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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 35.

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Public Release: 19-Aug-2015
PNNL to tackle future grid challenges through new facility, capabilities
PNNL researchers and industry are now better equipped to tackle top challenges in grid modernization and buildings efficiency with the dedication today of the new Systems Engineering Building. The facility links real-time grid data, software platforms, specialized laboratories and advanced computing resources for the design and demonstration of new tools to modernize the grid and increase buildings energy efficiency.

Contact: Dawn Zimmerman
dawn.zimmerman@pnnl.gov
509-372-6618
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Aug-2015
American Chemical Society 250th National Meeting & Exposition
Energy in chemical bonds and the plant-pollution connection
Researchers from the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory will be honored and present new work at the 250th American Chemical Society national meeting in Boston, Massachusetts, Aug. 16-20.

Contact: PNNL News & Media Relations
greg.koller@pnnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 5-Aug-2015
IEEE Power & Energy Society General Meeting
Power grid forecasting tool reduces costly errors
PNNL has developed a new tool to forecast for future energy needs that is up to 50 percent more accurate than several commonly used industry tools, showing potential to save millions in wasted electricity. The advancement was selected a 'best paper' at the IEEE Power & Energy general meeting this week.

Contact: Dawn Zimmerman
dawn.zimmerman@pnnl.gov
509-372-6618
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Jul-2015
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics
Playing 'tag' with pollution lets scientists see who's 'it'
Using a climate model that can tag sources of soot and track where it lands, researchers have determined which areas around the Tibetan Plateau contribute the most soot -- and where. The model can also suggest the most effective way to reduce soot on the plateau, easing the amount of warming the region undergoes. The study, which appeared in Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics in June, might help policy makers target pollution reduction efforts.
US Department of Energy, National Basic Research Program of China

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Jul-2015
Nature
Tiny grains of rice hold big promise for greenhouse gas reductions, bioenergy
Rice is the staple food for more than half of the world's population, but the paddies it's grown in contributes up to 17 percent of global methane emissions -- about 100 million tons a year. Now, with the addition of a single gene, rice can be cultivated to emit virtually no methane, more starch for a richer food source and biomass for energy production, as announced in the July 30 edition of Nature and online.
The Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning, National Natural Science Foundation of China

Contact: Dawn Zimmerman
dawn.zimmerman@pnnl.gov
509-372-6618
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 12-Jul-2015
Science Advances
How clouds get their brightness
How clouds form and how they help set the temperature of the earth are two of the big remaining questions in climate research. Now, a study of clouds over the world's remotest ocean shows that ocean life is responsible for up to half the cloud droplets that pop in and out of existence during summer.
US Department of Energy, NASA, US Department of Defense, National Science Foundation

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Jul-2015
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to help small 'green' businesses
PNNL named a lead laboratory for new DOE Pilot designed to give small clean energy firms more technology assistance from DOE labs.
Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

Contact: Susan Bauer
susan.bauer@pnnl.gov
509-372-6083
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Jul-2015
Smart stuff: IQ of Northwest power grid raised, energy saved
Smart grid technologies and approaches can improve energy efficiency and possibly reduce power costs, according to the Pacific Northwest Smart Grid Demonstration Project's final report.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Franny White
frances.white@battelle.org
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 2-Jul-2015
Nature Communications
Aluminum clusters shut down molecular fuel factory
When aluminum atoms bunch up, porous materials called zeolites lose their ability to convert oil to gasoline. An international team of scientists created the first 3-D atomic map of a zeolite in order to find out how to improve catalysts used to produce fuel, biofuel and other chemicals.
Netherlands Research School Combination-Catalysis, Netherlands Research Council, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Laboratory Directed Research Development Program

Contact: Eric Francavilla
eric.francavilla@pnnl.gov
509-372-4066
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 11-May-2015
JOM
Out with heavy metal
Researchers have demonstrated a new process for the expanded use of lightweight aluminum in cars and trucks at the speed, scale, quality and consistency required by the auto industry. The process reduces production time and costs while yielding strong and lightweight parts, for example delivering a car door that is 62 percent lighter and 25 percent cheaper than that produced with today's manufacturing methods.
US Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, General Motors, TWB Company LLC, Alcoa

Contact: Dawn Zimmerman
dawn.zimmerman@pnnl.gov
509-372-6618
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-May-2015
Three PNNL scientists receive DOE Early Career Research Program awards, research funding
Three scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have been selected to receive 2015 Early Career Research Program research grants. The trio were among just 44 recipients nationwide to receive the annual research awards. Under the program, David Heldebrant, Dongsheng Li and Brent VanDevender will each receive five-year research grants that fund work designed to reduce carbon emissions, create new materials for energy storage and measure the mass of some of the smallest components of the universe.
DOE's Office of Science

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-May-2015
Pacific Northwest National Lab, Oregon Health & Science U team up for biomed research
The Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Oregon Health & Science University in Portland, Oregon, are joining forces to answer some of the world's most complex biomedical questions.

