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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 39.

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Public Release: 30-Aug-2016
Five Brookhaven Lab projects selected as R&D 100 award finalists
Five projects from the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory have been selected as finalists for the 2016 R&D 100 awards, which honor the top 100 proven technological advances of the past year as determined by a panel selected by R&D Magazine.
DOE/Office of Science, National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, Brookhaven's Technology Maturation Program

Contact: Kay Cordtz
kcordtz@bnl.gov
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Aug-2016
Nature
Scientists uncover origin of high-temperature superconductivity in copper-oxide compound
Brookhaven physicist Ivan Bozovic and his team have an explanation for why certain materials can conduct electricity without resistance at temperatures well above those required by conventional superconductors. Understanding this exotic behavior may pave the way for engineering materials that become superconducting at room temperature -- a capability that could transform the way energy is produced, transmitted, and used.
DOE/Office of Science, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

Contact: Ariana Tantillo
atantillo@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Aug-2016
Big PanDA tackles big data for physics and other future extreme scale scientific applications
A team of physicists just received $2.1 million in funding for 2016-2017 from DOE's Advanced Scientific Computing Research program to enhance a 'workload management system' for handling the ever-increasing data demands of two experiments at the Large Hadron Collider and expanding its use as a general workload management service for a Department of Energy supercomputer.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 12-Aug-2016
Nature Communications
Slicing through materials with a new X-ray imaging technique
Researchers at the US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory have created a new imaging technique that allows scientists to probe the internal makeup of a battery during charging and discharging using different X-ray energies while rotating the battery cell. The technique produces a three-dimensional chemical map and lets the scientists track chemical reactions in the battery over time in working conditions. Their work is published in the Aug. 12 issue of Nature Communications.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Chelsea Whyte
cwhyte@bnl.gov
631-344-8671
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Aug-2016
Nature Communications
Smarter self-assembly opens new pathways for nanotechnology
Scientists at Brookhaven National Laboratory have just developed a way to direct the self-assembly of multiple molecular patterns within a single material, producing new nanoscale architectures. This is a significant conceptual leap in self-assembly that could change the way we design and manufacture electronics.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 2-Aug-2016
Physical Review Letters
Scientists model the 'flicker' of gluons in subatomic smashups
A new study just published in Physical Review Letters reveals that a high degree of gluon fluctuation -- a kind of flickering rearrangement in the distribution of gluon density within individual protons -- could help explain some of the remarkable results at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider -- a US Department of Energy Office of Science User Facility for nuclear physics research at DOE's Brookhaven National Laboratory -- and also in nuclear physics experiments at the Large Hadron Collider in Europe.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Jul-2016
Nature Chemical Biology
Scientists determine structure of enzyme linked with key cell-signaling protein
Scientists have captured atomic level snapshots showing how one key enzyme modifies a protein involved in turning genes on or off inside cells. Understanding this process helps explain how complex organisms can arise from a finite number of genes. The research also identifies links between defects in this particular enzyme and certain cancers, potentially pointing to new drug targets.
National Institutes of Health, Stony Brook University-Brookhaven National Laboratory Seed Grant, DOE/Office of Science, and Eli Lilly Company

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Jun-2016
Nature Communications
Study shows trees with altered lignin are better for biofuels
By engineering a novel enzyme involved in lignin synthesis, scientists at the US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory and collaborators have altered the lignin in plant cell walls in a way that increases access to biofuel building blocks without inhibiting plant growth.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Jun-2016
Nature Communications
Discovery of gold nanocluster 'double' hints at other shape-changing particles
Researchers discovered an entirely unexpected atomic arrangement of Gold-144, a molecule-sized nanogold cluster whose structure had been theoretically predicted but never confirmed.
Department of Energy Office of Science, National Science Foundation, Villum Foundation, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Colorado State University, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Ariana Tantillo
atantillo@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
Nature Chemistry
DNA shaping up to be ideal framework for rationally designed nanostructures
Scientists developed two DNA-based self-assembly approaches for desired nanostructures. The first approach allows the same set of nanoparticles to be connected into a variety of three-dimensional structures; the second facilitates the integration of different nanoparticles and DNA frames into interconnecting modules, expanding the diversity of possible structures. These approaches could enable the rational design of nanomaterials with enhanced or combined optical, electric, and magnetic properties to achieve desired functions.
US Department of Energy, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Ariana Tantillo
atantillo@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 2-Jun-2016
Science
Scientists find surprising magnetic excitations in a metallic compound
Scientists have found magnetic excitations in a metallic compound whose main source of magnetism is the orbital movement of its electrons. Their discovery challenges conventional wisdom that these excitations are only found in materials whose magnetism is dominated by the spin of its electrons.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research, Netherlands Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter

Contact: Ariana Tantillo
atantillo@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 1-Jun-2016
PROSPECT experiment's search for sterile neutrinos garners $3 million DOE grant
An experiment led by Yale University with partners from four US Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories, including Brookhaven National Laboratory, and 10 universities will explore key questions about elusive particles called neutrinos with potential application for improving nuclear reactor safety.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 24-May-2016
Physical Review Letters
Revealing the nature of magnetic interactions in manganese oxide
A mathematical approach for studying local magnetic interactions has helped scientists understand the magnetic properties of a material with long-range magnetic order.
DOE/Office of Science, National Science Foundation

Contact: Ariana Tantillo
atantillo@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-May-2016
Angewandte Chemie International Edition
Speeding up key oxygen-oxygen bond-formation step in water oxidation
By accelerating the formation of the oxygen-oxygen bond in water oxidation, newly developed ruthenium catalysts could drive the reaction needed to efficiently store solar energy in the chemical bonds of clean fuels. Initial electrochemistry studies demonstrated that these catalysts could offer a low-energy pathway to faster water oxidation.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Ariana Tantillo
atantillo@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 9-May-2016
Nature Communications
Visualizing the lithiation of a nanosized iron-oxide material in real time
An electron microscopy technique for visualizing how lithium ions migrate at the nanoscale could help improve the performance of lithium-ion batteries.

