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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 91.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

Public Release: 26-Jun-2015
Science
Orange is the new red
Berkeley Lab researchers discovered that a photoprotective mechanism in cyanobacteria is triggered by an unprecedented, large-scale movement from one location to another of the carotenoid pigment within the Orange Carotenoid Protein.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Jun-2015
Nature Communications
Opening a new route to photonics
Berkeley scientists have developed a technique for effectively controlling pulses of light in closely packed nanoscale waveguides, an essential requirement for ultrahigh density, ultracompact integrated photonic circuitry.
Office of Naval Research

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Jun-2015
Nature Communications
A new look at surface chemistry
A multi-institutional team of researchers, including scientists from Berkeley Lab have used a new scanning electron microscopy technique to resolve the unique atomic structure at the surface of a material. This new technique holds promise for the study of catalysis, corrosion and other critical chemical reactions.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Jun-2015
Chemical Physics Letters
Unravelling the mysteries of carbonic acid
Berkeley Lab researchers report the first detailed characterization of the hydration structure of carbonic dioxide gas as it dissolves in water to form carbonic acid. Though carbonic acid exists for only a fraction of a second, it imparts a lasting impact on Earth's atmosphere and geology, and on the human body.

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Leaving on a biofueled jet plane
Researchers at the Energy Biosciences Institute have developed a catalytic process for converting sugarcane biomass into a new class of aviation fuel and lubricant base oils that could help biorefineries achieve net life-cycle greenhouse gas savings of up to 80 percent.
Energy Biosciences Institute, BP

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Jun-2015
North to Alaska: Researchers rush to understand warming trend
Berkeley Lab scientists Sebastien Biraud and Margaret Torn are leading an aerial campaign for DOE's Atmospheric Measurement Research Climate Research Facility over Alaska's North Slope to take air samples and find out why current climate models underestimate how rapidly the Arctic is getting warmer.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Julie Chao
JHChao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 1-Jun-2015
Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
Using robots at Berkeley Lab, scientists assemble promising antimicrobial compounds
There's an urgent demand for new antimicrobial compounds that are effective against constantly emerging drug-resistant bacteria. Two robotic chemical-synthesizing machines at the Molecular Foundry have joined the search.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-May-2015
Journal of Synchrotron Radiation
On-demand X-rays at synchrotron light sources
Researchers at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source have developed an 'X-rays on demand' technique in which ALS users can have access to the X-ray beams they want without affecting beams for other users.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-May-2015
Advanced Materials
Defects can 'Hulk-up' materials
A Berkeley Lab study has shown that just as exposure to gamma radiation transforms Bruce Banner into fictional superhero the Hulk, exposure to alpha-particle radiation can transform thermoelectric materials into far more powerful versions of themselves.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-May-2015
Nature
Supernova hunting with supercomputers
Type Ia supernovae are famous for their consistency. Ironically, new observations suggest that their origins may not be uniform. Using a 'roadmap' of theoretical calculations and supercomputer simulations performed by Berkeley Lab's Daniel Kasen, astronomers observed a flash of light caused by a supernova slamming into a nearby star, allowing them to determine the stellar system from which the supernova was born. This finding confirms one of two competing theories about Type Ia supernovae birth.

Contact: Linda Vu
lvu@lbl.gov
510-495-2402
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-May-2015
Nano Letters
CLAIRE brings electron microscopy to soft materials
Berkeley Lab researchers, working at the Molecular Foundry, have invented a technique called 'CLAIRE' that extends the incredible resolution of electron microscopy to the noninvasive nanoscale imaging of soft matter, including biomolecules.
US Department of Energy Office of Science, National Science Foundation

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 12-May-2015
mBio
Using microbial communities to assess environmental contamination
A study sponsored by ENIGMA, a DOE 'Scientific Focus Area Program' based at the Berkeley Lab has found that statistical analysis of DNA from natural microbial communities can be used to accurately identify environmental contaminants and serve as quantitative geochemical biosensors.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-May-2015
Nature
Channeling valleytronics in graphene
Berkeley Lab researchers, working at the Advanced Light Source, have discovered topologically protected 1-D electron conducting channels at the domain walls of bilayer graphene that should prove useful for valleytronics.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 5-May-2015
Astrophysical Journal
A hot start to the origin of life?
Researchers from Berkeley Lab and the University of Hawaii at Manoa have shown for the first time that cosmic hot spots, such as those near stars, could be excellent environments for the creation of molecular precursors to DNA.
US Department of Energy, Office of Science

