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DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-20 out of 20.

Public Release: 21-Apr-2016
Physical Review D
Numerical simulations shed new light on early universe
Innovative multidisciplinary research in nuclear and particle physics and cosmology has led to the development of a new, more accurate computer code to study the early universe. The code simulates conditions during the first few minutes of cosmological evolution to model the role of neutrinos, nuclei and other particles in shaping the early universe.
National Science Foundation at University of California San Diego, Laboratory Directed Research and Development program through the Center for Space and Earth Sciences

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Apr-2016
Physical Review D
Numerical simulations shed new light on early universe
Innovative multidisciplinary research in nuclear and particle physics and cosmology has led to the development of a new, more accurate computer code to study the early universe.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Mar-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Holistic data analysis and modeling poised to transform protein X-ray crystallography
A new 3-D modeling and data-extraction technique is about to transform the field of X-ray crystallography, with potential benefits for both the pharmaceutical industry and structural biology. A paper this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences describes the improved blending of experimentation and computer modeling, extracting valuable information from diffuse, previously discarded data.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Mar-2016
Small businesses win technical support to develop clean energy technologies
Four small businesses will be working with Los Alamos National Laboratory to accelerate the nation's transformation toward a clean energy economy as part of the Department of Energy's Small Business Vouchers (SBV) pilot project. These businesses will gain access to world-class laboratory resources to help move innovative ideas and technologies closer to the marketplace.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Laura Mullane
mullane@lanl.gov
505-667-6012
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Mar-2016
Nature Geoscience
Nature study reveals rapid ice-wedge loss across Arctic
Permafrost covers a considerable part of the Arctic; it's been thawing in recent decades, releasing greenhouse gases. New research reveals that similarly ancient ice wedges that form the prevalent honeycomb pattern across the tundra appear to be melting rapidly across the Arctic.
DOE Office of Science

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 1-Mar-2016
Argonne and Los Alamos National Laboratories develop more affordable fuel cell components
Researchers at the US Department of Energy's Argonne and Los Alamos national laboratories have teamed up to support a DOE initiative through the creation of the Electrocatalysis Consortium, a collaboration devoted to finding an effective but cheaper alternative to platinum in hydrogen fuel cells.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Feb-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Analyzing genetic tree sheds new light on disease outbreaks
Scientists have a new tool for unraveling the mysteries of how diseases such as HIV move through a population, thanks to insights into phylogenetics, the creation of an organism's genetic tree and evolutionary relationships.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Feb-2016
Journal of Geophysical Research - Space Physics
Study finds surprising variability in shape of Van Allen Belts
The shape of the two electron swarms 600 miles to more than 25,000 miles from the Earth's surface, known as the Van Allen Belts, could be quite different than has been believed for decades, according to a new study of data from NASA's Van Allen Probes that was released Friday in the Journal of Geophysical Research.

Contact: Laura Mullane
mullane@lanl.gov
505-667-6012
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Feb-2016
Nature
Fossil analysis pushes back human split from other primates by 2 million years
A paper in the latest issue of the journal Nature suggests a common ancestor of apes and humans, Chororapithecus abyssinicus, evolved in Africa, not Eurasia, two million years earlier than previously thought.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Feb-2016
Gravitational waves found, black-hole models led the way
Gravitational waves were predicted by Einstein's theory of general relativity in 1916, and now, almost exactly 100 years later, the faint ripples across space-time have been found. The advanced Laser Interferometric Gravitational-wave Observatory (aLIGO) has achieved the first direct measurement.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Dec-2015
New Mars rover findings revealed at American Geophysical Union Conference
New findings by NASA's Mars Curiosity rover are the focus of a press conference this morning at the American Geophysical Union meeting.

Contact: Luara Mullane
mullane@lanl.gov
505-667-6012
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Dec-2015
Scientific Reports
New model more accurately tracks gases for underground nuclear explosion detection
Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed a new, more thorough method for detecting underground nuclear explosions (UNEs) by coupling two fundamental elements -- seismic models with gas-flow models--to create a more complete picture of how an explosion's evidence (radionuclide gases) seep to the surface. Their findings will appear in today's edition of the journal Nature's Scientific Reports in a paper titled, 'Radionuclide Gas Transport through Nuclear Explosion-Generated Fracture Networks.'

Contact: Luara Mullane
mullane@lanl.gov
505-667-6012
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Dec-2015
Portable MRI named Top 10 Breakthrough of 2015 by Physics World magazine
Los Alamos National Laboratory's portable MRI was named one of the Top 10 Breakthroughs of the Year by Physics World, the member magazine of the Institute of Physics. Portable MRI, also called Battlefield MRI (bMRI), uses ultra-low-field magnetic resonance imaging to create images of injured soft tissues, such as the brain.

Contact: Luara Mullane
mullane@lanl.gov
505-667-6012
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Sep-2015
Nature Plants
Large trees -- key climate influencers -- die first in drought
In forests worldwide, drought consistently has had a more detrimental impact on the growth and survival of larger trees, new research shows. In addition, while the death of small trees may affect the dominance of trees in a landscape, the death of large trees has a far worse impact on the ecosystem and climate's health, especially due to the important role that trees play in the carbon cycle.
DOE/Office of Science, Smithsonian Competitive Grants Program for Science, Laboratory Directed Research and Development

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Sep-2015
Journal of the American Chemical Society
Los Alamos explores hybrid ultrasmall gold nanocluster for enzymatic fuel cells
With fossil-fuel sources dwindling, better biofuel cell design is a strong candidate in the energy field. In research published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, Los Alamos researchers and external collaborators synthesized and characterized a new DNA-templated gold nanocluster (AuNC) that could resolve a critical methodological barrier for efficient biofuel cell design.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Aug-2015
Science
Young, Jupiter-like planet discovered
A team of researchers has discovered a Jupiter-like planet within a young system that could provide a new understanding of how planets formed around our sun.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Jul-2015
Nature Geoscience
Curiosity rover finds evidence of Mars' primitive continental crust
The ChemCam laser instrument on NASA's Curiosity rover has turned its beam onto some unusually light-colored rocks on Mars, and the results are surprisingly similar to Earth's granitic continental crust rocks. This is the first discovery of a potential 'continental crust' on Mars.
NASA

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Jun-2015
Journal of Physical Oceanography
Analyzing ocean mixing reveals insight on climate
Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed a computer model that clarifies the complex processes driving ocean mixing in the vast eddies that swirl across hundreds of miles of open ocean.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-May-2015
Nature
Uncovering the mysteries of cosmic explosions
An automated software system developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory played a key role in the discovery of supernova iPTF 14atg and could provide insight, a virtual Rosetta stone, into future supernovae and their underlying physics.
Laboratory Directed Research and Development

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 19-May-2015
Nature Climate Change
Drought-induced tree mortality accelerating in forests
Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory have found that drought and heat-induced tree mortality is accelerating in many forest biomes as a consequence of a warming climate in their paper 'Darcy's law predicts widespread forest mortality under climate warming,' published in the journal Nature Climate Change.

Contact: Nick Njegomir
njegomir@lanl.gov
505-665-9394
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Showing releases 1-20 out of 20.

 

 

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