Contact: Ariana Tantillo
atantillo@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Apr-2016
Nature
Elusive state of superconducting matter discovered after 50 years
Scientists at the US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory, Cornell University, and collaborators have produced the first direct evidence of a state of electronic matter first predicted by theorists in 1964 -- a 'Cooper pair density wave.' The discovery, described in a paper published online April 13, 2016, in Nature, may provide key insights into the workings of high-temperature superconductors.
Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Apr-2016
ACS Nano
Quantum dots enhance light-to-current conversion in layered semiconductors
Scientists combined the excellent light-harvesting properties of quantum dots with the tunable electrical conductivity of a layered tin disulfide semiconductor to produce a hybrid material that exhibited enhanced light-harvesting and energy transfer properties. The research paves the way for using these materials in optoelectronic applications such as energy-harvesting photovoltaics, light sensors, and light emitting diodes (LEDs).
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 5-Apr-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Insulator-superconductor transition of copper-oxide compound studied in fine detail
Using a highly controlled deposition technique, scientists from the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory have synthesized ultrathin films containing multiple samples of a copper-oxide compound to study the compound's electronic behavior at near absolute zero, or minus 459 degrees Fahrenheit. Their study revealed that fluctuations in the distribution of electrical charges at near-absolute-zero temperature compete with superconductivity.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Ariana Tantillo
atantillo@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Mar-2016
Physical Review Letters
A view of the colorful microcosm within a proton
By analyzing the particle debris emitted from collisions of polarized protons at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, scientists say they've found a new way to glimpse the microcosm within these building blocks of matter. They've measured a key effect of the so-called color interaction -- the basis for the strong nuclear force that binds quarks within the proton.
DOE Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Feb-2016
Science
Synchronized leaf aging in the Amazon responsible for seasonal increases in photosynthesis
High-tech photography in the Amazon reveals that young leaves grow in at the same times as older ones perish, in strong contrast to temperate forests in North America or Europe, resulting in seasonal increases in photosynthesis that must be taken into account to build more accurate climate models.
National Science Foundation, NASA Terra-Aqua Science, GoAmazon Project, US Department of Energy, Brazilian State Science Foundations/Sao Paolo & Amazônas

Contact: Chelsea Whyte
cwhyte@bnl.gov
631-344-8671
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 12-Feb-2016
Physical Review Letters
Most precise measurement of reactor Antineutrino spectrum reveals intriguing surprise
Members of the International Daya Bay Collaboration, who track the production and flavor-shifting behavior of electron antineutrinos generated at a nuclear power complex in China, have obtained the most precise measurement of these subatomic particles' energy spectrum ever recorded.
Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 12-Feb-2016
Scientific Reports
Graphene leans on glass to advance electronics
Scientists have developed a simple and powerful method for creating resilient, customized, and high-performing graphene: layering it on top of common glass. This scalable and inexpensive process helps pave the way for a new class of microelectronic and optoelectronic devices -- everything from efficient solar cells to touch screens.
DOE/Office of Science, Brookhaven Laboratory Directed Research and Development

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Feb-2016
Nature Structural & Molecular Biology
Scientists propose 'pumpjack' mechanism for splitting and copying DNA
New close-up images of the proteins that copy DNA inside the nucleus of a cell have led a team of scientists to propose a brand new mechanism for how this molecular machinery works. The scientists studied proteins from yeast cells, which share many features with the cells of complex organisms such as humans, and could offer new insight into ways that DNA replication can go awry.
National Institutes of Health, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Brookhaven Lab Biology Department

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Feb-2016
Nature Physics
Chiral magnetic effect generates quantum current
Scientists at the US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory and Stony Brook University have discovered a new way to generate very low-resistance electric current in a new class of materials. The discovery, which relies on the separation of right- and left-"handed" particles, points to a range of potential applications in energy, quantum computing, and medical imaging, and possibly even a new mechanism for inducing superconductivity-the ability of some materials to carry current with no energy loss.
DOE Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Feb-2016
Science
Scientists guide gold nanoparticles to form 'diamond' superlattices
Using bundled strands of DNA to build Tinkertoy-like tetrahedral cages, scientists have devised a way to trap and arrange nanoparticles in a way that mimics the crystalline structure of diamond. The achievement of this complex yet elegant arrangement may open a path to new materials that take advantage of the optical and mechanical properties of this crystalline structure for applications such as optical transistors, color-changing materials, and lightweight yet tough materials.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Showing releases 1-25 out of 39.

1 | 2 > >>

 

 

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