U.S.Department of Energy Research News
Text-Only | Privacy Policy | Site Map  
Search Releases and Features  
Biological SciencesComputational SciencesEnergy SciencesEnvironmental SciencesPhysical SciencesEngineering and TechnologyNational Security Science

Home
Labs
Multimedia Resources
News Releases
Feature Stories
Library
Contacts
RSS Feed



US Department of Energy National Science Bowl


Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

NEWS FROM UNIVERSITIES AND OTHER DOE RESEARCH PARTNERS

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 190.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Public Release: 18-Dec-2014
Nature Communications
Oregon researchers glimpse pathway of sunlight to electricity
Four pulses of laser light on nanoparticle photocells in a University of Oregon spectroscopy experiment has opened a window on how captured sunlight can be converted into electricity.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Jim Barlow
jebarlow@uoregon.edu
541-346-3481
University of Oregon

Public Release: 18-Dec-2014
Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters
Computational clues into the structure of a promising energy conversion catalyst
Researchers at Princeton University have reported new insights into the structure of an active component of the nickel oxide catalyst, a promising catalyst for water splitting to produce hydrogen fuel.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Tien Nguyen
tienn@princeton.edu
609-258-6523
Princeton University

Public Release: 18-Dec-2014
Journal of Physical Chemistry C
Rice study fuels hope for natural gas cars
Rice University researchers calculate the best candidates among possible metal organic frameworks to store natural gas for cars.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Mike Williams
mikewilliams@rice.edu
713-348-6728
Rice University

Public Release: 16-Dec-2014
Accounts of Chemical Research
The simplest element: Turning hydrogen into 'graphene'
New work from Carnegie's Ivan Naumov and Russell Hemley delves into the chemistry underlying some surprising recent observations about hydrogen, and reveals remarkable parallels between hydrogen and graphene under extreme pressures.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Russell Hemley
rhemley@carnegiescience.edu
Carnegie Institution

Public Release: 10-Dec-2014
Chemical Research in Toxicology
New technology tracks carcinogens as they move through the body
Researchers for the first time have developed a method to track through the human body the movement of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as extraordinarily tiny amounts of these potential carcinogens are biologically processed and eliminated.
Public Health Service, US Department of Energy, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: David Williams
david.williams@oregonstate.edu
541-737-3277
Oregon State University

Public Release: 10-Dec-2014
Physical Review Letters
Physicists explain puzzling particle collisions
An anomaly spotted at the Large Hadron Collider has prompted scientists to reconsider a mathematical description of the underlying physics. By considering two forces that are distinct in everyday life but unified under extreme conditions, they have simplified one description of the interactions of elementary particles. Their new version makes specific predictions about events that future experiments should observe and could help to reveal 'new physics,' particles or processes that have yet to be discovered.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Susan Brown
scinews@ucsd.edu
858-246-0161
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 10-Dec-2014
Nature Chemical Biology
CWRU scientists find key to vitamin A metabolism
Researchers have discovered the mechanism that enables the enzyme Lecithin: retinol acyltransferase to store vitamin A, which is essential for sight. The researchers hope the new information will be used to design small molecule therapies for degenerative eye diseases. The same enzymatic activity of LRAT that allows specific cells to absorb vitamin A can be used to transport small molecule drugs to the eye.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Energy

Contact: Kevin Mayhood
kevin.mayhood@case.edu
216-534-7183
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 10-Dec-2014
Nature
Proteins stepping on 'landmines': How they survive the immense heat they create
Research from Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis and the University of California Berkeley published online on Dec. 10 in Nature reports on how some proteins survive extreme heat generated when they catalyze reactions.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Cindy Fox Aisen
caisen@iupui.edu
317-843-2276
Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis School of Science

Public Release: 9-Dec-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
Warmer Pacific Ocean could release millions of tons of seafloor methane
Water off Washington's coast is warming a third of a mile down, where seafloor methane shifts from a frozen solid to a gas. Calculations suggest ocean warming is already releasing significant methane offshore of Alaska to Northern California.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 9-Dec-2014
Geophysical Review Letters
Temperature anomalies are warming faster than Earth's average
It's widely known that the Earth's average temperature has been rising. But research by an Indiana University geographer and colleagues finds that spatial patterns of extreme temperature anomalies -- readings well above or below the mean -- are warming even faster than the overall average.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Steve Hinnefeld
slhinnef@iu.edu
812-856-3488
Indiana University

Public Release: 5-Dec-2014
Science
45-year physics mystery shows a path to quantum transistors
An odd, iridescent material that's puzzled physicists for decades turns out to be an exotic state of matter that could open a new path to quantum computers and other next-generation electronics.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Nicole Casal Moore
ncmoore@umich.edu
734-647-7087
University of Michigan

Public Release: 5-Dec-2014
Nature
Looking at El Niño's past to predict its future
Scientists see a large amount of variability in the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) when looking back at climate records from thousands of years ago. Without a clear understanding of what caused past changes in ENSO variability, predicting the climate phenomenon's future is a difficult task. A new study shows how this climate system responds to various pressures, such as changes in carbon dioxide and ice cover, in one of the best models used to project future climate change.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Brett Israel
brett.israel@comm.gatech.edu
404-385-1933
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 4-Dec-2014
Science
Greenhouse gases linked to African rainfall
Scientists may have solved a long-standing enigma known as the African Humid Period -- an intense increase in cumulative rainfall in parts of Africa that began after a long dry spell following the end of the last ice age and lasting nearly 10,000 years. It has been linked to greenhouse gas concentrations.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Peter Clark
clarkp@geo.oregonstate.edu
541-737-1247
Oregon State University

