U.S.Department of Energy Research News
Text-Only | Privacy Policy | Site Map  
Search Releases and Features  
Biological SciencesComputational SciencesEnergy SciencesEnvironmental SciencesPhysical SciencesEngineering and TechnologyNational Security Science

Home
Labs
Multimedia Resources
News Releases
Feature Stories
Library
Contacts
RSS Feed



US Department of Energy National Science Bowl


Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

NEWS FROM UNIVERSITIES AND OTHER DOE RESEARCH PARTNERS

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 95.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Physics Review Letters
Deceptive-looking vortex line in superfluid led to twice-mistaken identity
So long, solitons: University of Chicago physicists have shown that a group of scientists were incorrect when they concluded that a mysterious effect found in superfluids indicated the presence of solitons -- exotic, solitary waves. Instead, they explain, the result was due to more pedestrian, whirlpool-like structures in the fluid. They published their explanation in the Sept. 19 issue of Physical Review Letters.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, Hertz Foundation

Contact: Steve Koppes
skoppes@uchicago.edu
773-702-8366
University of Chicago

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society A
Adding uncertainty to improve mathematical models
Mathematicians from Brown University have introduced a new element of uncertainty into an equation used to describe the behavior of fluid flows. While being as certain as possible is generally the stock and trade of mathematics, the researchers hope this new formulation might ultimately lead to mathematical models that better reflect the inherent uncertainties of the natural world.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research, US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Kevin Stacey
kevin_stacey@brown.edu
401-863-3766
Brown University

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Nitrogen fingerprint in biomolecules could be from early sun
The pattern of nitrogen in biomolecules like proteins, which differ greatly from that seen in other parts of the solar system, could have been generated by the interactions of light from the early sun with nitrogen gas in the nebula, long before Earth formed.
NASA, US Department of Energy

Contact: Susan Brown
sdbrown@ucsd.edu
858-246-0161
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 24-Sep-2014
Advanced Functional Materials
Nanotechnology leads to better, cheaper LEDs for phones and lighting
Using a new nanoscale structure, the researchers, led by electrical engineering professor Stephen Chou, increased the brightness and efficiency of LEDs made of organic materials -- flexible carbon-based sheets -- by 57 percent. The researchers also report their method should yield similar improvements in LEDs made in inorganic, silicon-based materials used most commonly today.
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Office of Naval Research, US Department of Energy

Contact: John Sullivan
js29@princeton.edu
609-258-4597
Princeton University, Engineering School

Public Release: 24-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
2-D materials' crystalline defects key to new properties
Understanding how atoms 'glide' and 'climb' on the surface of 2-D crystals like tungsten disulphide may pave the way for researchers to develop materials with unusual or unique characteristics, according to an international team of researchers.
US Army Research Office, Robert Welch Foundation, National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 23-Sep-2014
Case Western Reserve University on track to become No. 1 synchrotron lab in world
Case Western Reserve University's synchrotron facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory is on its way to becoming the No. 1 beamline facility for biology in the world by early 2016, thanks to a jumpstart grant of $4.6 million from the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, a component of the National Institutes of Health.
NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Jeannette Spalding
jeannette.spalding@case.edu
216-368-3004
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 23-Sep-2014
American Journal of Sports Medicine
Does size matter? MRI imaging sheds light on athletes most at risk for severe knee injury
With only 200-300,000 per year, ACL injuries are far less common than ankle ligament injuries, which number more than two million annually. But ACL injuries can end sports careers and are proven to lead to the early onset of osteoarthritis, setting young athletes on a track towards joint replacement beginning as early as their 30s. Two Vermont studies provide greater clues about those most at risk.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Energy

Contact: Jennifer Nachbur
jennifer.nachbur@uvm.edu
802-656-7875
University of Vermont

Public Release: 23-Sep-2014
mBio
Critically ill ICU patients lose almost all of their gut microbes and the ones left aren't good
Researchers at the University of Chicago have shown that after a long stay in the Intensive Care Unit only a handful of pathogenic microbe species remain behind in patients' intestines. The team tested these remaining pathogens and discovered that some can become deadly when provoked by conditions that mimic the body's stress response to illness.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Energy

