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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 104.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Copper on the brain at rest
A new study by Berkeley Lab researchers has shown that proper copper levels are essential to the health of the brain at rest.
National Institutes of Health and Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
PLOS ONE
For important tumor-suppressing protein, context is key
Berkeley Lab scientists have learned new details about how an important tumor-suppressing protein, called p53, binds to the human genome. As with many things in life, they found that context makes a big difference.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Nature Climate Change
As temperatures rise, soil will relinquish less carbon to the atmosphere than predicted
Current climate models probably overestimate the amount of carbon that will be released from soil into the atmosphere as global temperatures rise, according to research from Berkeley Lab.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 12-Nov-2014
Journal of Advances in Modeling Earth Systems
Latest supercomputers enable high-resolution climate models, truer simulation of extreme weather
Not long ago, it would have taken several years to run a high-resolution simulation on a global climate model. But using some of the most powerful supercomputers now available, Berkeley Lab scientist Michael Wehner was able to complete a run in just three months. What he found was that not only were the simulations much closer to actual observations, but the high-resolution models were far better at reproducing intense storms, such as hurricanes and cyclones.
Department of Energy

Contact: Julie Chao
JHChao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Nov-2014
Cell Cycle
Scientists develop new way to study how human cells become immortal, a crucial precursor to cancer
Berkeley Lab scientists have developed a new method that can easily create immortal human mammary epithelial cells. The cells could greatly facilitate the examination of cell immortalization as it actually occurs during cancer progression.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Nov-2014
Royal Society Interface
Synthetic biology for space exploration
Synthetic biology may hold the key to long-termed manned explorations of Mars and the Moon. Berkeley Lab researchers show that biomanufacturing based on microbes could to make travel to and settlement of extraterrestrial locations more practical and bearable.
NASA

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 5-Nov-2014
Nano Letters
Golden approach to high-speed DNA reading
Berkeley researchers have created the world's first graphene nanopores that feature integrated optical antennas. The antennas open the door to high-speed optical nanopore sequencing of DNA.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Nov-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
Outsmarting thermodynamics in self-assembly of nanostructures
Berkeley Lab researchers have achieved symmetry-breaking in a bulk metamaterial solution for the first time, a critical step game toward achieving new and exciting properties in metamaterials.
National Science Foundation, DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Rachel Berkowitz
rberkowitz@lbl.gov
510-486-7254
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Berkeley Lab scientists ID new driver behind Arctic warming
Scientists have identified a mechanism that could turn out to be a big contributor to warming in the Arctic region and melting sea ice. They found that open oceans are much less efficient than sea ice when it comes to emitting in the far-infrared region of the spectrum, a previously unknown phenomenon that is likely contributing to the warming of the polar climate.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Nov-2014
Environmental Science & Technology
Thirdhand smoke: Toxic airborne pollutants linger long after the smoke clears
Scientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have published a new study assessing the health effects of thirdhand smoke constituents present in indoor air. Looking at levels of more than 50 volatile organic compounds and airborne particles for 18 hours after smoking had taken place, they found that thirdhand smoke continues to have harmful health impacts for many hours after a cigarette has been extinguished.
University of California's Tobacco-Related Disease Research Program

Contact: Julie Chao
JHChao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Science
Lord of the microrings
Berkeley Lab researchers report a significant breakthrough in laser technology with the development of a unique microring laser cavity that can produce single-mode lasing on demand. This advance holds ramifications for a wide range of optoelectronic applications including metrology and interferometry, data storage and communications, and high-resolution spectroscopy.
Office of Naval Research

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Creating the coldest cubic meter in the universe
As part of an international collaboration, Berkeley Lab scientists have helped create the coldest cubic meter in the universe. The cooled chamber -- roughly the size of a vending machine -- was chilled to 6 milliKelvin or -273.144 degrees Celsius in preparation for a forthcoming experiment that will study neutrinos, ghostlike particles that could hold the key to the existence of matter around us.
DOE Office of Science

