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NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-6 out of 6.

Public Release: 20-Mar-2014
Nature Communications
Scientists discover potential way to make graphene superconducting
Scientists have discovered a potential way to make graphene -- a single layer of carbon atoms with great promise for future electronics -- superconducting, a state in which it would carry electricity with 100 percent efficiency.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Andy Freeberg
afreeberg@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-4359
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Feb-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
New 'pomegranate-inspired' design solves problems for lithium-ion batteries
A novel battery electrode features silicon nanoparticles clustered like pomegranate seeds in a tough carbon rind. The Stanford/SLAC design could enable smaller, lighter rechargeable batteries for electric cars, cell phones and other devices.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Andy Freeberg
afreeberg@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-4359
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 19-Dec-2013
Science
X-ray laser maps important drug target
Researchers have used one of the brightest X-ray sources on the planet to map the 3-D structure of an important cellular gatekeeper known as a G protein-coupled receptor, or GPCR, in a more natural state than possible before.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Angela Anderson
angelaa@SLAC.stanford.edu
650-926-3505
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Nov-2013
Nature
Scientists prove X-ray laser can solve protein structures from scratch
A study shows for the first time that X-ray lasers can be used to generate a complete 3-D model of a protein without any prior knowledge of its structure.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Andy Freeberg
afreeberg@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-4359
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Nov-2013
Physical Review Letters
Will 2-D tin be the next super material?
A single layer of tin atoms could be the world's first material to conduct electricity with 100 percent efficiency at the temperatures that computer chips operate, according to a team of theoretical physicists led by researchers from the US Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University.
Stanford University, US Department of Energy, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

Contact: Andy Freeberg
afreeberg@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-4359
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Nov-2013
Nature Chemistry
Scientists invent self-healing battery electrode
Researchers have made the first battery electrode that heals itself, opening a new and potentially commercially viable path for making the next generation of lithium ion batteries for electric cars, cell phones and other devices. The secret is a stretchy polymer that coats the electrode, binds it together and spontaneously heals tiny cracks that develop during battery operation, said the team from Stanford University and the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Andy Freeberg
afreeberg@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-4359
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Showing releases 1-6 out of 6.

 

 

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