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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 26-49 out of 49.

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Public Release: 29-Apr-2014
NERSC, Cray, Intel to collaborate on next-generation supercomputer for science
The US Department of Energy's National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center and Cray Inc. announced today that they have signed a contract for a next generation of supercomputer to enable scientific discovery. This agreement is a significant step in advancing supercomputing design toward the kinds of computing systems we expect to see in the next decade as we advance to exascale.

Contact: Jon Bashor
bashor@lbl.gov
510-486-5849
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Apr-2014
Nature Scientific Reports
A glassy look for manganites
Researchers at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source discovered a glass-like re-ordering of electron-spin states as manganite crystals recovered from a photo-excited conductor state back to an insulator state. The discovery holds promise for future ultrafast electronic switching and memory devices.
US DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Nano Letters
First size-based chromatography technique for the study of living cells
Using nanodot technology, Berkeley Lab researchers demonstrated the first size-based form of chromatography for studying the membranes of living cells. This unique physical approach to probing cellular membrane structures reveals critical information that can't be obtained through conventional microscopy.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Berkeley Lab's Adam Arkin wins 2013 Lawrence Award
Adam Arkin, director of Berkeley Lab's Physical Biosciences Division, has been named one of six recipients of the 2013 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award by US Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Lynn Yarris
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 7-Apr-2014
2014 American Physical Society April Meeting
Astronomy & Astrophysics
BOSS quasars track the expanding universe -- most precise measurement yet
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory scientists and their colleagues have made novel measurements of the structure of the universe when it was only about 3 billion years old, using quasars collected by the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). Results include the most precise measurement of expansion since galaxies formed. BOSS, the largest component of the third Sloan Digital Sky Survey, pioneered the use of quasars to chart universal expansion and the role of dark energy.
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, SDSS-III Participating Institutions, National Science Foundation, DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Paul Preuss
paul_preuss@lbl.gov
415-272-3253
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
Nano Letters
To bridge LEDs' green gap, scientists think small... really small
Nanostructures half the breadth of a DNA strand could improve the efficiency of light emitting diodes, especially in the 'green gap,' simulations at the US Department of Energy's National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center have shown. Nanostructure LEDs made from indium nitride could lead to more natural-looking white lighting while avoiding some of the efficiency loss today's LEDs experience at high power.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Margie Wylie
mwylie@lbl.gov
510-486-7421
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 31-Mar-2014
Applied Energy
Hybrid vehicles more fuel efficient in India, China than in US
What makes cities in India and China so frustrating to drive in -- heavy traffic, aggressive driving style, few freeways -- makes them ideal for saving fuel with hybrid vehicles, according to new research by scientists at the US Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. In a pair of studies using real-world driving conditions, they found that hybrid cars are significantly more fuel-efficient in India and China than they are in the United States.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Julie Chao
jhchao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Mar-2014
Nature Communications
Resistance is not futile
Researchers with the Joint BioEnergy Institute have identified the genetic origins of a microbial resistance to ionic liquids and successfully introduced this resistance into a strain of E. coli bacteria for the production of advanced biofuels.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Mar-2014
Nature Methods
New technique for identifying gene-enhancers
Berkeley Lab researchers led the development of a new technique for identifying gene enhancers -- sequences of DNA that act to amplify the expression of a specific gene -- in the genomes of humans and other mammals. Called SIF-seq, this new technique complements existing genomic tools, such as ChIP-seq, and offers additional benefits.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Mar-2014
Nature Communications
New semiconductor holds promise for 2-D physics and electronics
Researchers at Berkeley Lab's Molecular Foundry have discovered a unique new semiconductor, rhenium disulfide, that behaves electronically as if it were a 2-D monolayer even as a 3-D bulk material. This not only opens the door to 2-D electronic applications with a 3D material, it also makes it possible to study 2-D physics with easy-to-make 3-D crystals.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Mar-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
Bright future for protein nanoprobes
Berkeley Lab researchers at the Molecular Foundry have discovered surprising new rules for creating ultra-bright light-emitting crystals that are less than 10 nanometers in diameter. These ultra-tiny but ultra-bright nanoprobes should be a big asset for biological imaging, especially deep-tissue optical imaging of neurons in the brain.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Mar-2014
Nature
Vast gene-expression map yields neurological and environmental stress insights
A consortium led by Berkeley Lab scientists has conducted the largest survey yet of how information encoded in an animal genome is processed in different organs, stages of development, and environmental conditions. Their findings, based on fruit fly research, paint a new picture of how genes function in the nervous system and in response to environmental stress.
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 7-Mar-2014
Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics
Promising news for solar fuels from Berkeley Lab researchers at JCAP
A JCAP study shows that nearly 90 percent of the electrons generated by a semiconductor/cobaloxime hybrid catalyst designed to store solar energy in hydrogen are being stored in their intended target molecules.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Mar-2014
Biomaterials
First look at how Staphylococcus cells adhere to nanostructures could help fight infections
A team of researchers led by Berkeley Lab scientists have explored, for the first time, how individual Staphylococcus cells glom onto metallic nanostructures of various shapes and sizes that are not much bigger than the cells themselves. Their work could lead to a more nuanced understanding of what makes a surface less inviting to bacteria.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Mar-2014
Nature Chemistry
Every step you take
The first direct, temporally resolved observations of intermediate steps in water oxidation using cobalt oxide, an Earth-abundant solid catalyst, revealed kinetic bottlenecks whose elimination would help boost the efficiency of artificial photosynthesis systems.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Mar-2014
Monthly Notices of Royal Astronomical Society
Standard-candle supernovae are still standard, but why?
Scientists believed that Type Ia supernovae, the best cosmological standard candles, are similar in brightness because they suffer thermonuclear explosions when the white dwarf stars that are their progenitors reach 1.4 solar masses, the Chandrasekhar mass. Now the Nearby Supernova Factory based at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has shown that white dwarfs exploding as Type Ia supernovae have a range of masses. Their light-curve widths are directly proportional to the mass involved in the explosion.
DOE/Office of Science, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Centre national de la recherche scientifique

