U.S.Department of Energy Research News
Text-Only | Privacy Policy | Site Map  
Search Releases and Features  
Biological SciencesComputational SciencesEnergy SciencesEnvironmental SciencesPhysical SciencesEngineering and TechnologyNational Security Science

Home
Labs
Multimedia Resources
News Releases
Feature Stories
Library
Contacts
RSS Feed



US Department of Energy National Science Bowl


Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 42.

1 | 2 > >>

Public Release: 10-Feb-2016
Nature Photonics
Scientists take nanoparticle snapshots
An international team of researchers led by X-ray scientist Christoph Bostedt of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory and Tais Gorkhover of DOE's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory used two special lasers to observe the dynamics of a small sample of xenon as it was heated to a plasma.
DOE/Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences Program, Volkswagen Foundation

Contact: Jarod Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 27-Jan-2016
Journal of Applied Physics
Imaged 'jets' reveal cerium's post-shock inner strength
'Jets' formed after shock waves passed through cerium metal provided the yield stress of cerium in its post-shock state, indicating the stress that would cause it to become permanently deformed.
United States Department of Energy Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences

Contact: Chris Kramer
ckramer@anl.gov
630-252-5580
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Jan-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Annihilating nanoscale defects
Researchers at the University of Chicago and Argonne may have found a way for the semiconductor industry to hit miniaturization targets on time and without defects.
United States Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences Materials Energy Program

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Jan-2016
Nature
Superoxide gives lithium-air batteries a jolt
In a recent experiment, Argonne battery scientists Jun Lu, Larry Curtiss and Khalil Amine, along with American and Korean collaborators, were able to produce stable crystallized lithium superoxide (LiO2) instead of lithium peroxide during battery discharging. Unlike lithium peroxide, lithium superoxide can easily dissociate into lithium and oxygen, leading to high efficiency and good cycle life.
United States Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and Office of Science

Contact: jsagoff@anl.gov
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Dec-2015
New sister Interoperability Center opens in Europe
As global electric vehicle sales continue to rise, the European Union opened the first European Interoperability Center for Electric Vehicles and Smart Grids last month to make sure all of these cars have a standard plug and equipment that can work anywhere.
US Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy's Vehicle Technologies Office, European Commission

Contact: Gregory Cunningham
gcunningham@anl.gov
630-252-8232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 7-Dec-2015
Scripta Materialia
High-energy X-rays give industry affordable way to optimize cast iron
Researchers from Caterpillar and the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory conducted a proof of principle study that shows that high-energy synchrotron X-rays from the Advanced Photon Source can provide a new, affordable way for industry to optimize the mechanical and physical properties of cast iron in the manufacturing process.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Tona Kunz
tkunz@anl.gov
630-252-5560
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Nov-2015
Argonne researcher awarded for leadership in energy and global security
Crain's Chicago Business named Leah Guzowski, director for strategy and research programs at the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory, to its annual 40 under 40 list.

Contact: Greg Cunningham
gcunningham@anl.gov
630-252-8232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 12-Nov-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
New information about bacterial enzymes to help scientists develop more effective antibiotics, cancer drugs
New research from Argonne, Scripps Research Institute and Rice University now allows researchers to manipulate nature's biosynthetic machinery to produce more effective antibiotics and cancer-fighting drugs.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Brian Grabowski
bgrabowski@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Nov-2015
ALCF helps tackle the Large Hadron Collider's big data challenge
To help tackle the considerable challenge of interpreting data, researchers from the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Argonne National Laboratory are demonstrating the potential of simulating collision events with Mira, a 10-petaflops IBM Blue Gene/Q supercomputer at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF), a DOE Office of Science User Facility.

Contact: Brian Grabowski
bgrabowski@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 2-Nov-2015
PLOS ONE
Study reveals structure of tuberculosis enzyme, could offer drug target
A team of scientists, including several from the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory, have determined the structures of several important tuberculosis enzymes, which could lead to new drugs for the disease.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, and DOE Office of Science

Contact: Brian Grabowski
bgrabowski@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Oct-2015
Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series
Researchers model birth of universe in one of largest cosmological simulations ever run
Researchers are sifting through an avalanche of data produced by one of the largest cosmological simulations ever performed, led by scientists at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory.
US Department of Energy Office of Science, High Energy Physics, Advanced Scientific Computing Research

Contact: Brian Grabowski
bgrabowski@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Oct-2015
Physical Review Letters
Scientists gain insight into origin of tungsten-ditelluride's magnetoresistance
Two new significant findings may move scientists closer to understanding the origins of tungsten-ditelluride's (WTe2) extremely large magnetoresistance, a key characteristic in modern electronic devices like magnetic hard drives and sensors. Scientists in Illinois recently discovered that tungsten-ditelluride (WTe2) is electronically three-dimensional with a low anisotropy.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Oct-2015
Analysis shows greenhouse gas emissions similar for shale, crude oil
The US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory this week released a pair of studies on the efficiency of shale oil production excavation. The reports show that shale oil production generates greenhouse gas emissions at levels similar to traditional crude oil production.
Vehicle Technology Office and the Bioenergy Technology Office of the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office, US Department of Energy

