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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 26-49 out of 49.

<< < 1 | 2

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
Anasys licenses ORNL nanoscale mass spectrometry imaging technology
Anasys Instruments Corp. has licensed a technology that allows for simultaneous chemical and physical characterization and could lead to advances in materials and drug development.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-1946
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Apr-2014
Nature Materials
Glasses strong as steel: A fast way to find the best
Scientists at Yale have devised a dramatically faster way of identifying and characterizing complex alloys known as bulk metallic glasses, a versatile type of pliable glass that's stronger than steel.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Eric Gershon
eric.gershon@yale.edu
203-432-8555
Yale University

Public Release: 11-Apr-2014
Two Ames Laboratory science interns are awarded prestigious scholarships
Two participants in the US Department of Energy Office of Science's Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship research program at the DOE's Ames Laboratory have been awarded prestigious scholarships, one from the Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship and Excellence in Education Program and the other from the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship program.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Apr-2014
Soukoulis wins 2014 Max Born Award
Costas Soukoulis, senior scientist at the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory, Distinguished Professor of Physics and Astronomy at Iowa State University and associated member of IESL-FORTH in Greece, has won the 2014 Max Born Award from the Optical Society of America. The award honors a scientist who has made outstanding contributions to the scientific field of physical optics.

Contact: Breehan Gerleman Lucchesi
breehan@ameslab.gov
515-294-9750
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Apr-2014
Princeton, PPPL join major arms-control project
Princeton University and the Princeton Plasma Physics Physics Laboratory have joined a $25 million consortium to address technology and policy issues related to arms control.
National Nuclear Security Administration

Contact: John Greenwald
609-243-2672
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Researchers bolster development of programmable quantum computers
University of Chicago researchers and their colleagues at University College London have performed a proof-of-concept experiment that will aid the future development of programmable quantum computers.
US Department of Energy, UK's Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council

Contact: Steve Koppes
skoppes@uchicago.edu
773-702-8366
University of Chicago

Public Release: 10-Apr-2014
Nature Communications
Sunlight generates hydrogen in new porous silicon
Porous silicon manufactured in a bottom up procedure using solar energy can be used to generate hydrogen from water, according to a team of Penn State mechanical engineers, who also see applications for batteries, biosensors and optical electronics as outlets for this new material.
US Department of Energy, Defense Threat Reduction Agency

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 9-Apr-2014
SAE 2014 World Congress & Exhibition
ORNL study pegs fuel economy costs of common practices
People who pack their cars and drive like Clark Griswold in National Lampoon's 'Vacation' pay a steep penalty when it comes to fuel economy.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Apr-2014
Joint Brazilian/US project to study formation of rain in the Amazon rainforest
Triggering rainfall in the Brazilian Amazon jungle is the focus of a Penn State/Brazilian project that is part of the GoAmazon program sponsored by the US Department of Energy and Brazilian agencies.
US Department of Energy

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 9-Apr-2014
Nature
Stanford scientists discover a novel way to make ethanol without corn or other plants
Stanford scientists have created a copper-based catalyst that produces large quantities of ethanol from carbon monoxide gas at room temperature. This promising discovery could provide an eco-friendly alternative to conventional ethanol production from corn and other crops, say the scientists.
Stanford University, US Department of Energy

Contact: Mark Shwartz
mshwartz@stanford.edu
650-723-9296
Stanford University

Public Release: 8-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Tracking sugar movement in plants
Study overturns long-held belief that plant hormones control the shape of plant growth. Instead, it has shown that this process starts with sugar.
Australian Research Council, DOE/Office of Science, Goldhaber Fellowship

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 7-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Scientists find missing piece of air particle equation hiding in the walls
A new study from UC Davis and California Institute of Technology showed that vapor losses to the walls of laboratory chambers can suppress the formation of secondary organic aerosol, which in turn has contributed to the underprediction of SOA in climate and air quality models.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, California Air Resources Board

Contact: Christopher Cappa
cdcappa@ucdavis.edu
530-752-8180
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 7-Apr-2014
2014 American Physical Society April Meeting
Astronomy & Astrophysics
BOSS quasars track the expanding universe -- most precise measurement yet
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory scientists and their colleagues have made novel measurements of the structure of the universe when it was only about 3 billion years old, using quasars collected by the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). Results include the most precise measurement of expansion since galaxies formed. BOSS, the largest component of the third Sloan Digital Sky Survey, pioneered the use of quasars to chart universal expansion and the role of dark energy.
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, SDSS-III Participating Institutions, National Science Foundation, DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Paul Preuss
paul_preuss@lbl.gov
415-272-3253
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Apr-2014
Nature Physics
Groundbreaking optical device could enhance optical information processing, computers
At St. Paul's Cathedral in London, a section of the dome called the Whispering Gallery makes a whisper audible from the other side of the dome as a result of the way sound waves travel around the curved surface. Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis have used the same phenomenon to build an optical device that may lead to new and more powerful computers that run faster and cooler.
Army Research Office, US Department of Energy

