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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 27.

1 | 2 > >>

Public Release: 28-Jul-2015
Journal of Chemical Physics
New computer model could explain how simple molecules took first step toward life
Sergei Maslov, a computational biologist at the US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory and adjunct professor at Stony Brook University, and Alexei Tkachenko, a scientist at Brookhaven's Center for Functional Nanomaterials, have developed a model that explains how simple monomers could rapidly make the jump to more complex self-replicating polymers. What their model points to could have intriguing implications for the origins of life on Earth and CFN's work in engineering artificial self-assembly at the nanoscale.
DOE Office of Science

Contact: Peter Genzer
genzer@bnl.gov
631-344-3174
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Jun-2015
Nature Communications
X-rays and electrons join forces to map catalytic reactions in real-time
A new technique pioneered at Brookhaven Lab reveals atomic-scale changes during catalytic reactions in real time and under real operating conditions.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Justin Eure
jeure@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Jun-2015
Nature Communications
Sweeping lasers snap together nanoscale geometric grids
New technique developed by Brookhaven Lab scientists to rapidly create multi-layered, self-assembled grids could transform the manufacture of high-tech coatings for anti-reflective surfaces, improved solar cells, and touchscreen electronics.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Justin Eure
jeure@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Jun-2015
Physics Review Letters
Scientists see ripples of a particle-separating wave in primordial plasma
Scientists in the STAR collaboration at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, a particle accelerator exploring nuclear physics and the building blocks of matter at the US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory, have new evidence for what's called a 'chiral magnetic wave' rippling through the soup of quark-gluon plasma created in RHIC's energetic particle smashups.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 25-May-2015
Nature Materials
Engineering phase changes in nanoparticle arrays
Scientists at the US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory have just taken a big step toward the goal of engineering dynamic nanomaterials whose structure and associated properties can be switched on demand. In a paper appearing in Nature Materials, they describe a way to selectively rearrange the nanoparticles in three-dimensional arrays to produce different configurations, or phases, from the same nano-components.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 25-May-2015
Nature Nanotechnology
DNA double helix does double duty in assembling arrays of nanoparticles
In a new twist on the use of DNA in nanoscale construction, scientists at the US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory and collaborators put synthetic strands of the biological material to work in two ways: They used ropelike configurations of the DNA double helix to form a rigid geometrical framework, and added dangling pieces of single-stranded DNA to glue nanoparticles in place.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-May-2015
Science Advances
Visualizing how radiation bombardment boosts superconductivity
Study shows how heavy-ion induced atomic-scale defects in iron-based superconductors 'pin' potentially disruptive quantum vortices, enabling high currents to flow unimpeded. The study opens a new way forward for designing and understanding superconductors that can operate in demanding high-current, high magnetic field applications, such as zero-energy-loss power transmission lines and energy-generating turbines.
Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Apr-2015
Nature Communications
Scientists use nanoscale building blocks and DNA 'glue' to shape 3-D superlattices
Taking child's play with building blocks to a whole new level-the nanometer scale-scientists at the US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory have constructed 3-D 'superlattice' multicomponent nanoparticle arrays where the arrangement of particles is driven by the shape of the tiny building blocks. The method uses linker molecules made of complementary strands of DNA to overcome the blocks' tendency to pack together in a way that would separate differently shaped components.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Apr-2015
Relativistic heavy ion collider smashes record for polarized proton luminosity
Thanks to accelerator advances, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, a powerful nuclear physics research facility at the US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory, just shattered its own record for producing polarized proton collisions at 200-giga-electron-volt collision energy. The improvement will generate high volumes of data rapidly, giving physicists time to achieve several high-priority science goals in a single run at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Mar-2015
Applied Physics Letters
First scientific publication from data collected at NSLS-II
Just weeks after NSLS-II achieved first light, a team of scientists at the X-Ray Powder Diffraction beamline tested a setup that yielded data on thermoelectric materials and resulted in science published in Applied Physics Letters - Materials.
Department of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences

Contact: Chelsea Whyte
cwhyte@bnl.gov
631-344-8671
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Jan-2015
Science
New clues about a brain protein with high affinity for Valium
Valium, one of the best known antianxiety drugs, produces its calming effects by binding with a particular protein in the brain. But the drug has an almost equally strong affinity for a completely different protein. New studies revealing atomic level details of this secondary interaction might offer clues about Valium's side effects and point the way to more effective drugs.
National Institutes of Health, New York Structural Biology Center, DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Jan-2015
Nature Communications
Nanoscale mirrored cavities amplify, connect quantum memories
Constructing tiny 'mirrors' to trap light increases the efficiency with which photons can pick up and transmit information about electronic spin states -- which is essential for scaling up quantum memories for functional quantum computing systems and networks.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research, DOE/Office of Science, Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, NASA/Office of the Chief Technologist's Space Technology Research Fellowship, National Science Foundation