Contact: Paul Preuss
paul_preuss@lbl.gov
415-272-3253
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 27-Feb-2014
Science
Big step for next-generation fuel cells and electrolyzers
Researchers at Berkeley and Argonne National Labs have discovered a highly promising new class of nanocatalysts for fuel cells and water-alkali electrolyzers that are an order of magnitude higher in activity than the target set by DOE for 2017.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Feb-2014
Nature Communications
On the road to Mottronics
At Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source, researchers controlled the conducting/insulating phases of ultra-thin films of Mott materials by applying an epitaxial strain to the crystal lattice. This is an important step on the road to Mottronics.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Feb-2014
Journal of American Chemical Society
Tracking catalytic reactions in microreactors
Berkeley Lab researchers have demonstrated a technique that for the first time allows the catalytic reactivity inside a microreactor to be mapped in high resolution from start to finish. This technique opens a more effective and efficient synthesis of pharmaceutical drugs and other flow reactor chemical products.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
Berkeley Lab researchers at AAAS 2014
Can more accurate climate models help us understand extreme weather events? Can we use synthetic biology to create better biofuels? These questions, and the ongoing search for Dark Matter and better photovoltaic materials, are just some of the presentations by Lawrence Berkeley National Lab researchers at this year's AAAS meeting.

Contact: Jon Weiner
jrweiner@lbl.gov
510-326-2092
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Feb-2014
Science
New insight into an emerging genome-editing tool
A collaboration led by Berkeley Lab's Jennifer Doudna and Eva Nogales has produced the first detailed look at the 3D structure of the Cas9 enzyme and how it partners with guide RNA to interact with target DNA. The results should enhance Cas9's value and versatility as a genome-editing tool.
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, National Science Foundation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 5-Feb-2014
Nature Materials
Crossover sound
The first "unambiguous demonstration" of the atomic-scale sound waves known as phonons crossing over from particle-like to wave-like behavior in superlattices opens the door to improved thermoelectrics and possibly even phonon lasers.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Feb-2014
NERSC Users Group Meeting 2014
NERSC announces second annual HPC Achievement Awards
The US Department of Energy's National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) announced the recipients of its second annual High Performance Computing (HPC) Achievement Awards on Feb. 4, 2014, during the annual NERSC User Group meeting at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab). The awards recognize innovative uses of HPC to solve scientific problems or exceptional impact on scientific understanding or society. To encourage younger scientists, NERSC also presented two early career awards.
US Deptartment of Energy's Office of Science

Contact: Jon Bashor
jbashor@lbl.gov
510-486-5849
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Feb-2014
Molecular Cell
How a shape-shifting DNA-repair machine fights cancer
Maybe you've seen the movies or played with toy Transformers, those shape-shifting machines that morph in response to whatever challenge they face. It turns out that DNA-repair machines in your cells use a similar approach to fight cancer and other diseases, according to new research led by Berkeley Lab scientists.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-484-5956
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Showing releases 26-49 out of 49.

<< < 1 | 2

 

 

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