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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

NEWS FROM UNIVERSITIES AND OTHER DOE RESEARCH PARTNERS

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 202.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Public Release: 8-Feb-2016
Nature Climate Change
Scientists say window to reduce carbon emissions is small
At the rate humans are emitting carbon into the atmosphere, the Earth may suffer irreparable damage that could last tens of thousands of years, according to a new analysis. Sea level rise is a critical issue. With seven degrees (Celsius) warming at the high-end scenario of temperature increase, the sea level rise is estimated at 50 meters, over a period of several centuries to millennia.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Peter Clark
clarkp@geo.oregonstate.edu
541-737-1247
Oregon State University

Public Release: 5-Feb-2016
Scientific Reports
From allergens to anodes: Pollen derived battery electrodes
Pollens, the bane of allergy sufferers, could represent a boon for battery makers: Recent research has suggested their potential use as anodes in lithium-ion batteries.
US Department of Energy

Contact: emil venere
venere@purdue.edu
765-494-4709
Purdue University

Public Release: 5-Feb-2016
Scientific Reports
The iron stepping stones to better wearable tech without semiconductors
The way to better wearable electronics is dotted with iron steppingstones. Check out how Michigan Tech researcher Yoke Khin Yap's nanotubes bridge the gap with quantum tunneling.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Yoke Khin Yap
ykyap@mtu.edu
906-487-2900
Michigan Technological University

Public Release: 3-Feb-2016
Physical Review Letters
Galactic center's gamma rays unlikely to originate from dark matter, evidence shows
Studies by two independent groups from the US and the Netherlands have found that gamma ray signals from the inner galaxy come from a new source rather than from the collision of dark matter particles. The new source is likely to be rapidly rotating pulsars, rather than the as-yet undetected invisible dark matter particles thought to make up 85 percent of the mass in the Universe.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Catherine Zandonella
czandone@princeton.edu
609-258-0541
Princeton University

Public Release: 2-Feb-2016
Metallurgical and Materials Transactions E
Extracting rare-earth elements from coal could soon be economical in US
The US could soon decrease its dependence on importing valuable rare-earth elements that are widely used in many industries, according to a team of Penn State and US Department of Energy researchers who found a cost-effective and environmentally friendly way to extract these metals from coal byproducts.
US Department of Energy

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 28-Jan-2016
Nature Communications
Small is different
In the production of margarine millions of tons of unsaturated fatty acids are converted from vegetable oils using hydrogen. While searching for improved catalysts for these so-called hydrogenation reactions, a German-American research team made a discovery that puts a 50-year old rule in question: In catalytic particles comprising only a few atoms, shape and size influence reactivity much more strongly then previously thought.
European Research Council, US Air Force Office for Scientific Research, Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the US Department of Energy

Contact: Dr. Andreas Battenberg
battenberg@zv.tum.de
49-892-891-0510
Technical University of Munich (TUM)

Public Release: 28-Jan-2016
Nature Communications
For this nanocatalyst reaction, one atom makes a big difference
Combining experimental investigations and theoretical simulations, researchers have explained why platinum nanoclusters of a specific size range facilitate the hydrogenation reaction used to produce ethane from ethylene.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the US Department of Energy

Contact: John Toon
jtoon@gatech.edu
404-894-6986
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 27-Jan-2016
Nature
Let them see you sweat: What new wearable sensors can reveal from perspiration
UC Berkeley engineers have developed the first fully integrated electronic system that can provide continuous, noninvasive monitoring of multiple biochemicals in sweat. The advance opens doors to wearable devices that alert users to health problems such as fatigue, dehydration and dangerously high body temperatures.
Berkeley Sensor & Actuator Center, National Institutes of Health, US Department of Energy