Contact: Greg Cunningham
gcunningham@anl.gov
630-252-8232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Oct-2015
Nature Communications
One direction: Researchers grow nanocircuitry with semiconducting graphene nanoribbons
Researchers from the University of Wisconsin at Madison are the first to grow self-directed graphene nanoribbons on the surface of the semiconducting material germanium. This allows the semiconducting industry to tailor specific paths for nanocircuitry in their technologies. Confirmation of the findings was done at Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials.
U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science, Natural Science and Engineering Research Council, University of Wisconsin Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, Department of Defense Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: Justin H. S. Breaux
jbreaux@anl.gov
630-252-5823
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Sep-2015
Science
The rise of X-ray beam chemistry
By using powerful photon beams generated by the Advanced Photon Source, a DOE User Facility, researchers have shown that they can now control the chemical environment and provide nanoscale structural detail while simultaneously imaging the mineral calcite as it is pushed to its extremes.
Geosciences Research Program of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences

Contact: Justin H. S. Breaux
jbreaux@anl.gov
630-252-5823
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Sep-2015
Science
Team announces breakthrough observation of Mott transition in a superconductor
An international team of researchers announced today in Science the observation of a dynamic Mott transition in a superconductor. The discovery experimentally connects the worlds of classical and quantum mechanics and illuminates the mysterious nature of the Mott transition. It also could shed light on non-equilibrium physics, which is poorly understood but governs most of what occurs in our world. The finding may also represent a step towards more efficient electronics based on the Mott transition.
Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research, Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter, US Department of Energy Office of Science, Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation, Alexander von Humboldt Foundation

Contact: Justin Breaux
media@anl.gov
630-252-5593
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Sep-2015
Physical Review Letters
Insights into obscure transition uncovered by X-rays
The list of potential mechanisms that underlie an unusual metal-insulator transition has been narrowed by a team of scientists using a combination of X-ray techniques. This transition has ramifications for material design for electronics and sensors.
US Department of Energy, US Department of Defense

Contact: Tona Kunz
tkunz@anl.gov
630-252-5560
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Sep-2015
Nature
Extreme pressure causes osmium to change state of matter
Using metallic osmium in experimentation, an international group of researchers have demonstrated that ultra-high pressures cause core electrons to interplay, which results in experimentally observed anomalies in the compression behavior of the material.
Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, German Federal Ministry of Education and Research, Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research, Swedish Research Council, Swedish Government, Swedish e-Science Research Center

Contact: Tona Kunz
tkunz@anl.gov
630-252-5560
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 2-Sep-2015
Chemical Communications
Making fuel from light
Photosynthesis has given life to the planet. While scientists have been studying and mimicking the natural phenomenon in the laboratory for years, understanding how to replicate the chemical process behind it has largely remained a mystery -- until now.
DOE/Basic Energy Sciences

Contact: Christopher Kramer
ckramer@anl.gov
630-252-5580
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Aug-2015
Argonne pushing boundaries of computing in engine simulations
Researchers at the Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory will be testing the limits of computing horsepower this year with a new simulation project from the Virtual Engine Research Institute and Fuels Initiative that will harness 60 million computer core hours to reduce those uncertainties and pave the way to more effective engine simulations.
US Department of Energy's Office of Vehicle Technologies

Contact: Greg Cunningham
gcunningham@anl.gov
630-252-8232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 7-Aug-2015
Journal of the American Chemical Society
Copper clusters capture and convert carbon dioxide to make fuel
The chemical reactions that make methanol from carbon dioxide rely on a catalyst to speed up the conversion, and Argonne scientists identified a new material that could fill this role. With its unique structure, this catalyst can capture and convert carbon dioxide in a way that ultimately saves energy.
DOE/Office of Basic Energy Sciences

Contact: Louise Lerner
media@anl.gov
630-252-5526
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Aug-2015
Cell Host & Microbe
Gut microbes affect circadian rhythms in mice, study says
A study including researchers from the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Chicago found evidence that gut microbes affect circadian rhythms and metabolism in mice.

Contact: Brian Grabowski
bgrabowski@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 30-Jul-2015
Argonne National Lab finds butanol is good for boats
Argonne has collaborated with Bombardier Recreational Products and the National Marine Manufacturers Association to demonstrate the effectiveness of a fuel blend with 16 percent butane. This blend would incorporate more biofuels into marine fuel without the issues caused by increasing levels of ethanol, which can cause difficulties in marine engines at high concentrations.
Vehicle Technologies Office within DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

Contact: Greg Cunningham
gcunningham@anl.gov
630-252-8232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Jul-2015
Physical Review Letters
Young scientist discovers magnetic material unnecessary to create spin current
Research at Argonne indicates that you don't need a magnetic material to create spin current from insulators--with important implications for the field of spintronics and the development of high-speed, low-power electronics that use electron spin rather than charge to carry information.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Angela Hardin
media@anl.gov
630-252-5501
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Jul-2015
Science Express
Simulations lead to design of near-frictionless material
Argonne scientists used the Mira supercomputer to identify and improve a new mechanism for eliminating friction, which fed into the development of a hybrid material that exhibited superlubricity at the macroscale for the first time. ALCF researchers helped enable the groundbreaking simulations by overcoming a performance bottleneck that doubled the speed of the team's code.

Contact: Brian Grabowski
bgrabowski@anl.gov
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Showing releases 1-25 out of 42.

1 | 2 > >>

 

 

Text-Only | Privacy Policy | Site Map