U.S.Department of Energy Research News
Text-Only | Privacy Policy | Site Map  
Search Releases and Features  
Biological SciencesComputational SciencesEnergy SciencesEnvironmental SciencesPhysical SciencesEngineering and TechnologyNational Security Science

Home
Labs
Multimedia Resources
News Releases
Feature Stories
Library
Contacts
RSS Feed



US Department of Energy National Science Bowl


Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 43.

1 | 2 > >>

Public Release: 21-Apr-2016
Nature Communications
Cleaning up hybrid battery electrodes improves capacity and lifespan
Hybrid batteries that charge faster than conventional ones could have significantly better electrical capacity and long-term stability when prepared with a gentle-sounding way of making electrodes. Called ion soft-landing, the high-precision technique resulted in electrodes that could store a third more energy and had twice the lifespan compared to those prepared by a conventional method, the researchers report in Nature Communications.
Department of Energy

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Apr-2016
Nature Energy
Unexpected discovery leads to a better battery
An unexpected discovery has led to a zinc-manganese oxide rechargeable battery that's as inexpensive as conventional car batteries, but has a much higher energy density.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Franny White
franny.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Apr-2016
Powerful mass spectrometer opens new vistas for scientists
Scientists now have access to a powerful new resource to help them address pressing science challenges related to the environment, biology and energy. The new 21 Tesla Ultra-High-Resolution Mass Spectrometer, or the 21T for short, allows scientists to analyze and separate atoms and molecules according to their size and molecular structure with a clarity and precision well beyond conventional mass spectrometers.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 7-Apr-2016
Nature Communications
Microbes take center stage in workings of 'the river's liver'
Scientists have found evidence that rising river waters deliver a feast of carbon to hungry microbes where water meets land, triggering increased activity and altering the flow of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Apr-2016
Angewandte Chemie International Edition
Plastic proteins: Synthetic material mimics essential characteristics of natural proteins
PNNL researchers hoping to design new materials for energy uses have developed a system to make synthetic polymers -- some would say plastics -- with the versatility of nature's own polymers, the ubiquitous proteins. Based on an inexpensive industrial chemical, these synthetic polymers might one day be used to create materials with functions as limitless as proteins, which are involved in every facet of life.
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 1-Apr-2016
Nature Communications
Low-cost and lightweight
For the first time, researchers have been able to see what makes this titanium alloy so strong -- and then make it stronger.
US Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Office -- Propulsion Materials Program

Contact: Susan Bauer
susan.bauer@mac.com
509-372-6083
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Mar-2016
PLOS ONE
Microbes may not be so adaptable to climate change
Microbes in soil -- organisms that exert enormous influence over our planet's carbon cycle -- may not be as adaptable to climate change as most scientists have presumed.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Mar-2016
PNNL gives a helping hand to small green businesses
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory will help three small businesses reduce the cost of hydropower, cut building energy use, and make adhesives from plants through new projects announced today by DOE's Small Business Vouchers program.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Franny White
franny.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Mar-2016
Advanced Materials
Mix and match MOF
Inexpensive materials called MOFs pull gases out of air or other mixed gas streams, but fail to do so with oxygen. Now, a team has overcome this limitation by creating a composite of a MOF and a helper molecule in which the two work in concert to separate oxygen from other gases simply and cheaply, they report in Advanced Materials.
Department of Energy

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Mar-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Cloudy problems: Today's clouds might not be the same as pre-industrial ones
Clouds are notoriously hard to simulate in computer programs that model climate. A new study in the Proceedings on the National Academy of Sciences Early Edition suggests why -- either clouds are more variable than scientists give them credit for, or those bright white clouds in the sky are much dirtier than scientists thought.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 2-Mar-2016
The world's newest atom-smasher achieves its 'first turns'
One of the world's top particle accelerators has reached a milestone, achieving its 'first turns' -- circulating beams of particles for the first time. Japan's SuperKEKB accelerator is at the forefront of the 'intensity frontier' and is designed to deliver more than 40 times the rate of collisions between particles than its predecessor. Scientists at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have led the US contribution to the main experiment, with 75 US scientists from 14 institutions contributing.

