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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 26-50 out of 91.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

Public Release: 10-Mar-2015
Scientific Reports
New clues about the risk of cancer from low-dose radiation
Berkeley Lab scientists studied mice and found their risk of mammary cancer from low-dose radiation depends a great deal on their genetic makeup. They also learned key details about how genes and the cells immediately surrounding a tumor (also called the tumor microenvironment) affect cancer risk.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Mar-2015
Proteomics
Biofuel proteomics
JBEI researchers used advanced proteomic techniques to identify 1,750 unique proteins in shoots of switchgrass, a native prairie grass viewed as one of the most promising of all the plants that could be used to produce advanced biofuels.

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Mar-2015
eLife
Metabolic path to improved biofuel production
Researchers at the Energy Biosciences Institute have found a way to increase the production of fuels and other chemicals from biomass fermented by yeast without the need of environmentally harsh pre-treatments or expensive enzyme cocktails.
Energy Biosciences Institute

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Mar-2015
Geology
A new level of earthquake understanding
Working at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source, researchers studied quartz from the San Andreas Fault at the microscopic scale, the scale at which earthquake-triggering stresses originate. The results could one day lead to a better understanding of earthquake events.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 2-Mar-2015
Nature
Unlocking the key to immunological memory in bacteria
A powerful genome editing tool may soon become even more powerful. Berkeley Lab researchers have unlocked the key to how bacteria are able to 'steal' genetic information from viruses and other foreign invaders for use in their own immunological memory system.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 27-Feb-2015
Nature Communications
First detailed microscopy evidence of bacteria at the lower size limit of life
Scientists have captured the first detailed microscopy images of ultra-small bacteria that are believed to be about as small as life can get. The research was led by scientists from Berkeley Lab and the University of California, Berkeley. The existence of ultra-small bacteria has been debated for two decades, but there hasn't been a comprehensive electron microscopy and DNA-based description of the microbes until now.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Feb-2015
Nature
First direct observation of carbon dioxide's increasing greenhouse effect at the Earth's surface
Scientists have observed an increase in carbon dioxide's greenhouse effect at the Earth's surface for the first time. The researchers, led by scientists from the US Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, measured atmospheric carbon dioxide's increasing capacity to absorb thermal radiation emitted from the Earth's surface over an eleven-year period at two locations in North America. They attributed this upward trend to rising carbon dioxide levels from fossil fuel emissions.
Department of Energy's Office of Science

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Feb-2015
2015 AAAS Annual Meeting
Berkeley Lab researchers at AAAS
Can more accurate climate models help us understand extreme weather events? What can we expect with the upcoming restart of the Large Hadron Collider and what does the future of accelerators look like? These questions, and the ongoing search for a better battery, are just some of the many presentations by Berkeley Lab researchers at this year's AAAS meeting. And don't forget to stop by our booth (#406) in the Exhibit Hall this week.

Contact: Jon Weiner
jrweiner@lbl.gov
510-486-4014
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Feb-2015
ACS Nano
Bacterial armor holds clues for self-assembling nanostructures
Berkeley Lab researchers at the Molecular Foundry have uncovered key details in the process by which bacterial proteins self-assemble into a protective coating, like chainmail armor. This process can be a model for the self-assembly of 2-D and 3-D nanostructures.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Feb-2015
Nature Materials
New design tool for metamaterials
Berkeley Lab researchers have shown that it is possible to predict the nonlinear optical properties of metamaterials using a recent theory for nonlinear light scattering when light passes through nanostructures.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 5-Feb-2015
Nano Letters
Precision growth of light-emitting nanowires
A novel approach to growing nanowires promises a new means of control over their light-emitting and electronic properties. Berkeley Lab researchers demonstrated a new growth technique that uses specially engineered catalysts. These catalysts have given scientists more options than ever in turning the color of light-emitting nanowires.
US Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences

Contact: Kate Greene
kgreene@lbl.gov
510-486-4404
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Rediscovering spontaneous light emission
LEDs could replace lasers for short-range optical communications with the use of an optical antenna that enhances the spontaneous emission of light from atoms, molecules and semiconductor quantum dots.
NSF/Center for Energy Efficient Electronics Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
Science
New pathway to valleytronics
Berkeley Lab researchers have uncovered a promising new pathway to valleytronics, a potential quantum computing technology in which information is coded based on the wavelike motion of electrons moving through certain 2-D semiconductors.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Jan-2015
Energy Policy
California's policies can significantly cut greenhouse gas emissions through 2030
A new model of the impact of California's existing and proposed policies on its greenhouse gas reduction goals suggests that the state is on track to meet 2020 goals, and could achieve greater emission reductions by 2030, but the state will need to do more to reach its 2050 climate goals.
California Air Resources Board

Contact: Julie Chao
jhchao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Jan-2015
Nature Communications
Solving an organic semiconductor mystery
Berkeley Lab researchers have uncovered the mysterious source of performance issues in organic semiconductors -- nanocrystallites cluttering domain interfaces!
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 12-Jan-2015
Nature Nanotechnology
From the bottom up: Manipulating nanoribbons at the molecular level
Researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California, Berkeley, have developed a new precision approach for synthesizing graphene nanoribbons from pre-designed molecular building blocks. Using this process the researchers have built nanoribbons that have enhanced properties -- such as position-dependent, tunable bandgaps -- that are potentially very useful for next-generation electronic circuitry.
US Department of Energy Office of Science, National Science Foundation

Contact: Rachel Berkowitz
rberkowitz@lbl.gov
510-486-7254
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Dec-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
Piezoelectricity in a 2-D semiconductor
Berkeley Lab researchers have opened the door to low-power off/on switches in micro-electro-mechanical systems, MEMS, and nanoelectronic devices, as well as ultrasensitive bio-sensors, with the first observation of piezoelectricity in a free standing two-dimensional semiconductor.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 19-Dec-2014
Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics
Making a good thing better
Berkeley Lab researchers carried out the first X-ray absorption spectroscopy study of a model electrolyte for lithium-ion batteries and may have found a pathway forward to improving LIBs for electric vehicles and large-scale electrical energy storage.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Dec-2014
Nature
Switching to spintronics
Berkeley Lab researchers used an electric field to reverse the magnetization direction in a multiferroic spintronic device at room temperature, a demonstration that points a new way towards spintronics and smaller, faster and cheaper ways of storing and processing data.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Back to future with Roman architectural concrete
A key discovery to understanding Roman architectural concrete that has stood the test of time and the elements for nearly two thousand years has been made by researchers using beams of X-rays at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source.

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
Physical Review Letters
World record for compact particle accelerator
Using one of the most powerful lasers in the world, Berkeley Lab researchers have accelerated subatomic particles to the highest energies ever recorded. They used an emerging class of compact particle accelerator that physicists believe can shrink traditional, miles-long accelerators to machines that can fit on a table.
US Department of Energy office of High Energy Physics

Contact: Kate Greene
kgreene@lbl.gov
510-486-4404
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 5-Dec-2014
2014 AGU Fall Meeting
New journal serves as an interface of statistics, atmospheric and ocean sciences
A new journal -- Advances in Statistical Climatology, Meteorology and Oceanography -- gives statisticians and researchers specializing in the atmospheric and ocean sciences an outlet to publish the details of their statistical and mathematical developments, which will effectively lead to improved models and methods for these fields.

Contact: Jennifer Hoeting
jah@ram.colostate.edu
970-491-2897
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 2-Dec-2014
Nature Communications
A better look at the chemistry of interfaces
SWAPPS -- Standing Wave Ambient Pressure Photoelectron Spectroscopy -- is a new X-ray technique developed at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source that provides sub-nanometer resolution of every chemical element to be found at heterogeneous interfaces, such as those in batteries, fuel cells and other devices.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 1-Dec-2014
Metabolic Engineering
Sweet smell of success
JBEI researchers have engineered E. coli bacteria to convert glucose into significant quantities of methyl ketones, a class of chemical compounds primarily used for fragrances and flavors, but highly promising as clean, green and renewable blending agents for diesel fuel.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Copper on the brain at rest
A new study by Berkeley Lab researchers has shown that proper copper levels are essential to the health of the brain at rest.
National Institutes of Health and Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Showing releases 26-50 out of 91.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

 

 

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