Contact: Sarah Yang
scyang@berkeley.edu
510-643-7741
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 27-Jan-2016
Nature
Stanford-Berkeley device detects, analyzes changes in composition of sweat
A team of researchers at Stanford University and the University of California-Berkeley has combined two technologies to create a health monitoring device that is noninvasive, doesn't interfere with strenuous outdoor activities and can continuously track a user's health at molecular levels.
National Institutes of Health, Berkeley Sensor & Actuator Center, US Department of Energy

Contact: Jennie Dusheck
dusheck@stanford.edu
650-725-5376
Stanford University Medical Center

Public Release: 25-Jan-2016
Physical Review Letters
In galaxy clustering, mass may not be the only thing that matters
An international team of researchers has shown that the relationship between galaxy clusters and their surrounding dark matter halo is more complex than previously thought. The researchers' findings, published in Physical Review Letters today (Jan. 25), are the first to use observational data to show that, in addition to mass, a galaxy cluster's formation history plays a role in how it interacts with its environment.
Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, World Premier International Research Center Initiative, FIRST program, National Science Foundation, NASA, US Department of Energy

Contact: Jocelyn Duffy
jhduffy@andrew.cmu.edu
412-268-9982
Carnegie Mellon University

Public Release: 21-Jan-2016
Atmospheric Environment
Storms, ozone may play pivotal role in rainforest cloud creation
Some storms transport ozone molecules to the canopy of the rainforest, influencing chemical processes that ultimately affect cloud formation, according to an international research team led by Penn State. The team conducted a nine-month study in the central Amazon rainforest of Brazil and their findings could be used to improve climate prediction models to more accurately gauge the Amazon's impact on future global weather patterns.
US Department of Energy

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 21-Jan-2016
Nuclear Fusion
New finding may explain heat loss in fusion reactors
Solving a longstanding mystery, MIT experiments reveal two forms of turbulence interacting.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 20-Jan-2016
Nature
After repeated pounding, antihydrogen reveals its charge: Zero
Per the Standard Model of Particle Physics, the electrical charge of matter and antimatter should be opposite and equal. But is that true? A UC Berkeley-led team used the antihydrogen trap of the ALPHA collaboration at CERN to test this by measuring the charges of these anti-atoms. By randomly hitting trapped antihydrogen with an electric field, they were able to determine that the anti-atom is neutral to 0.7 ppb: 20 times better than earlier bounds.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Robert Sanders
rlsanders@berkeley.edu
510-643-6998
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 20-Jan-2016
RIT receives major grant to assess needs of electric control center operators
Researchers at Rochester Institute of Technology received a grant from the US Department of Energy as part of the Bonneville Power Administration Technology Innovation Project to find easier ways for electric control center operators to process critical situations.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Greg Livadas
Greg.Livadas@rit.edu
585-475-6217
Rochester Institute of Technology

Public Release: 19-Jan-2016
Geophysical Research Letters
Warmer oceans could produce more powerful superstorms
A new study suggests that a warmer Atlantic Ocean could substantially boost the destructive power of a future superstorm like Hurricane Sandy. The researchers used a numerical model to simulate the weather patterns that created Sandy, with one key difference: a warmer sea surface temperature, as would be expected in a world with twice as much carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. This simulated warmer ocean generated storms 50 to 160 percent more destructive than Sandy.
NASA, US Department of Energy

Contact: Matthew Wright
mewright@umd.edu
301-405-9267
University of Maryland

Public Release: 18-Jan-2016
Nature Physics
Seeing where energy goes may bring scientists closer to realizing nuclear fusion
An international team of researchers has taken a step toward achieving controlled nuclear fusion -- a process that powers the sun and other stars, and has the potential to supply the world with limitless, clean energy. The team, led by researchers at the University of California, San Diego and General Atomics, developed a new technique to 'see' where energy is delivered during fast ignition experiments and improve energy delivery to the fuel target.
US Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Agency, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences Fusion Science Center, OFES ACE Fast Ignition, National Nuclear Security Administration

