azospirillum brasilense.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Roger Meissen
meissenr@missouri.edu
573-884-7443
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 1-Jun-2015
Nature Nanotechnology
A new tool measures the distance between phonon collisions
A tabletop setup provides more nuanced picture of heat production in microelectronics.
MIT's Solid-State Solar Thermal Energy Conversion Center, US Department of Energy

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 25-May-2015
Nature Nanotechnology
One step closer to a single-molecule device
Columbia Engineering professor Latha Venkataraman has designed a new technique to create a single-molecule diode, and, in doing so, she has developed molecular diodes that perform 50 times better than all prior designs. Venkataraman's group is the first to develop a single-molecule diode that may have real-world technological applications for nanoscale devices.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, Packard Foundation

Contact: Holly Evarts
holly.evarts@columbia.edu
347-453-7408
Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science

Showing releases 1-25 out of 212.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

 

 

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