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DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-17 out of 17.

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Want to print your own cell phone microscope for pennies? Here's how
A 3-D printing process turns a cell phone into a high-powered microscope for pennies.
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Contact: Susan Bauer
susan.bauer@pnnl.gov
509-372-6083
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 12-Sep-2014
Ahoy, offshore wind: Research buoys bring vital data to untapped energy resource
Starting in November, two 20,000-pound buoys decked out with the latest in meteorological and oceanographic equipment will be deployed for a year at two offshore wind demonstration projects: one near Coos Bay, Ore., and another near Virginia Beach, Va. The bright yellow buoys -- each worth $1.3 million -- are being commissioned by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and will enable more accurate predictions of the power-producing potential of winds that blow off US shores.
Department of Energy

Contact: Franny White
franny.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
Angling chromium to let oxygen through
Researchers have been trying to increase the efficiency of solid oxide fuel cells by lowering the temperatures at which they run. More efficient fuel cells might gain wider use in vehicles or as quiet, pollution-free, neighborhood electricity generating stations. A serendipitous finding has resulted in a semiconducting material that could enable fuel cells to operate at temperatures two-thirds lower than current technology, scientists reported Aug. 18 in Nature Communications.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Sep-2014
Science
Birth of a mineral
One of the most important molecules on earth, calcium carbonate crystallizes into chalk, shells and minerals the world over. In a study led by the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, researchers used a powerful microscope that allows them to see the birth of crystals in real time, giving them a peek at how different calcium carbonate crystals form, they report in Sept. 5 issue of Science.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
American Chemical Society 248th National Meeting & Exposition
Journal of American Chemical Society
Water leads to chemical that gunks up biofuels production
Trying to understand the chemistry that turns plant material into the same energy-rich gasoline and diesel we put in our vehicles, researchers have discovered that water in the conversion process helps form an impurity which, in turn, slows down key chemical reactions.
Department of Energy

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 1-Aug-2014
Nature Communications
'Wetting' a battery's appetite for renewable energy storage
A new liquid metal alloy material enables sodium-beta batteries to operate at lower temperatures, which could help the batteries store more renewable energy and strengthen the power grid.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Franny White
frances.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Three PNNL staff elected to membership in state academy
Don Baer, Alain Bonneville, and Jud Virden, three scientists at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, have been selected to join the Washington State Academy of Sciences.

Contact: MaryAnne Wuennecke
maryanne.wuennecke@pnnl.gov
509-375-2447
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Jul-2014
Nature Materials
A noble gas cage
A new material called CC3 effectively traps xenon, krypton, and radon. These gases are used in industries such as lighting or medicine and, in the case of radon, one that can be hazardous when it accumulates in buildings. Research appearing on July 20th in Nature Materials shows how: by breathing enough to let the gases in but not out. The results might lead to cheaper, less energy intensive ways to extract these gases.
Department of Energy, Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Jul-2014
PNNL scientists win 3 R&D 100 awards for visual display, analytics and energy technologies
Technologies that rival electronic screens, enable new molecular analysis and reduce dependence on fossil fuels received recognition for their innovation today.

Contact: Eric Francavilla
eric.francavilla@pnnl.gov
509-372-4066
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
Silicon sponge improves lithium-ion battery performance
A sponge-like silicon material could help lithium-ion batteries run longer on a single charge by giving the batteries' electrodes the space they need to expand without breaking.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Franny White
franny.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 19-Jun-2014
DOE renews Energy Frontier Research Center at PNNL
The Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis is poised to take on new scientific challenges exploring chemical reactions at the core of technologies such as solar energy and fuel cells.
Department of Energy

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 1-May-2014
PLOS ONE
Whales hear us more than we realize
Killer whales and other marine mammals likely hear sonar signals more than we've known. That's because commercially available sonar systems, which are designed to create signals beyond the range of hearing of such animals, also emit signals known to be within their hearing range, scientists have discovered.
US Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
How a plant beckons the bacteria that will do it harm
A common plant puts out a welcome mat to bacteria seeking to invade, and scientists have discovered the mat's molecular mix. The team showed that the humble and oft-studied plant Arabidopsis puts out a molecular signal that invites an attack from a pathogen. The study reveals new targets during the battle between microbe, which often infects tomatoes, and host that researchers can exploit to protect plants.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
Angewandte Chemie International Edition
Halving hydrogen
Like a hungry diner ripping open a dinner roll, a fuel cell catalyst that converts hydrogen into electricity must tear open a hydrogen molecule. Now researchers have captured a view of such a catalyst holding onto the two halves of its hydrogen feast. The view confirms previous hypotheses and provides insight into how to make the catalyst work better for alternative energy uses, researchers reported in Angewandte Chemie International Edition.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Journal of Environmental Quality
Significant baseline levels of arsenic found in Ohio soils are due to natural processes
Geologic and soil processes are to blame for significant baseline levels of arsenic in soil throughout Ohio, according to a new study. The findings pose a challenge for regulators, who must determine what levels should trigger action when natural arsenic levels everywhere are above suggested screening standards.
Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geological Survey, US Geological Survey

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Nano Letters
Relieving electric vehicle range anxiety with improved batteries
A new, PNNL-developed nanomaterial called a metal organic framework could extend the lifespan of lithium-sulfur batteries, which could be used to increase the driving range of electric vehicles.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Franny White
franny.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
Fisheries
Making dams safer for fish around the world
The pressure changes that many fish experience when they travel through the turbulent waters near a dam can seriously injure or kill the fish. Scientists from around the world, including areas like Southeast Asia and Brazil where huge dams are planned or under construction, are working together to protect fish from the phenomenon, known as barotrauma.
US Army Corps of Engineers, US Department of Energy

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Showing releases 1-17 out of 17.

 

 

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