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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 26-49 out of 49.

<< < 1 | 2

Public Release: 25-Jun-2014
Physical Review Letters
Advanced light source provides new look at skyrmions
At Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source, researchers for the first time have used x-rays to observe and study skyrmions, subatomic quasiparticles that could play a key role in future spintronic technologies.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Jun-2014
Plant Journal
The JBEI GT Collection: A new resource for advanced biofuels research
The JBEI GT Collection, the first glycosyltransferase clone collection specifically targeted for the study of plant cell wall biosynthesis, is expected to drive basic scientific understanding of GTs and better enable the manipulation of cell walls for the production of biofuels and other chemical products.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Dynamic spectroscopy duo
Berkeley Lab researchers have developed a new technique called two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy that can be used to study the interplay between electrons and atomic nuclei during a photochemical reaction. Photochemical reactions are critical to a wide range of natural and technological phenomena, including photosynthesis, vision, nanomaterials and solar energy.
US Department of Energy Office of Science, National Science Foundation

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Jun-2014
Nature Communications
Manipulating and detecting ultrahigh frequency sound waves
Berkeley Lab researchers have demonstrated a technique for detecting and controlling ultrahigh frequency sound waves at the nanometer scale. This represents an advance towards next generation ultrasonic imaging with potentially 1,000 times higher resolution than today's medical ultrasounds.
US Department of Energy's Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Jun-2014
Nature Communications
Berkeley Lab researchers create nanoparticle thin films that self-assemble in 1 minute
Berkeley Lab researchers have devised a technique whereby self-assembling nanoparticle arrays can form a highly ordered thin film over macroscopic distances in one minute.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Jun-2014
Nano Letters
Evolution of a bimetallic nanocatalyst
Atomic-scale snapshots of a bimetallic nanoparticle catalyst in action have provided insights that could help improve the industrial process by which fuels and chemicals are synthesized from natural gas, coal or plant biomass.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 5-Jun-2014
Cell Reports
New clues to why older women are more vulnerable to breast cancer
Berkeley Lab scientists have gained more insights into why older women are more susceptible to breast cancer. They found that as women age, the cells responsible for maintaining healthy breast tissue stop responding to their immediate surroundings, including mechanical cues that should prompt them to suppress nearby tumors.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Jun-2014
Nature
Surprisingly strong magnetic fields challenge black holes' pull
A new study of supermassive black holes at the centers of galaxies has found magnetic fields play an impressive role in the systems' dynamics. In fact, in dozens of black holes surveyed, the magnetic field strength matched the force produced by the black holes' powerful gravitational pull.
NASA

Contact: Kate Greene
kgreene@lbl.gov
510-486-4404
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Jun-2014
ACS Nano
2-D transistors promise a faster electronics future
Berkeley Lab researchers have unveiled the world's first fully two-dimensional field-effect transistor, using new device architecture that provides high electron mobility even under high voltages and scaled to a monolayer in thickness.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-May-2014
Science
Unexpected water explains surface chemistry of nanocrystals
Berkeley Lab researchers have found unexpected traces of water in semiconducting nanocrystals that helps answer long-standing questions about their surface chemistry.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Rachel Berkowitz
rberkowitz@lbl.gov
510-486-7254
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 28-May-2014
Physics of Plasmas
A path toward more powerful tabletop accelerators
Making a tabletop particle accelerator just got easier. A new study shows that certain requirements for the lasers used in an emerging type of small-area particle accelerator can be significantly relaxed. Researchers hope the finding could bring about a new era of accelerators that would need just a few meters to bring particles to great speeds, rather than the many kilometers required of traditional accelerators.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Kate Greene
kgreene@lbl.gov
510-486-4404
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-May-2014
Cell
New details on microtubules and how the anti-cancer drug Taxol works
Berkeley Lab researchers have produced images of microtubule assembly and disassembly at the unprecedented resolution of 5 angstroms, providing new insight into the success of the anti-cancer drug Taxol and pointing the way to possible improvements.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-May-2014
Nature
Confirmed: Stellar behemoth self-destructs in a Type IIb supernova
For the first time, astronomers have direct confirmation that a Wolf-Rayet star -- sitting 360 million light years away -- died in a violent explosion known as a Type IIb supernova. Using the iPTF pipeline, researchers caught supernova SN 2013cu within hours of its explosion.

