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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-23 out of 23.

Public Release: 4-Mar-2015
Argonne research expanding from injectors to inhalers
In collaboration with Australian researchers, Argonne's scientists are using decades of experience analyzing vehicle fuel injectors to study medical inhalers, hoping to unlock the secrets of the devices that are so well known to asthma sufferers everywhere.

Contact: Greg Cunningham
gcunningham@anl.gov
630-252-8232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Feb-2015
Argonne researchers to study Chicago emergency evacuation system
A group of Argonne researchers will be studying methods and creating tools for building more resilient mass transit systems to evacuate major cities under a $2.9 million grant announced this week by the US Department of Transportation's Federal Transit Administration.
US Department of Transportation/Federal Transit Administration

Contact: Greg Cunningham
gcunningham@anl.gov
630-252-8232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Jan-2015
Argonne model analyzes biofuel impacts
Argonne researchers today released a new version of an online analysis tool that will help biofuels developers gain a detailed understanding of water consumption of various types of feedstocks, aiding development of sustainable fuels that will reduce impact on limited water resources.
Department of Energy

Contact: Greg Cunningham
gcunningham@anl.gov
630-252-8232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 7-Jan-2015
Argonne partners with industry on nuclear work
Argonne National Laboratory will work with three of the world's leading nuclear products and services companies on projects that could unlock the potential of advanced nuclear reactor designs, helping create a new generation of safer, more efficient reactors.
US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy

Contact: Greg Cunningham
gcunningham@anl.gov
630-252-8232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Dec-2014
Nature Chemistry
Stunning zinc fireworks when egg meets sperm
Zinc flux plays a central role in regulating the biochemical processes that ensure a healthy egg-to-embryo transition, and this new unprecedented quantitative information should be useful in improving in vitro fertilization methods.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Energy

Contact: Tona Kunz
tkunz@anl.gov
630-252-5560
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Dec-2014
Physical Review Letters
Ultrafast imaging of complex systems in 3-D at near atomic resolution nears
It is becoming possible to image complex systems in 3-D with near-atomic resolution on ultrafast timescales using extremely intense X-ray free-electron laser pulses. One important step toward ultrafast imaging of samples with a single X-ray shot is understanding the interaction of extremely brilliant and intense X-ray pulses with the sample, including ionization rates.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Tona Kunz
tkunz@anl.gov
630-252-5560
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 12-Dec-2014
Science
Earth's most abundant mineral finally has a name
An ancient meteorite and high-energy X-rays have helped scientists conclude a half century of effort to find, identify and characterize a mineral that makes up 38 percent of the Earth.
US Department of Energy, NASA, National Science Foundation

Contact: Tona Kunz
tkunz@anl.gov
630-252-5560
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Dec-2014
Fueling the future
A team of researchers at the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory has partnered with industry leaders Cummins, Inc., and Convergent Science, Inc. to create integrated models of one key element of engine behavior: the fluid dynamics of fuel injectors in modern engines.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Greg Cunningham
gcunningham@anl.gov
630-252-8283
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 2-Dec-2014
Nano Letters
New technique simultaneously determines nanomaterials' chemical makeup, topography
A team of researchers from the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory and Ohio University have devised a powerful technique that simultaneously resolves the chemical characterization and topography of nanoscale materials down to the height of a single atom.
Department of Energy

Contact: Tona Kunz
tkunz@anl.gov
630-252-5560
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Science
Discovery sheds light on nuclear reactor fuel behavior during a severe event
A new discovery about the atomic structure of uranium dioxide will help scientists select the best computational model to simulate severe nuclear reactor accidents.
DOE/Office of Science, DOE/Small Business Innovation Research Program

Contact: Tona Kunz
tkunz@anl.gov
630-252-5560
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Oct-2014
Biogeochemistry
Argonne researchers create more accurate model for greenhouse gases from peatlands
Scientists at Argonne have created a new model to more accurately describe the greenhouse gases likely to be released from Arctic peatlands as they warm.
United States Department of Energy's Office of Science, National Science Foundation, United States Geological Survey Climate Research & Development Program, United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service

Contact: Brian Grabowski
media@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
Novel capability enables first test of real turbine engine conditions
Manufactures of turbine engines for airplanes, automobiles and electric generation plants could expedite the development of more durable, energy-efficient turbine blades thanks to a partnership between the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory, the German Aerospace Center and the universities of Central Florida and Cleveland State. The ability to operate turbine blades at higher temperatures improves efficiency and reduces energy costs.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, German Science Foundation