Public Release: 2-Dec-2014
Nature Communications
Chemists fabricate novel rewritable paper
UC Riverside chemists have fabricated novel rewritable paper, one that is based on the color switching property of commercial chemicals called redox dyes. The dye forms the imaging layer of the paper. Printing is achieved by using ultraviolet light to photobleach the dye, except the portions that constitute the text on the paper. The new rewritable paper can be erased and written on more than 20 times with no significant loss in contrast and resolution.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 1-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Most of Earth's carbon may be hidden in the planet's inner core, new model suggests
As much as two-thirds of Earth's carbon may be hidden in the inner core, making it the planet's largest carbon reservoir, according to a new model that even its backers acknowledge is 'provocative and speculative'.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, Crosby Award from the U-M ADVANCE program, U-M's Associate Professor Support Fund

Contact: Jim Erickson
ericksn@umich.edu
734-647-1842
University of Michigan

Public Release: 27-Nov-2014
Acta Crystallographica Section D
Unraveling the complexity of proteins
Knowledge of the three-dimensional structures of proteins is essential for understanding biological processes.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Energy, Office of Biological and Environmental Research

Contact: Dr. Jonathan Agbenyega
ja@iucr.org
44-124-434-2878
International Union of Crystallography

Public Release: 27-Nov-2014
Science
Single-atom gold catalysts may offer path to low-cost production of fuel and chemicals
New catalysts designed and investigated by Tufts engineering researchers and collaborators have potential to greatly reduce processing costs in future fuels like hydrogen. The catalysts are composed of a unique structure of single gold atoms bound by oxygen to sodium or potassium atoms, supported on non-reactive silica materials. They demonstrate comparable activity and stability with catalysts comprising precious metal nanoparticles on rare earth and other reducible oxide supports when used in producing highly purified hydrogen.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Kim Thurler
kim.thurler@tufts.edu
617-627-3175
Tufts University

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Nature
Shaping the future of energy storage with conductive clay
Materials scientists from Drexel University's College of Engineering invented the clay, which is both highly conductive and can easily be molded into a variety of shapes and sizes. It represents a turn away from the rather complicated and costly processing -- currently used to make materials for lithium-ion batteries and supercapacitors -- and toward one that looks a bit like rolling out cookie dough with results that are even sweeter from an energy storage standpoint.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Britt Faulstick
bef29@drexel.edu
215-895-2617
Drexel University

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Nature Photonics
Ultra-short X-ray pulses explore the nano world
Ultra-short and extremely strong X-ray flashes, as produced by free-electron lasers, are opening the door to a hitherto unknown world. Scientists are using these flashes to take 'snapshots' of the geometry of tiniest structures, for example the arrangement of atoms in molecules. To improve not only spatial but also temporal resolution further requires knowledge about the precise duration and intensity of the X-ray flashes. An international team of scientists has now tackled this challenge.
German Research Foundation, Bavaria California Technology Center International, Max Planck Research Schools, US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, Science Foundation Ireland, European Union

Contact: Andreas Battenberg
battenberg@zv.tum.de
49-892-891-0510
Technische Universitaet Muenchen

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Researchers get $1.25 million to advance carbon storage
Clemson University researchers and their partners at Georgia Institute of Technology, UNAVCO and Grand Resources Inc. received a $1.25 million award from the Department of Energy to develop technology that will significantly improve the ability to monitor and safeguard geologic carbon storage.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Lawrence C. Murdoch
lmurdoc@clemson.edu
Clemson University

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Optica
A path to brighter images and more efficient LCD displays
University of Utah engineers have developed a polarizing filter that allows in more light, leading the way for mobile device displays that last much longer on a single battery charge and cameras that can shoot in dim light.
NASA, US Department of Energy, Utah Science Technology and Research Economic Development Initiative

Contact: Vince Horiuchi
vincent.horiuchi@utah.edu
801-585-7499
University of Utah

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
Nature Materials
Spiraling light, nanoparticles and insights into life's structure
As hands come in left and right versions that are mirror images of each other, so do the amino acids and sugars within us. But unlike hands, only the left-oriented amino acids and the right-oriented sugars ever make into life as we know it.
Center for Solar and Thermal Energy Conversion, Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Nicole Casal Moore
ncmoore@umich.edu
734-647-7087
University of Michigan

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Journal of the American Chemical Society
Scientists get to the heart of fool's gold as a solar material
As the installation of photovoltaic solar cells continues to accelerate, scientists are looking for inexpensive materials beyond the traditional silicon that can efficiently convert sunlight into electricity. Theoretically, iron pyrite could do the job, but when it works at all, the conversion efficiency remains frustratingly low. Now, a University of Wisconsin-Madison research team explains why that is, in a discovery that suggests how improvements in this promising material could lead to inexpensive yet efficient solar cells.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Song Jin
jin@chem.wisc.edu
608-262-1562
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
Researchers create & control spin waves, lifting prospects for enhanced info processing
A team of NYU and University of Barcelona physicists has developed a method to control the movements occurring within magnetic materials, which are used to store and carry information. The breakthrough could simultaneously bolster information processing while reducing the energy necessary to do so.
National Science Foundation, Army Research Office, US Department of Energy

Contact: James Devitt
james.devitt@nyu.edu
212-998-6808
New York University

Public Release: 11-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Bending -- but not breaking -- in search of new materials
Researchers at Drexel University and Dalian University of Technology in China have chemically engineered a new, electrically conductive nanomaterial that is flexible enough to fold, but strong enough to support many times its own weight. They believe it can be used to improve electrical energy storage, water filtration and radiofrequency shielding in technology from portable electronics to coaxial cables.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Britt Faulstick
bef29@drexel.edu
215-895-2617
Drexel University

Showing releases 1-25 out of 190.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

 

 

Text-Only | Privacy Policy | Site Map