Contact: Linda Vu
lvu@lbl.gov
510-495-2402
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-May-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
Lighting the way to graphene-based devices
Berkeley Lab researchers have demonstrated a technique whereby semiconductors made from graphene and boron nitride can be charge-doped to alter their electronic properties using only visible light.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 12-May-2014
Cell
All in the rotation
Berkeley Lab researchers have shed new light on a type of molecular motor used to package the DNA of a number of viruses, including herpes and the adenoviruses. Their findings could help in the development of more effective drugs and inspire the design of new and improved synthetic biomotors.
National Institutes of Health, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 7-May-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Berkeley Lab develops nanoscope to probe chemistry on the molecular scale
By combining atomic force microscopy with infrared synchrotron light, researchers from Berkeley Lab and the University of Colorado have improved the spatial resolution of infrared spectroscopy by orders of magnitude, while simultaneously covering its full spectroscopic range, enabling the investigation of variety of nanoscale, mesoscale, and surface phenomena that were previously difficult to study.
Department of Energy

Contact: Kate Greene
kgreene@lbl.gov
510-486-4404
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 2-May-2014
Journal of the American Chemical Society
Probing dopant distribution
Berkeley Lab researchers at the Molecular Foundry have shown that when doping a semiconductor to alter its electrical properties, equally important as the amount of dopant is how the dopant is distributed on the surface and throughout the material.
US Department of Energy's Office of Science

Contact: Rachel Berkowitz
rberkowitz@lbl.gov
510-486-7254
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 1-May-2014
Science
Edgy look at 2-D molybdenum disulfide
Berkeley Lab researchers have recorded the first observations of a strong nonlinear optical resonance along the edges of single layers of molybdenum disulfide that could be key to the use of this and similar 2-D semiconductors in future nanoelectronic devices
US Department of Energy's Office of Science, US Air Force

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Apr-2014
NERSC, Cray, Intel to collaborate on next-generation supercomputer for science
The US Department of Energy's National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center and Cray Inc. announced today that they have signed a contract for a next generation of supercomputer to enable scientific discovery. This agreement is a significant step in advancing supercomputing design toward the kinds of computing systems we expect to see in the next decade as we advance to exascale.

Contact: Jon Bashor
bashor@lbl.gov
510-486-5849
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Apr-2014
Nature Scientific Reports
A glassy look for manganites
Researchers at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source discovered a glass-like re-ordering of electron-spin states as manganite crystals recovered from a photo-excited conductor state back to an insulator state. The discovery holds promise for future ultrafast electronic switching and memory devices.
US DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Nano Letters
First size-based chromatography technique for the study of living cells
Using nanodot technology, Berkeley Lab researchers demonstrated the first size-based form of chromatography for studying the membranes of living cells. This unique physical approach to probing cellular membrane structures reveals critical information that can't be obtained through conventional microscopy.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Berkeley Lab's Adam Arkin wins 2013 Lawrence Award
Adam Arkin, director of Berkeley Lab's Physical Biosciences Division, has been named one of six recipients of the 2013 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award by US Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Lynn Yarris
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 7-Apr-2014
2014 American Physical Society April Meeting
Astronomy & Astrophysics
BOSS quasars track the expanding universe -- most precise measurement yet
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory scientists and their colleagues have made novel measurements of the structure of the universe when it was only about 3 billion years old, using quasars collected by the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). Results include the most precise measurement of expansion since galaxies formed. BOSS, the largest component of the third Sloan Digital Sky Survey, pioneered the use of quasars to chart universal expansion and the role of dark energy.
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, SDSS-III Participating Institutions, National Science Foundation, DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Paul Preuss
paul_preuss@lbl.gov
415-272-3253
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Apr-2014
Nano Letters
To bridge LEDs' green gap, scientists think small... really small
Nanostructures half the breadth of a DNA strand could improve the efficiency of light emitting diodes, especially in the 'green gap,' simulations at the US Department of Energy's National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center have shown. Nanostructure LEDs made from indium nitride could lead to more natural-looking white lighting while avoiding some of the efficiency loss today's LEDs experience at high power.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Margie Wylie
mwylie@lbl.gov
510-486-7421
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Showing releases 26-49 out of 49.

<< < 1 | 2

 

 

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