Contact: Neil Schoenherr
nschoenherr@wustl.edu
314-935-5235
Washington University in St. Louis

Public Release: 6-Apr-2014
Nature Climate Change
Researchers find arid areas absorb unexpected amounts of atmospheric carbon
Researchers led by a Washington State University biologist have found that arid areas, among the biggest ecosystems on the planet, take up an unexpectedly large amount of carbon as levels of carbon dioxide increase in the atmosphere. The findings give scientists a better handle on the earth's carbon budget -- how much carbon remains in the atmosphere as CO2, contributing to global warming, and how much gets stored in the land or ocean in other carbon-containing forms.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: R. Dave Evans
rdevans@wsu.edu
509-335-7466
Washington State University

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
Nano Letters
To bridge LEDs' green gap, scientists think small... really small
Nanostructures half the breadth of a DNA strand could improve the efficiency of light emitting diodes, especially in the 'green gap,' simulations at the US Department of Energy's National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center have shown. Nanostructure LEDs made from indium nitride could lead to more natural-looking white lighting while avoiding some of the efficiency loss today's LEDs experience at high power.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Margie Wylie
mwylie@lbl.gov
510-486-7421
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Apr-2014
Science
Off the shelf, on the skin: Stick-on electronic patches for health monitoring
Wearing a fitness tracker on your wrist or clipped to your belt is so 2013. Engineers at the University of Illinois and Northwestern University have demonstrated thin, soft stick-on patches that stretch and move with the skin and incorporate off-the-shelf electronics for sophisticated wireless health monitoring. The patches stick to the skin like a temporary tattoo and incorporate a unique microfluidic construction with wires folded like origami to allow the patch to bend and flex.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Liz Ahlberg
eahlberg@illinois.edu
217-244-1073
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 3-Apr-2014
Science
'Unzipping' poplars' biofuel potential
What began 20 years ago as an innovation to improve paper industry processes and dairy forage digestibility may now open the door to a much more energy- and cost-efficient way to convert biomass into fuel.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Layne Cameron
layne.cameron@cabs.msu.edu
517-353-8819
Michigan State University

Public Release: 2-Apr-2014
Americans using more energy according to Lawrence Livermore analysis
Americans used more renewable, fossil and even nuclear energy in 2013, according to the most recent energy flow charts released by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 1-Apr-2014
Energy Systems Integration Facility named Lab of the Year
The editors of R&D Magazine have named the Energy Department's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) as the 2014 Laboratory of the Year. Located on the campus of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colo., research at ESIF transforms how the nation generates, delivers and uses energy by modernizing the interplay between energy sources, infrastructure, and data.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 1-Apr-2014
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, April 2014
This release focuses on: 1) Bridge failure warning. 2) Simulations on Titan could help automobile manufacturers meet fuel economy and emissions standards. 3) New system enables decision-makers to respond swiftly to major power disruptions. 4) Refrigerators featuring 20 percent greater efficiency.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 1-Apr-2014
Resilient cities focus of new Sandia, Rockefeller Foundation pact to help 100 communities
Sandia National Laboratories will bring decades of experience solving problems with practical engineering and modeling complex systems to cities around the world under a new agreement to support the 100 Resilient Cities Centennial Challenge, pioneered by the Rockefeller Foundation.

Contact: Heather Clark
hclark@sandia.gov
505-844-3511
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 31-Mar-2014
Climate Dynamics
Warming climate may spread drying to a third of earth, says study
A new study published this month in the journal Climate Dynamics estimates that 12 percent of land will be subject to drought by 2100 through rainfall changes alone; but the drying will spread to 30 percent of land if higher evaporation rates are considered. An increase in evaporative drying means that even regions expected to get more rain, including important wheat, corn and rice belts in the western United States and southeastern China, will be at risk of drought.
NOAA, US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Kim Martineau
kmartine@ldeo.columbia.edu
646-717-0134
The Earth Institute at Columbia University

Public Release: 31-Mar-2014
Applied Energy
Hybrid vehicles more fuel efficient in India, China than in US
What makes cities in India and China so frustrating to drive in -- heavy traffic, aggressive driving style, few freeways -- makes them ideal for saving fuel with hybrid vehicles, according to new research by scientists at the US Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. In a pair of studies using real-world driving conditions, they found that hybrid cars are significantly more fuel-efficient in India and China than they are in the United States.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Julie Chao
jhchao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Showing releases 26-49 out of 49.

<< < 1 | 2

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