Contact: Jim Sliwa
jsliwa@asmusa.org
202-942-9297
American Society for Microbiology

Public Release: 22-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
University of Utah engineers unlock potential for faster computing
University of Utah engineers discovered a way to create a special material -- a metal layer on top of a silicon semiconductor -- that could lead to cost-effective, superfast computers that perform lightning-fast calculations but don't overheat. This new 'topological insulator' behaves like an insulator on the inside but conducts electricity on the outside and may pave the way for quantum computers and fast spintronic devices.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, University of Utah Materials Research Science and Engineering Center

Contact: Vince Horiuchi
vincent.horiuchi@utah.edu
801-585-7499
University of Utah

Public Release: 21-Sep-2014
Nature Materials
Smallest possible diamonds form ultra-thin nanothreads
For the first time, scientists have discovered how to produce ultra-thin 'diamond nanothreads' that promise extraordinary properties, including strength and stiffness greater than that of today's strongest nanotubes and polymers. The threads have a structure that has never been seen before.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Barbara K. Kennedy
science@psu.edu
814-863-4682
Penn State

Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
Nature Photonics
UChicago-Argonne National Lab team improves solar-cell efficiency
New light has been shed on solar power generation using devices made with polymers, thanks to a collaboration between scientists in the University of Chicago's chemistry department, the Institute for Molecular Engineering, and Argonne National Laboratory. Researchers identified a new polymer -- a type of large molecule that forms plastics and other familiar materials -- which improved the efficiency of solar cells.
National Science Foundation, Air Force Office of Scientific Research, US Department of Energy

Contact: Steve Koppes
skoppes@uchicago.edu
773-702-8366
University of Chicago

Public Release: 18-Sep-2014
Science
Nuclear spins control current in plastic LED
University of Utah physicists read 'spins' in hydrogen nuclei and used the data to control current in a cheap, plastic light emitting diode -- at room temperature and without strong magnetic fields. The study in Friday's issue of Science brings physics a step closer to practical machines that work 'spintronically:' super-fast quantum computers, more compact data storage devices and plastic or organic light-emitting diodes more efficient than those used today in displays for cell phones, computers and TVs.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Lee J. Siegel
lee.siegel@utah.edu
801-244-5399
University of Utah

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
Nano Letters
Phosphorus a promising semiconductor
The two-dimensional form of phosphorus may be a useful, flaw-resistant semiconductor for electronics. Theory shows the material's electronic properties are not affected by point defects or grain boundaries.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 4-Sep-2014
Optica
Atomically thin material opens door for integrated nanophotonic circuits
Researchers at the University of Rochester describe a new combination of materials that could be a step towards building computer chips capable of transporting digital information at the speed of light.
Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences, US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship

Contact: David Barnstone
dbarnsto@ur.rochester.edu
585-276-6264
University of Rochester

Public Release: 4-Sep-2014
Superconductor Science and Technology
Titania-based material holds promise as new insulator for superconductors
Research from North Carolina State University shows that a type of modified titania, or titanium dioxide, holds promise as an electrical insulator for superconducting magnets, allowing heat to dissipate while preserving the electrical paths along which current flows.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
UO-Berkeley Lab unveil new nano-sized synthetic scaffolding technique
Scientists, including University of Oregon chemist Geraldine Richmond, have tapped oil and water to create scaffolds of self-assembling, synthetic proteins called peptoid nanosheets that mimic complex biological mechanisms and processes.
US Department of Energy, Defense Threat Reduction Agency