Contact: Kate Greene
kgreene@lbl.gov
510-486-4404
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
mBio
Boosting biogasoline production in microbes
Researchers with the Joint BioEnergy Institute have identified microbial genes that can improve both the tolerance and the production of biogasoline in engineered strains of E. coli.
U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Science
Berkeley Lab study reveals molecular structure of water at gold electrodes
Berkeley Lab researchers have recorded the first observations of the molecular structure of liquid water at a gold electrode under different battery charging conditions.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Rachel Berkowitz
rberkowitz@lbl.gov
510-486-7254
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Chemical Physical Letters
New insights on carbonic acid in water
A new study by Berkeley Lab researchers provides valuable new insight into aqueous carbonic acid with important implications for both geological and biological concerns.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Department of Energy's ESnet extends 100G connectivity across Atlantic
The Department of Energy's Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is deploying four new high-speed transatlantic links, giving researchers at America's national laboratories and universities ultra-fast access to scientific data from the Large Hadron Collider and other research sites in Europe. ESnet's transatlantic extension will deliver a total capacity of 340 gigabits-per-second, and serve dozens of scientific collaborations.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Jon Bashor
jbashor@lbl.gov
510-486-5849
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Journal of American Chemical Society
Dispelling a misconception about Mg-ion batteries
Berkeley Lab researchers, working under the JCESR Energy Hub, used supercomputer simulations to dispel a popular misconception about magnesium-ion batteries that should help advance the development of multivalent ion battery technology.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
A quick look at electron-boson coupling
Using an ultrafast spectroscopy technique called time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, Berkeley Lab researchers demonstrated a link between electron-boson coupling and high-temperature superconductivity in a high-Tc cuprate.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Oct-2014
Nature
RCas9: A programmable RNA editing tool
A powerful scientific tool for editing the DNA instructions in a genome can now also be applied to RNA as Berkeley Lab researchers have demonstrated a means by which the CRISPR/Cas9 protein complex can be programmed to recognize and cleave RNA at sequence-specific target sites.
National Institutes of Health, Center for RNA Systems Biology

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 2-Oct-2014
Physical Review C
A closer look at the perfect fluid
By combining data from two high-energy accelerators, nuclear scientists have refined the measurement of a remarkable property of exotic matter known as quark-gluon plasma. The findings reveal new aspects of the ultra-hot, 'perfect fluid' that give clues to the state of the young universe just microseconds after the big bang.
Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Kate Greene
kgreene@lbl.gov
510-486-4404
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Microbiome
MaxBin: Automated sorting through metagenomes
MaxBin is an automated software program for binning the genomes of individual microbial species from metagenomic sequences developed at the Joint BioEnergy Institute.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Astrophysical Journal
Simulations reveal an unusual death for ancient stars
Certain primordial stars -- those 55,000 and 56,000 times the mass of our sun, or solar masses -- may have died unusually. In death, these objects -- among the universe's first generation of stars -- would have exploded as supernovae and burned completely, leaving no remnant black hole behind.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Linda Vu
lvu@lbl.gov
510-495-2402
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
On the road to artificial photosynthesis
New experimental results from Berkeley Lab have revealed the critical influence of the electronic and geometric effects in the carbon dioxide reduction reaction.

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Sep-2014
Interactive map reveals rooftop reflectance for 5 California cities
Berkeley Lab scientists use aerial imagery to create an interactive map that displays the solar reflectance (also known as albedo) of individual roofs in Bakersfield, Long Beach, Los Angeles, San Francisco, and San Jose.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Sep-2014
Nature
Excitonic dark states shed light on TMDC atomic layers
Berkeley Lab researchers believe they have uncovered the secret behind the unusual optoelectronic properties of single atomic layers of TMDC materials, the two-dimensional semiconductors that hold great promise for nanoelectronic and photonic applications.

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Showing releases 1-25 out of 104.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

 

 

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