Contact: Kate Greene
kgreene@lbl.gov
415-486-4404
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Apr-2015
Counting all costs, Berkeley Lab researchers find that saving energy is still cheap
Researchers at Berkeley Lab have conducted the most comprehensive study yet of the full cost of saving electricity by US utility efficiency programs and now have an answer: 4.6 cents. That's the average total cost of saving a kilowatt-hour in 20 states from 2009 to 2013.
US Department of Energy's Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis

Contact: Jon Weiner
jrweiner@lbl.gov
510-486-4014
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Apr-2015
NERSC, Cray move forward with next-generation scientific computing
The US Department of Energy's National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center and Cray Inc. announced today that they have finalized a new contract for a Cray XC40 supercomputer that will be the first NERSC system installed in the newly built Computational Research and Theory facility at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

Contact: Jon Bashor
jbashor@lbl.gov
510-486-5849
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Apr-2015
Nano Letters
Major advance in artificial photosynthesis poses win/win for the environment
By combining biocompatible light-capturing nanowire arrays with select bacterial populations, a potentially game-changing new artificial photosynthesis system offers a win/win situation for the environment: solar-powered green chemistry using sequestered carbon dioxide.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Apr-2015
Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells
New 'cool roof time machine' will accelerate cool roof deployment
A collaboration led by Berkeley Lab scientists has established a method to simulate in the lab the soiling and weathering of roofing materials, reproducing in only a few days the solar reflectance of roofing products naturally aged for three years. Now this protocol has been approved by American Society for Testing and Materials International as a standard practice for the industry.
US Deptartment of Energy

Contact: Julie Chao
JHChao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Apr-2015
Nature Communications
On the road to spin-orbitronics
Berkeley Lab researchers have discovered a new way of manipulating the magnetic domain walls in ultrathin magnets that could one day revolutionize the electronics industry through a technology called 'spin-orbitronics.'
US Department of Energy

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Apr-2015
Scientific Data
Accelerating materials discovery with world's largest database of elastic properties
Scientists at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have published the world's largest set of data on the complete elastic properties of inorganic compounds, increasing by an order of magnitude the number of compounds for which such data exists.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Julie Chao
JHChao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 1-Apr-2015
New research project to study how tropical forests worldwide respond to climate change
Tropical forests play major roles in regulating Earth's climate, but there are large uncertainties over how they'll respond over the next 100 years as the planet's climate warms. An expansive new project led by scientists from Berkeley Lab aims to bring the future of tropical forests and the climate system into much clearer focus. The project is called the Next Generation Ecosystem Experiments-Tropics, or NGEE-Tropics.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 31-Mar-2015
Nature Communications
Skin tough
A collaboration of Berkeley Lab and UC San Diego researchers has recorded the first direct observations of the micro-scale mechanisms behind the ability of skin to resist tearing. The results could be applied to the improvement of artificial skin, or to the development of thin film polymers for flexible electronics.
US Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
Journal of Power Sources
Goodbye, range anxiety? Electric vehicles may be more useful than previously thought
In the first study of its kind, scientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory quantitatively show that electric vehicles will meet the daily travel needs of drivers longer than commonly assumed. They found that batteries that have lost 20 percent of their originally rated energy storage capacity can still meet the daily travel needs of more than 85 percent of US drivers.

Contact: Julie Chao
JHChao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Mar-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Computer sims: In climatic tug of war, carbon released from thawing permafrost wins handily
There will be a lot more carbon released from thawing permafrost than the amount taken in by more Arctic vegetation, according to new computer simulations conducted by Berkeley Lab scientists.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Mar-2015
Nature
A better way of scrubbing CO2
Berkeley Lab researchers have discovered a means by which the removal of carbon dioxide (CO2) from coal-fired power plants might one day be done far more efficiently and at far lower costs than today. By appending a diamine molecule to the sponge-like solid materials known as metal-organic-frameworks (MOFs), the researchers were able to more than triple the CO2-scrubbing capacity of the MOFs, while significantly reducing parasitic energy.
US Department of Energy Office of Science ARPA-E

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Showing releases 1-25 out of 91.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

 

 

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