Contact: Liezel Labios
llabios@ucsd.edu
858-246-1124
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 14-Jan-2016
Nature Communications
Fuel cell advance
Researchers from the University of Delaware and Beijing University of Chemical Technology report a breakthrough in Nature Communications that promises to bring down the cost of hydrogen fuel cells by replacing expensive platinum catalysts with cheaper ones made from metals like nickel.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Peter Bothum
pbothum@udel.edu
302-831-1418
University of Delaware

Public Release: 11-Jan-2016
Nature Nanotechnology
Recycling light
In a study published in Nature Nanotechnology, a team of MIT researchers describes a way to recycle light emitted at unwanted infrared wavelengths while optimizing the emission at useful visible wavelengths. While as a proof-of-concept the research group built a more energy-efficient incandescent light bulb, the same approach could also be used to improve the performance of other hot thermal emitters, including thermo-photovoltaic devices.
Solid-State Solar Thermal Energy Conversion Center, US Department of Energy, Army Research Office through the Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies

Contact: Ognjen Ilic
ilico@mit.edu
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies

Public Release: 4-Jan-2016
Nature Chemistry
IU scientists create 'nano-reactor' for the production of hydrogen biofuel
Scientists at Indiana University have created a highly efficient biomaterial that catalyzes the formation of hydrogen -- one half of the 'holy grail' of splitting H2O to make hydrogen and oxygen for fueling cheap and efficient cars that run on water.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Kevin Fryling
kfryling@iu.edu
812-856-2988
Indiana University

Public Release: 30-Dec-2015
Increasing LNG exports 'marginally positive' for US economy
Increasing the United States' export of liquefied natural gas above 12 billion cubic feet per day would allow the US to continue to provide a competitive advantage for domestic natural-gas-intensive industries relative to their counterparts overseas, according to a new Rice University paper.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 28-Dec-2015
Advanced Functional Materials
New acoustic technique reveals structural information in nanoscale materials
Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology and Oak Ridge National Laboratory have developed a new nondestructive technique for investigating phase transitions in materials by examining the acoustic response at the nanoscale.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: John Toon
jtoon@gatech.edu
404-894-6986
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 22-Dec-2015
Journal of Biological Inorganic Chemistry
UGA research links inorganic mercury exposure to damaged cell processes
University of Georgia research has found that inorganic mercury, which was previously thought to be a less harmful form of the toxic metal, is very damaging to key cell processes.
US Department of Energy, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Stephanie Schupska
schupska@uga.edu
706-542-6927
University of Georgia

Public Release: 21-Dec-2015
Nature Climate Change
Evergreens at risk
In a broad analysis of climate change scenarios, researchers see a grim future for evergreen forests in the Southwest region of the United States. Using field reports, validated regional predictions and computer models, they project a 72 percent loss of needleleaf evergreens by 2050, almost 100 percent by 2100.
US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Los Alamos National Lab/Lab Directed Research and Development, National Science Foundation, US Department of Agriculture, US Geological Survey Climate and Land Use Program

Contact: Peter Bothum
pbothum@udel.edu
302-831-1418
University of Delaware

Public Release: 21-Dec-2015
US Department of Energy awards $13.5 million to enhance sorghum for biofuel
The Danforth Center takes part in a multi-institutional research effort to improve sorghum as a sustainable source for biofuel production.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Melanie Bernds
mbernds@danforthcenter.org
314-587-1647
Donald Danforth Plant Science Center

Public Release: 21-Dec-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Methane emissions in Arctic cold season higher than expected
The amount of methane gas escaping from the ground during the long cold period in the Arctic each year and entering Earth's atmosphere is likely much higher than estimated by current climate change models. Far more methane is escaping from Arctic tundra during the cold months -- when the soil surface is frozen -- as well as from upland tundra, than prevailing assumptions and climate modelers previously believed.
National Science Foundation, NASA, US Department of Energy

Contact: Beth Chee
bchee@mail.sdsu.edu
619-594-4563
San Diego State University

Showing releases 1-25 out of 202.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

 

 

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