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Apr-2015
Physical Review Letters
Electron chirp: Cyclotron radiation from single electrons measured directly for first time
A group of almost 30 scientists and engineers from six research institutions reported the direct detection of cyclotron radiation from individual electrons April 20 in Physical Review Letters. They used a specially developed spectroscopic method that allowed them to measure the energy of electrons, one single electron at a time. The method provides a new way to potentially measure the mass of the neutrino, a subatomic particle that weighs at most two-billionths of a proton.
US Department of Energy Office of Science, University of Washington Royalty Research Foundation, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Wade Fellowship, National Science Foundation

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Apr-2015
Green Chemistry
Packing heat: New fluid makes untapped geothermal energy cleaner
More American homes could be powered by the Earth's natural underground heat with a nontoxic fluid that could cut in half the amount of water needed for a new power generation method called enhanced geothermal systems.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Franny White
franny.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Apr-2015
Nano Letters
Erupting electrodes: How recharging leaves behind microscopic debris inside batteries
An eruption of lithium at the tip of a battery's electrode, cracks in the electrode's body, and a coat forming on the electrode's surface reveal how recharging a battery many times leads to its demise. Using a powerful microscope to watch multiple cycles of charging and discharging under real battery conditions, researchers have gained insight into the chemistry that clogs rechargeable lithium batteries in work appearing in the March issue of the journal Nano Letters.
Department of Energy

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 2-Apr-2015
Analytical innovations bring $10 million back to national laboratory, Battelle
A suite of analytical innovations used to detect and measure very low levels of compounds and elements has topped $10 million in licensing income for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and its operator Battelle. It's the first time that income tied to a specific technology developed at PNNL has reached this level.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Mar-2015
American Chemical Society 249th National Meeting & Exposition
PNNL team wins American Chemical Society award
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory wins the first-ever team award for the American Chemical Society's Catalysis Lectureship for the Advancement of Catalytic Science.

Contact: MaryAnne Wuennecke
maryanne.wuennecke@PNNL.gov
509-375-2447
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Mar-2015
Nature Climate Change
The climate is starting to change faster
The Earth is now entering a period of changing climate that will likely be faster than what's occurred naturally over the last thousand years, according to a new paper in Nature Climate Change, committing people to live through and adapt to a warming world.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Mar-2015
Fuel Cells
Big box stores could ditch the grid, use natural gas fuel cells instead
Natural gas-powered solid oxide fuel cells, located at the point of use to produce electricity for facilities the size of big box stores, could provide economic and environmental benefits, with additional research, according to new study.
Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy

Contact: Susan Bauer
susan.bauer@mac.com
509-372-6083
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Mar-2015
Nature
Permafrost's turn of the microbes
As the Arctic warms, tons of carbon locked away in Arctic tundra will be transformed into the powerful greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and methane, but scientists know little about how that transition takes place. In a study appearing in today's issue of Nature, scientists looking at microbes in different types of Arctic soil have a new picture of life in permafrost that reveals entirely new species and hints that subzero microbes might be active.
Department of Energy, United States Geological Survey, Academy of Finland

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Feb-2015
Nature Communications
New flow battery to keep big cities lit, green and safe
The new zinc-polyiodide redox flow battery uses an electrolyte that has more than two times the energy density of the next-best flow battery used to store renewable energy and support the power grid. It's high energy density, and resulting lower cost, make it ideal for large cities where space is at a premium.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Franny White
franny.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Feb-2015
Nature Communications
Dendrite eraser: New electrolyte rids batteries of short-circuiting fibers
A new electrolyte allows rechargeable batteries to operate well without growing dendrites, tiny pin-like fibers that short-circuit rechargeable batteries.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Franny White
franny.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 30-Jan-2015
PNNL recognized for moving biofuel, chemical analysis innovations to market
Developing renewable fuel from wet algae and enabling analysis of complex liquids are two of the latest innovations Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has successfully driven to the market with the help of commercial partners.

Contact: Eric Francavilla
eric.francavilla@pnnl.gov
509-372-4066
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Jan-2015
Scientific Reports
Tracking fish easier, quicker, safer with new injectable device
A new acoustic fish-tracking tag is so tiny it can be injected with a syringe. It's small size enables researchers to more precisely and safely record how fish swim through dams and use that information to make dams more fish-friendly.
US Army Corps of Engineers

Contact: Franny White
franny.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology
Man trumps dog: Earlier assumption about BPA exposure confirmed
Coating the mouth with BPA-containing food, like soup, does not lead to higher than expected levels of BPA in blood, a new study in Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology shows. The study authors conclude that oral exposure does not create a risk for high exposures of BPA, also known as bisphenol A.
American Chemistry Council

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Showing releases 1-25 out of 35.

1 | 2 > >>

 

 

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