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DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-13 out of 13.

Public Release: 12-Feb-2015
Science
Scientists get first glimpse of a chemical bond being born
Scientists have used an X-ray laser at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory to get the first glimpse of the transition state where two atoms begin to form a weak bond on the way to becoming a molecule.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Feb-2015
Nature Communications
Scientists take first X-ray portraits of living bacteria at the LCLS
Researchers working at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have captured the first X-ray portraits of living bacteria. This milestone, reported in the Feb. 11 issue of Nature Communications, is a first step toward possible X-ray explorations of the molecular machinery at work in viral infections, cell division, photosynthesis and other processes that are important to biology, human health and our environment.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Feb-2015
2015 AAAS Annual Meeting
SLAC Researchers to present at AAAS 2015
SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory researchers will share the latest discoveries and innovations in a wide range of fields at this year's AAAS Annual Meeting including X-ray lasers, quantum materials, citizen science, new materials for electronics, cosmology visualization, computer-aided catalyst design, next-generation batteries, accelerators, advanced adaptive optics, cosmic inflation and nanoscale optical tomography.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Jan-2015
World's most powerful camera receives funding approval
Plans for the construction of the world's largest digital camera at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have reached a major milestone. The 3,200-megapixel centerpiece of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, which will provide unprecedented details of the universe and help address some of its biggest mysteries, has received key 'Critical Decision 2' approval from the DOE.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 12-Nov-2014
Nature
Study at SLAC explains atomic action in high-temperature superconductors
A study at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory suggests for the first time how scientists might deliberately engineer superconductors that work at higher temperatures.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 5-Nov-2014
Nature
Researchers hit milestone in accelerating particles with plasma
Scientists from the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and the University of California, Los Angeles have shown that a promising technique for accelerating electrons on waves of plasma is efficient enough to power a new generation of shorter, more economical accelerators. This could greatly expand their use in areas such as medicine, national security, industry and high-energy physics research.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Sep-2014
Nature Materials
Study sheds new light on why batteries go bad
A comprehensive look at how tiny particles in a lithium ion battery electrode behave shows that rapid-charging the battery and using it to do high-power, rapidly draining work may not be as damaging as researchers had thought -- and that the benefits of slow draining and charging may have been overestimated. The results challenge the prevailing view that 'supercharging' batteries is always harder on battery electrodes than charging at slower rates.
Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Stanford University, the Samsung-MIT Program for Materials Design in Energy Applications, U.S. Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
Buckyballs and diamondoids join forces in tiny electronic gadget
Scientists have married two unconventional forms of carbon -- one shaped like a soccer ball, the other a tiny diamond -- to make a molecule that conducts electricity in only one direction. This tiny electronic component, known as a rectifier, could play a key role in shrinking chip components down to the size of molecules to enable faster, more powerful devices.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Aug-2014
Science
X-ray laser probes tiny quantum tornadoes in superfluid droplets
An experiment at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory revealed a well-organized 3-D grid of quantum 'tornadoes' inside microscopic droplets of supercooled liquid helium -- the first time this formation has been seen at such a tiny scale. The findings by an international research team provide new insight on the strange nanoscale traits of a so-called 'superfluid' state of liquid helium.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Jul-2014
Science
Uncertainty gives scientists new confidence in search for novel materials
Scientists at Stanford University and the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have found a way to estimate uncertainties in computer calculations that are widely used to speed the search for new materials for industry, electronics, energy, drug design and a host of other applications. The technique, reported in the July 11 issue of Science, should quickly be adopted in studies that produce some 30,000 scientific papers per year.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.standford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Jun-2014
Nature Communications
Scientists use X-rays to look at how DNA protects itself from UV light
The molecular building blocks that make up DNA absorb ultraviolet light so strongly that sunlight should deactivate them -- yet it does not. Now scientists have made detailed observations of a 'relaxation response' that protects these molecules, and the genetic information they encode, from UV damage.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.standford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Jun-2014
Nature
Scientists take first dip into water's mysterious 'no-man's land'
Scientists at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have made the first structural observations of liquid water at temperatures down to minus 51 degrees Fahrenheit, within an elusive 'no-man's land' where water's strange properties are super-amplified.
US Department of Energy's Office of Science

Contact: Andy Freeberg
afreeberg@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-4359
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Mar-2014
Nature Communications
Scientists discover potential way to make graphene superconducting
Scientists have discovered a potential way to make graphene -- a single layer of carbon atoms with great promise for future electronics -- superconducting, a state in which it would carry electricity with 100 percent efficiency.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Andy Freeberg
afreeberg@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-4359
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Showing releases 1-13 out of 13.

 

 

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