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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 33.

1 | 2 > >>

Public Release: 29-Jan-2015
Science
New clues about a brain protein with high affinity for Valium
Valium, one of the best known antianxiety drugs, produces its calming effects by binding with a particular protein in the brain. But the drug has an almost equally strong affinity for a completely different protein. New studies revealing atomic level details of this secondary interaction might offer clues about Valium's side effects and point the way to more effective drugs.
National Institutes of Health, New York Structural Biology Center, DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Jan-2015
Nature Communications
Nanoscale mirrored cavities amplify, connect quantum memories
Constructing tiny 'mirrors' to trap light increases the efficiency with which photons can pick up and transmit information about electronic spin states -- which is essential for scaling up quantum memories for functional quantum computing systems and networks.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research, DOE/Office of Science, Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, NASA/Office of the Chief Technologist's Space Technology Research Fellowship, National Science Foundation

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Jan-2015
Nature Communications
Self-assembled nanotextures create antireflective surface on silicon solar cells
Scientists at Brookhaven National Laboratory show that etching a nanoscale texture onto silicon creates an antireflective surface that works as well as state-of-the-art thin-film multilayer antireflective coatings for solar cells.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 19-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Self-destructive effects of magnetically-doped ferromagnetic topological insulators
A new atomic-scale study of the surface properties of certain ferromagnetic topological insulators reveals that these materials exhibit extreme, unexpected, and self-destructive electronic disorder.
US Department of Energy, Institute of Basic Science of Korea

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 12-Jan-2015
Nature Materials
Solar cell polymers with multiplied electrical output
A team from Brookhaven Lab and Columbia University has paired up photovoltaic polymers that produce two units of electricity per unit of light instead of the usual one on a single molecular polymer chain. Having the two charges on the same molecule means the light-absorbing, energy-producing materials work efficiently when dissolved in liquids, which opens the way for a wide range of industrial scale manufacturing processes, including 'printing' solar-energy-producing material like ink.
US Department of Energy Office of Science, National Science Foundation, 3M

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Jan-2015
Science
Compact batteries enhanced by spontaneous silver matrix formations
The formation of a highly conductive silver matrix inside an otherwise poorly performing battery enhances its efficiency and offers new potential applications. Scientists used x-rays to see where, when, and how these nanoscale 'bridges' emerge and develop new material designs and optimization techniques.
US Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences

Contact: Justin Eure
jeure@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Microscopy reveals how atom-high steps impede oxidation of metal surfaces
A new study reveals that certain features of metal surfaces can stop the process of oxidation in its tracks. The findings could be relevant to understanding and perhaps controlling oxidation in a wide range of materials -- from catalysts to the superalloys used in jet engine turbines and the oxides in microelectronics.
DOE Office of Science

Contact: Justin Eure
jeure@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
Nature Communications
Unusual electronic state found in new class of unconventional superconductors
Scientists have discovered an unusual form of electronic order in a new family of unconventional superconductors, giving scientists a new group of materials to explore to understand ability to carry current with no energy loss.
Department of Energy Office of Science, US National Science Foundation, Japan Society of the Promotion of Science, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Friends of Todai Inc.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Genes and Development
Key moment mapped in assembly of DNA-splitting molecular machine
Scientists reveal crucial steps and surprising structures in the genesis of the enzyme that divides the DNA double helix during cell replication.
National Institutes of Health, United Kingdom Medical Research Council

Contact: Justin Eure
jeure@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 7-Oct-2014
The Plant Cell
Researchers pump up oil accumulation in plant leaves
A series of detailed genetic studies points scientists to a new way to dramatically increase the accumulation of oil in plant leaves, an abundant source of biomass for fuel production.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 1-Oct-2014
Physical Review Letters
Hide and seek: Sterile neutrinos remain elusive
The Daya Bay Collaboration, an international group of scientists studying the subtle transformations of subatomic particles called neutrinos, is publishing its first results on the search for a so-called sterile neutrino, a possible new type of neutrino beyond the three known neutrino 'flavors,' or types. The existence of this elusive particle, if proven, would have a profound impact on our understanding of the universe, and could impact the design of future neutrino experiments.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Sep-2014
New NIH/DOE grant for life science studies at NSLS-II
A new grant just awarded by the National Institutes of Health and the US Department of Energy will fund the operation of a suite of powerful experimental tools for Life Sciences research at DOE's Brookhaven National Laboratory.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, US Department of Energy

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Elusive quantum transformations found near absolute zero
Scientists mapped quantum phase transitions at temperatures colder than interstellar space. The ultra-cold conditions isolated the fluctuations that define the electronic, magnetic, and thermodynamic performance of metallic materials. The research provides new methods to identify and understand materials with powerful and unexpected properties, including superconductivity.
U.S. Department of Energy