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Feb-2016
Science
Biofuel tech straight from the farm
Nature's figured it out already, how to best break down food into fuel. Now scientists have caught up, showing that fungi found in the guts of goats, horses and sheep could help fill up your gas tank too.
US Department of Energy Office of Science, US Department of Agriculture, Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies

Contact: Eric Francavilla
eric.francavilla@pnnl.gov
509-372-4066
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Jan-2016
PNNL moves cybersecurity software and a novel disinfecting system beyond the lab
Software that helps cybersecurity analysts prevent hacks and a microbial disinfecting system that kills with an activated salt spray are two of the latest innovations Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has successfully commercialized with the help of business partners. The Federal Laboratory Consortium has honored the two teams with 2016 Excellence in Technology Transfer awards.
Department of Energy

Contact: Eric Francavilla
eric.francavilla@pnnl.gov
509-372-4066
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Jan-2016
Realistic data needed to evolve the 21st century power grid
PNNL is helping to create open-access power grid datasets for use in testing new grid technologies.
DOE/Advanced Research Projects Agency -- Energy

Contact: Susan Bauer
susan.bauer@pnnl.gov
509-372-6083
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Jan-2016
ACS Chemical Biology
Microbes take their vitamins -- for the good of science
Scientists have made a 'vitamin mimic' -- a molecule that looks and acts just like a natural vitamin to bacteria -- that offers a new window into the inner workings of living microbes.
U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Jan-2016
Nature Communications
How seashells get their strength
Seashells and lobster claws are hard to break, but chalk is soft enough to draw on sidewalks. Though all three are made of calcium carbonate crystals, the hard materials include clumps of soft biological matter that make them much stronger. A study today in Nature Communications reveals how soft clumps get into crystals and endow them with remarkable strength.
US Department of Energy, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Dec-2015
Advanced Energy Materials
New flow battery offers lower-cost energy storage
Renewable energy can be stored for less with PNNL's new organic aqueous flow battery, which uses inexpensive and readily available materials. The new battery is expected to cost about 60 percent less than today's standard flow batteries.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Franny White
franny.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Dec-2015
Six PNNL scientists among select group of highly cited authors
Six scientists at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are included in a new analysis of scientists whose work is cited most often by their peers. Their research is in disciplines where PNNL is highly regarded internationally -- climate science, energy storage, materials science, and chemistry.

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Dec-2015
Enlisting distributed energy devices to balance the power grid
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and its partners are developing a unique way to balance the increasingly complex power grid: an incentive-based coordination and control system for distributed energy devices such as rooftop solar panels, batteries and electric vehicles.
DOE/Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy

Contact: Franny White
frances.white@battelle.org
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Dec-2015
2015 AGU Fall Meeting
PNNL talks weather phenomena at AGU
PNNL researchers explored the forces that stall the weather event known as the Madden-Julian Oscillation as it crosses the islands of the Maritime Continent.
Department of Energy

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Nov-2015
Science
Can Paris pledges avert severe climate change?
A study published in Science today shows that if the emission reductions pledges brought to Paris are implemented and followed by measures of equal or greater ambition, they have the potential to reduce the probability of the highest levels of warming, and increase the probability of limiting global warming to 2 degrees Celsius.
Global Technology Strategy Program, William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, US Department of State, US Environmental Protection Agency

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Nov-2015
Three new technologies to make energy cleaner, more efficient
PNNL and its partners are developing three new technologies to improve the power grid, make biofuel from seaweed and produce hydrogen with grants from DOE's Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy, or ARPA-E.
US Department of Energy's Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy

Contact: Franny White
franny.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Nov-2015
Climate-friendly rice recognized as a top science development of 2015
The creation of a new kind of rice which gives off nearly zero greenhouse gas emissions during its growth has earned kudos for a team of scientists from three continents, including the lead investigator at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The new kind of rice grows in a manner that nearly eliminates the production of methane, a potent greenhouse gas.
The Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning, National Natural Science Foundation of China, Carl Tryggers Foundation

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Nov-2015
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientists win 5 R&D 100 awards
Technologies that impact cyber security, increase our ability to detect trace amounts of chemicals, convert sewage into fuel, view energy processes under real-world conditions and forecast future electric needs are among the newest R&D 100 award winners.
US Department of Energy, and others

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Nov-2015
Scientific Reports
Microbes map path toward renewable energy future
In the quest for renewable fuels, scientists are taking lessons from a humble bacterium that fills our oceans and covers moist surfaces the world over. Cyanothece 51142, a type of bacteria also called blue-green algae, produces hydrogen in robust fashion, and scientists have found that it taps into an unexpected source of energy to do so.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Showing releases 1-25 out of 43.

1 | 2 > >>

 

 

Text-Only | Privacy Policy | Site Map