Contact: Jim Barlow
jebarlow@uoregon.edu
541-346-3481
University of Oregon

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Case Western Reserve University wins grant to improve lifetime performance of ceramic fuel cells
Researchers at Case Western Reserve University received an $800,000 Department of Energy grant to study how to make one type of fuel cell -- solid oxide fuel cells -- last longer. The fuel cells suffer losses of efficiency and output as they age.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Kevin Mayhood
kevin.mayhood@case.edu
216-534-7183
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 1-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Sierra Nevada freshwater runoff could drop 26 percent by 2100, UC study finds
Freshwater runoff from the Sierra Nevada may decrease by as much as one-quarter by 2100 due to climate warming on the high slopes, according to scientists at UC Irvine and UC Merced.
National Science Foundation, Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory, US Department of Energy

Contact: Laura Rico
lrico@uci.edu
949-824-9055
University of California - Irvine

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Nature Materials
Scientists craft atomically seamless, thinnest-possible semiconductor junctions
The University of Washington researchers have demonstrated that two single-layer semiconductor materials can be connected in an atomically seamless fashion known as a heterojunction. This result could be the basis for next-generation flexible and transparent computing, better light-emitting diodes, or LEDs, and solar technologies.
US Department of Energy, UW/Clean Energy Institute, Research Grant Council of Hong Kong, University Grants Committee of Hong Kong, Croucher Foundation, Science City Research Alliance, Higher Education Funding Council for England

Contact: Michelle Ma
mcma@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
The Plant Cell
Researchers find boron facilitates stem cell growth and development in corn
The eastern half of the United States is plagued by boron deficient soil and corn and soybean farmers are required to supplement their soil with boron; however, little is known about the ways in which corn plants utilize the essential nutrient. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have found that boron plays an integral role in development and reproduction in corn plants. Understanding how corn uses the nutrient can help farmers improve crop yields.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Jeff Sossamon
sossamonj@missouri.edu
573-882-3346
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 22-Aug-2014
Nature Communications
Stanford scientists develop a water splitter that runs on an ordinary AAA battery
Although touted as zero-emissions vehicles, most fuel cell vehicle run on hydrogen made from natural gas. Now Stanford scientists have developed a low-cost, emissions-free device that uses an ordinary AAA battery to produce hydrogen by water electrolysis. Unlike other water splitters that use precious-metal catalysts, the electrodes in the Stanford device are made of inexpensive and abundant nickel and iron.
Precourt Institute for Energy and Global Climate & Energy Project, US Department of Energy

Contact: Mark Shwartz
mshwartz@stanford.edu
650-723-9296
Stanford University

Public Release: 21-Aug-2014
Science
Hot-spring bacteria reveal ability to use far-red light for photosynthesis
Bacteria growing in near darkness use a previously unknown process for harvesting energy and producing oxygen from sunlight, a research team led by a Penn State University scientist has discovered. The discovery lays the foundation for further research aimed at improving plant growth, harvesting energy from the sun, and understanding dense blooms like those now occurring on Lake Erie and other lakes worldwide.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Barbara K. Kennedy
science@psu.edu
814-863-4682
Penn State

Public Release: 21-Aug-2014
Science
New properties of rotating superfluids discovered in helium nanodroplets
Scientists explore the strange properties of 'superfluids' -- a new state of matter.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, Max Planck Society

Contact: Robert Perkins
perkinsr@usc.edu
213-740-9226
University of Southern California

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
High school students discover stars at SMU research program
Two Dallas high school students discovered five stars as members of a Southern Methodist University summer physics research program, QuarkNet, which enabled them to analyze data gleaned from a high-powered telescope in Los Alamos, N.M. Their discoveries have been accepted into the American Association of Variable Star Observers International Variable Star Index. QuarkNet is a physics teacher development program funded by the National Science Foundation and the US Department of Energy.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, CERN, Fermilab

Contact: Nancy George
ngeorge@smu.edu
214-768-7674
Southern Methodist University

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Bacterial nanowires: Not what we thought they were
Scientists have discovered that bacterial nanowires (which conduct electricity, allowing certain bacteria to breathe) are actually extensions of the bacteria's outer membrane -- not pili, as originally thought.
US Department of Energy, Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: Robert Perkins
perkinsr@usc.edu
213-740-9226
University of Southern California

Showing releases 1-25 out of 95.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

 

 

Text-Only | Privacy Policy | Site Map