Contact: Tona Kunz
tkunz@anl.gov
630-252-5560
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Nature
X-rays unlock a protein's SWEET side
Understanding just how sugar makes its way into the cell could lead to the design of better drugs for diabetes patients and an increase in the amount of fruits and vegetables farmers are able to grow. Stanford University researchers have recently uncovered one of these 'pathways' into the cell by piecing together proteins slightly wider than the diameter of a strand of spider silk.
US Department of Energy, National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: Tona Kunz
tkunz@anl.gov
630-252-5560
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Nature Materials
Argonne scientists pioneer strategy for creating new materials
Making something new is never easy. Scientists constantly theorize about new materials, but when the material is manufactured it doesn't always work as expected. To create a new strategy for designing materials, scientists at the Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory combined two different approaches at two different facilities to synthesize new materials. This new strategy gives faster feedback on what growth schemes are best, thus shortening the timeframe to manufacture a new, stable material for energy transport and conversion applications.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Tona Kunz
tkunz@anl.gov
630-252-5560
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Cell Host & Microbe
Study reveals how Ebola blocks immune system
Researchers have identified one way the Ebola virus dodges the body's antiviral defenses, providing important insight that could lead to new therapies.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Brian Grabowski
media@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Bone
Revealing a novel mode of action for an osteoporosis drug
Raloxifene is a US Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment for decreasing fracture risk in osteoporosis. While raloxifene is as effective at reducing fracture risk as other current treatments, this works only partially by suppressing bone loss. X-ray studies revealed an additional mechanism underlying raloxifene action, providing an explanation for how this drug can achieve equivalent clinical benefit.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Energy

Contact: Tona Kunz
tkunz@anl.gov
630-252-5560
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Science
Mysteries of space dust revealed
The first analysis of space dust collected by a special collector onboard NASA's Stardust mission and sent back to Earth for study in 2006 suggests the tiny specks open a door to studying the origins of the solar system and possibly the origin of life itself.
NASA, US Department of Energy, Klaus Tschira Foundation, Tawani Foundation, German Science Foundation, Funds for Scientific Research -- Flanders, Belgium

Contact: Tona Kunz
tkunz@anl.gov
630-252-5560
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Science
Home is where the microbes are
A study published today in Science reports provides a detailed analysis of the microbes that live in houses and apartments. The study was conducted by researchers from the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Chicago.
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, National Institutes of Health, US Environmental Protection Agency, National Science Foundation

Contact: Brian Grabowski
bgrabowski@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Science
Composition of Earth's mantle revisited
Research published recently in Science suggested that the makeup of the Earth's lower mantle, which makes up the largest part of the Earth by volume, is significantly different than previously thought. This should shed light on unexplained seismic phenomena.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, NNSA

Contact: Tona Kunz
630-252-5560
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Science
Unprecedented detail of intact neuronal receptor offers blueprint for drug developers
Scientists succeeded in obtaining an unprecedented view of a type of brain-cell receptor that is implicated in a range of neurological illnesses, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, depression, schizophrenia, autism, and ischemic injuries associated with stroke.
US Department of Energy, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Tona Kunz
tkunz@anl.gov
630-252-5560
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-May-2014
Solar Energy
Solar panel manufacturing is greener in Europe than China, study says
Solar panels made in China have a higher overall carbon footprint and are likely to use substantially more energy during manufacturing than those made in Europe, said a new study from Northwestern University and Argonne.
Institute for Sustainability and Energy at Northwestern University, US Department of Energy

Contact: Jared Sagoff
media@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-May-2014
Nature Communications
Argonne scientists discover new phase in iron-based superconductors
Scientists at the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory have discovered a previously unknown phase in a class of superconductors called iron arsenides. This sheds light on a debate over the interactions between atoms and electrons that are responsible for their unusual superconductivity.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 1-May-2014
Science
Study in Science finds missing piece of biogeochemical puzzle in aquifers
A study published today in Science by researchers from the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory may dramatically shift our understanding of the complex dance of microbes and minerals that takes place in aquifers deep underground. This dance affects groundwater quality, the fate of contaminants in the ground and the emerging science of carbon sequestration.
US Department of Energy's Office of Science

Contact: Brian Grabowski
bgrabowski@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Showing releases 1-23 out of 23.

 

 

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