Contact: Justin Eure
jeure@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 19-Aug-2014
Physical Review Letters
First indirect evidence of so-far undetected strange baryons
New supercomputing calculations provide the first evidence that particles predicted by the theory of quark-gluon interactions but never before observed are being produced in heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider.
Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing program of the DOE Office of Science (Nuclear Physics and Advanced Scientific Computing Research), Federal Ministry of Education and Research of Germany, German Research Foundation

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Nature Communications
Promising ferroelectric materials suffer from unexpected electric polarizations
Brookhaven Lab scientists find surprising locked charge polarizations that explain the poor performance of next-gen materials that would otherwise revolutionize data-driven devices.
US Department of Energy's Office of Science

Contact: Justin Eure
jeure@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Aug-2014
Nature Communications
Nanoscale details of electrochemical reactions in electric vehicle battery materials
Using a new method to track the electrochemical reactions in a common electric vehicle battery material under operating conditions, scientists have revealed new insight into why fast charging inhibits this material's performance. The results could inform battery makers' efforts to optimize materials for faster-charging batteries with higher capacity.
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory, US Department of Energy

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
Science
Nanostructured metal-oxide catalyst efficiently converts CO2 to methanol
Scientists have discovered a new catalytic system for converting carbon dioxide (CO2) to methanol -- a key commodity used to create a wide range of industrial chemicals and fuels. With significantly higher activity than other catalysts now in use, the new system could make it easier to get normally unreactive CO2 to participate in these reactions.
DOE/Office of Science, Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad of Spain, European Regional Development Fund, Instituto de Tecnologia Venezolana para el Petroleo

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Jun-2014
Funding renewed for Brookhaven's Center for Emergent Superconductivity
The US Department of Energy has announced an extension of funding totaling $14 million over four years for the Center for Emergent Superconductivity, an Energy Frontier Research Center led by Brookhaven Lab with partners from the University of Illinois and Argonne National Laboratory.
DOE Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Jun-2014
Journal of American Chemical Society
DNA-linked nanoparticles form switchable 'thin films' on a liquid surface
Scientists have used DNA-linked nanoparticles to form a single-particle-thick layer on a liquid surface where the properties of the layer can be easily switched. Understanding the assembly of such nanostructured thin films provides a possible pathway to adjustable filters, surfaces with variable mechanical response, or even new ways to deliver genes for biomedical applications.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Jun-2014
Science
Scientists reveal details of calcium 'safety-valve' in cells
The New York Consortium on Membrane Protein Structure used X-rays at Brookhaven Lab's National Synchrotron Light Source to decipher the atomic level structure of a protein that regulates the level of calcium in cells, providing clues about a key signaling agent that can trigger programmed cell death and potentially leading to new anticancer drug targets.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Energy

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 27-May-2014
Large Hadron Collider Physics Conference
Large Hadron Collider Physics Conference in New York City, June 2-7
Hundreds of physicists from around the world will gather in New York City June 2-7 to discuss the origin of mass, supersymmetry, and other mysteries of matter and the universe at the second annual Large Hadron Collider Physics Conference.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 12-May-2014
Three Brookhaven physicists receive DOE Early Career Research Program funding
Three physicists at Brookhaven Lab are among 35 scientists selected by DOE's Office of Science to receive Early Career Research Program funding. Their work spans several subfields of physics -- from describing the dynamics of high-energy collisions of atomic nuclei at particle colliders, to exploring magnetic excitations in materials that offer promise for carrying loss-free electric current, to developing new ways to track elusive neutrinos.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 9-May-2014
Journal of Biological Chemistry
Plants' oil-desaturating enzymes pair up to channel metabolites
Plant scientists find fatty acid desaturating enzymes link up to pass intermediate products from one enzyme to another. Engineering these enzyme interactions could be a new approach for tailoring plants to produce useful products.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 8-May-2014
Science
Scientists find solution to 2 long-standing mysteries of cuprate superconductivity
Detailed studies of a material as it transforms from an insulator through the 'pseudogap' into a full-blown superconductor links two 'personality' changes of electrons at a critical point.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 30-Apr-2014
Nature Communications
Harnessing magnetic vortices for making nanoscale antennas
Scientists seeking ways to synchronize the magnetic spins in nanoscale devices to build tiny yet more powerful signal-generating or receiving antennas and other electronics have published a study showing that stacked nanoscale magnetic vortices separated by an extremely thin layer of copper can be driven to operate in unison. These devices could potentially produce a powerful signal that could be put to work in a new generation of cell phones, computers, and other applications.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Showing releases 1-25 out of 33.

1 | 2 > >>

 

 

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