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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

NEWS FROM UNIVERSITIES AND OTHER DOE RESEARCH PARTNERS

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 92.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

Public Release: 1-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Sierra Nevada freshwater runoff could drop 26 percent by 2100, UC study finds
Freshwater runoff from the Sierra Nevada may decrease by as much as one-quarter by 2100 due to climate warming on the high slopes, according to scientists at UC Irvine and UC Merced.
National Science Foundation, Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory, US Department of Energy

Contact: Laura Rico
lrico@uci.edu
949-824-9055
University of California - Irvine

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Nature Materials
Scientists craft atomically seamless, thinnest-possible semiconductor junctions
The University of Washington researchers have demonstrated that two single-layer semiconductor materials can be connected in an atomically seamless fashion known as a heterojunction. This result could be the basis for next-generation flexible and transparent computing, better light-emitting diodes, or LEDs, and solar technologies.
US Department of Energy, UW/Clean Energy Institute, Research Grant Council of Hong Kong, University Grants Committee of Hong Kong, Croucher Foundation, Science City Research Alliance, Higher Education Funding Council for England

Contact: Michelle Ma
mcma@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
The Plant Cell
Researchers find boron facilitates stem cell growth and development in corn
The eastern half of the United States is plagued by boron deficient soil and corn and soybean farmers are required to supplement their soil with boron; however, little is known about the ways in which corn plants utilize the essential nutrient. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have found that boron plays an integral role in development and reproduction in corn plants. Understanding how corn uses the nutrient can help farmers improve crop yields.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Jeff Sossamon
sossamonj@missouri.edu
573-882-3346
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 22-Aug-2014
Nature Communications
Stanford scientists develop a water splitter that runs on an ordinary AAA battery
Although touted as zero-emissions vehicles, most fuel cell vehicle run on hydrogen made from natural gas. Now Stanford scientists have developed a low-cost, emissions-free device that uses an ordinary AAA battery to produce hydrogen by water electrolysis. Unlike other water splitters that use precious-metal catalysts, the electrodes in the Stanford device are made of inexpensive and abundant nickel and iron.
Precourt Institute for Energy and Global Climate & Energy Project, US Department of Energy

Contact: Mark Shwartz
mshwartz@stanford.edu
650-723-9296
Stanford University

Public Release: 21-Aug-2014
Science
Hot-spring bacteria reveal ability to use far-red light for photosynthesis
Bacteria growing in near darkness use a previously unknown process for harvesting energy and producing oxygen from sunlight, a research team led by a Penn State University scientist has discovered. The discovery lays the foundation for further research aimed at improving plant growth, harvesting energy from the sun, and understanding dense blooms like those now occurring on Lake Erie and other lakes worldwide.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Barbara K. Kennedy
science@psu.edu
814-863-4682
Penn State

Public Release: 21-Aug-2014
Science
New properties of rotating superfluids discovered in helium nanodroplets
Scientists explore the strange properties of 'superfluids' -- a new state of matter.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, Max Planck Society

Contact: Robert Perkins
perkinsr@usc.edu
213-740-9226
University of Southern California

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
High school students discover stars at SMU research program
Two Dallas high school students discovered five stars as members of a Southern Methodist University summer physics research program, QuarkNet, which enabled them to analyze data gleaned from a high-powered telescope in Los Alamos, N.M. Their discoveries have been accepted into the American Association of Variable Star Observers International Variable Star Index. QuarkNet is a physics teacher development program funded by the National Science Foundation and the US Department of Energy.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, CERN, Fermilab

Contact: Nancy George
ngeorge@smu.edu
214-768-7674
Southern Methodist University

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Bacterial nanowires: Not what we thought they were
Scientists have discovered that bacterial nanowires (which conduct electricity, allowing certain bacteria to breathe) are actually extensions of the bacteria's outer membrane -- not pili, as originally thought.
US Department of Energy, Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: Robert Perkins
perkinsr@usc.edu
213-740-9226
University of Southern California

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Science
Seven tiny grains captured by Stardust likely visitors from interstellar space
The 1999 Stardust mission flew by comet Wild-2 in 2004, capturing cometary and interstellar dust, and delivered its dust-loaded collectors to Earth in 2006. Scientists led by University California -- Berkeley physicist Andrew Westphal now report preliminary results of their eight-year analysis of the interstellar particles: seven dust motes that likely originated in another solar system less than 100 million years ago. The particles are more diverse than expected, and fluffier, like a tossed salad.
NASA, US Department of Energy

Contact: Robert Sanders
rlsanders@berkeley.edu
510-643-6998
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 13-Aug-2014
Nano Letters
Eco-friendly 'pre-fab nanoparticles' could revolutionize nano manufacturing
A team of materials chemists, polymer scientists, device physicists and others at the University of Massachusetts Amherst today report a breakthrough technique for controlling molecular assembly of nanoparticles over multiple length scales that should allow faster, cheaper, more ecologically friendly manufacture of organic photovoltaics and other electronic devices. Details are in the current issue of Nano Letters.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 11-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
A global temperature conundrum: Cooling or warming climate?
When the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change recently requested a figure for its annual report, the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Zhengyu Liu knew that was going to be a problem. Writing in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences today, Liu and his colleagues describe a consistent global warming trend over the course of the Holocene counter to a study published last year that described a period of global cooling before human influence.
National Science Foundation, Chinese National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, Chinese Ministry of Science and Technology