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Jan-2015
Nature Communications
Self-assembled nanotextures create antireflective surface on silicon solar cells
Scientists at Brookhaven National Laboratory show that etching a nanoscale texture onto silicon creates an antireflective surface that works as well as state-of-the-art thin-film multilayer antireflective coatings for solar cells.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 19-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Self-destructive effects of magnetically-doped ferromagnetic topological insulators
A new atomic-scale study of the surface properties of certain ferromagnetic topological insulators reveals that these materials exhibit extreme, unexpected, and self-destructive electronic disorder.
US Department of Energy, Institute of Basic Science of Korea

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 12-Jan-2015
Nature Materials
Solar cell polymers with multiplied electrical output
A team from Brookhaven Lab and Columbia University has paired up photovoltaic polymers that produce two units of electricity per unit of light instead of the usual one on a single molecular polymer chain. Having the two charges on the same molecule means the light-absorbing, energy-producing materials work efficiently when dissolved in liquids, which opens the way for a wide range of industrial scale manufacturing processes, including 'printing' solar-energy-producing material like ink.
US Department of Energy Office of Science, National Science Foundation, 3M

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Jan-2015
Science
Compact batteries enhanced by spontaneous silver matrix formations
The formation of a highly conductive silver matrix inside an otherwise poorly performing battery enhances its efficiency and offers new potential applications. Scientists used x-rays to see where, when, and how these nanoscale 'bridges' emerge and develop new material designs and optimization techniques.
US Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences

Contact: Justin Eure
jeure@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Microscopy reveals how atom-high steps impede oxidation of metal surfaces
A new study reveals that certain features of metal surfaces can stop the process of oxidation in its tracks. The findings could be relevant to understanding and perhaps controlling oxidation in a wide range of materials -- from catalysts to the superalloys used in jet engine turbines and the oxides in microelectronics.
DOE Office of Science

Contact: Justin Eure
jeure@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
Nature Communications
Unusual electronic state found in new class of unconventional superconductors
Scientists have discovered an unusual form of electronic order in a new family of unconventional superconductors, giving scientists a new group of materials to explore to understand ability to carry current with no energy loss.
Department of Energy Office of Science, US National Science Foundation, Japan Society of the Promotion of Science, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Friends of Todai Inc.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Genes and Development
Key moment mapped in assembly of DNA-splitting molecular machine
Scientists reveal crucial steps and surprising structures in the genesis of the enzyme that divides the DNA double helix during cell replication.
National Institutes of Health, United Kingdom Medical Research Council

Contact: Justin Eure
jeure@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 7-Oct-2014
The Plant Cell
Researchers pump up oil accumulation in plant leaves
A series of detailed genetic studies points scientists to a new way to dramatically increase the accumulation of oil in plant leaves, an abundant source of biomass for fuel production.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 1-Oct-2014
Physical Review Letters
Hide and seek: Sterile neutrinos remain elusive
The Daya Bay Collaboration, an international group of scientists studying the subtle transformations of subatomic particles called neutrinos, is publishing its first results on the search for a so-called sterile neutrino, a possible new type of neutrino beyond the three known neutrino 'flavors,' or types. The existence of this elusive particle, if proven, would have a profound impact on our understanding of the universe, and could impact the design of future neutrino experiments.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Sep-2014
New NIH/DOE grant for life science studies at NSLS-II
A new grant just awarded by the National Institutes of Health and the US Department of Energy will fund the operation of a suite of powerful experimental tools for Life Sciences research at DOE's Brookhaven National Laboratory.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, US Department of Energy

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Elusive quantum transformations found near absolute zero
Scientists mapped quantum phase transitions at temperatures colder than interstellar space. The ultra-cold conditions isolated the fluctuations that define the electronic, magnetic, and thermodynamic performance of metallic materials. The research provides new methods to identify and understand materials with powerful and unexpected properties, including superconductivity.
U.S. Department of Energy

Contact: Justin Eure
jeure@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 19-Aug-2014
Physical Review Letters
First indirect evidence of so-far undetected strange baryons
New supercomputing calculations provide the first evidence that particles predicted by the theory of quark-gluon interactions but never before observed are being produced in heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider.
Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing program of the DOE Office of Science (Nuclear Physics and Advanced Scientific Computing Research), Federal Ministry of Education and Research of Germany, German Research Foundation

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Nature Communications
Promising ferroelectric materials suffer from unexpected electric polarizations
Brookhaven Lab scientists find surprising locked charge polarizations that explain the poor performance of next-gen materials that would otherwise revolutionize data-driven devices.
US Department of Energy's Office of Science

Contact: Justin Eure
jeure@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Showing releases 1-25 out of 27.

1 | 2 > >>

 

 

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