Contact: Zhengyu Liu
zliu3@wisc.edu
608-262-0777
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 8-Aug-2014
Nature Communications
Water's reaction with metal oxides opens doors for researchers
A multi-institutional team has resolved a long-unanswered question about how two of the world's most common substances interact. In a paper published recently in the journal Nature Communications, Manos Mavrikakis, professor of chemical and biological engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and his collaborators report fundamental discoveries about how water reacts with metal oxides.
US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: Manos Mavrikakis
manos@engr.wisc.edu
608-215-3910
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 4-Aug-2014
Collaborative research uses camelina to build better biofuel
A Kansas State University biochemist has received a four-year $1.5 million joint US Department of Agriculture and Department of Energy grant to improve biofuels with a promising crop: Camelina sativa. The research may help boost rural economies and provide farmers with a value-added product.
US Department of Agriculture, US Department of Energy

Contact: Timothy Durrett
tdurrett@k-state.edu
785-532-3139
Kansas State University

Public Release: 1-Aug-2014
Nature Communications
Chemists develop MRI technique for peeking inside battery-like devices
A team of chemists from NYU and the University of Cambridge has developed a method for examining the inner workings of battery-like devices called supercapacitors, which can be charged up extremely quickly and can deliver high electrical power.
Northeastern Center for Chemical Energy Storage, US Department of Energy, NYSTAR

Contact: James Devitt
james.devitt@nyu.edu
212-998-6808
New York University

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
Angewandte Chemie International Edition
Carnegie Mellon chemists create nanofibers using unprecedented new method
Researchers from Carnegie Mellon University have developed a novel method for creating self-assembled protein/polymer nanostructures that are reminiscent of fibers found in living cells. The work offers a promising new way to fabricate materials for drug delivery and tissue engineering applications.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, Carnegie Mellon's Controlled Radical Polymerization, Oregon State University

Contact: Jocelyn Duffy
jhduffy@andrew.cmu.edu
412-268-9982
Carnegie Mellon University

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
Chemical Communications
Chemists demonstrate 'bricks-and-mortar' assembly of new molecular structures
Chemists at Indiana University Bloomington have described the self-assembly of large, symmetrical molecules in bricks-and-mortar fashion, a development with potential value for the field of organic electronic devices such as field-effect transistors and photovoltaic cells.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Steve Hinnefeld
slhinnef@iu.edu
812-856-3488
Indiana University

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
Journal of the American Chemical Society
Sugar mimics guide stem cells toward neural fate
Many growth factors that influence the fate of embryonic stem cells must bind to sugars attached to specific receptors on the surface of the cell to work. Because the sugars are difficult to manipulate, biochemists created synthetic stand ins that helped to identify substructures recognized by a growth factor involved in neural development.
NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, US Department of Energy

Contact: Susan Brown
sdbrown@ucsd.edu
858-246-0161
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
New catalyst converts carbon dioxide to fuel
Scientists from the University of Illinois at Chicago have synthesized a catalyst that improves their system for converting waste carbon dioxide into syngas, a precursor of gasoline and other energy-rich products, bringing the process closer to commercial viability.
American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund, National Science Foundation, University of Illinois at Chicago, US Department of Energy

Contact: Jeanne Galatzer-Levy
jgala@uic.edu
312-996-1583
University of Illinois at Chicago

Public Release: 28-Jul-2014
Physical Review Letters
Refrigerator magnets
A new theory from researchers at MIT predicts magnets may act as wireless cooling agents.
US Department of Energy, Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 28-Jul-2014
Ecological Complexity
Social network research may boost prairie dog conservation efforts
Researchers using statistical tools to map social connections in prairie dogs have uncovered relationships that escaped traditional observational techniques, shedding light on prairie dog communities that may help limit the spread of bubonic plague and guide future conservation efforts.
NESCent, NASA, US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
New approach to form non-equilibrium structures
Northwestern University researchers get closer to understanding the fundamentals of non-equilibrium, self-assembled structures, unlocking potential in a variety of fields.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Science
Atomic structure of key muscle component revealed in Penn study
Adding to the growing fundamental understanding of the machinery of muscle cells, a group of biophysicists from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania describe in the journal Science this week -- in minute detail -- how actin filaments are stabilized at one of their ends to form a basic muscle structure called the sarcomere.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, US Department of Energy

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 18-Jul-2014
It's go time for LUX-Zeplin dark matter experiment
From the physics labs at Yale University to the bottom of a played-out gold mine in South Dakota, a new generation of dark matter experiments is ready to commence. The US Department of Energy's Office of Science and the National Science Foundation recently gave the go-ahead to Large Underground Xenon-Zeplin, a key experiment in the hunt for dark matter, the invisible substance that may make up much of the universe.
US Department of Energy Office of Science, National Science Foundation

Contact: Jim Shelton
james.shelton@yale.edu
203-361-8332
Yale University

Public Release: 11-Jul-2014
Angewandte Chemie International Edition
NMR under pressure: Reproducing deep-Earth chemistry
A new pressure cell invented by UC Davis researchers makes it possible to simulate chemical reactions deep in the Earth's crust. The device could allow insights into deep-Earth chemistry and carbon cycling, 'fracking' and nuclear waste disposal.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Andy Fell
ahfell@ucdavis.edu
530-752-4533
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 10-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
University of Illinois study advances limits for ultrafast nano-devices
A recent study by researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign provides new insights on the physical mechanisms governing the interplay of spin and heat at the nanoscale, and addresses the fundamental limits of ultrafast spintronic devices for data storage and information processing.
Army Research Office, US Department of Energy Office of Basic Energy Sciences

Contact: David G. Cahill
d-cahill@illinois.edu
217-333-6753
University of Illinois College of Engineering

Showing releases 1-25 out of 92.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

 

 

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