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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 29.

1 | 2 > >>

Public Release: 8-Feb-2016
Nature Structural & Molecular Biology
Scientists propose 'pumpjack' mechanism for splitting and copying DNA
New close-up images of the proteins that copy DNA inside the nucleus of a cell have led a team of scientists to propose a brand new mechanism for how this molecular machinery works. The scientists studied proteins from yeast cells, which share many features with the cells of complex organisms such as humans, and could offer new insight into ways that DNA replication can go awry.
National Institutes of Health, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Brookhaven Lab Biology Department

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Feb-2016
Nature Physics
Chiral magnetic effect generates quantum current
Scientists at the US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory and Stony Brook University have discovered a new way to generate very low-resistance electric current in a new class of materials. The discovery, which relies on the separation of right- and left-"handed" particles, points to a range of potential applications in energy, quantum computing, and medical imaging, and possibly even a new mechanism for inducing superconductivity-the ability of some materials to carry current with no energy loss.
DOE Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Feb-2016
Science
Scientists guide gold nanoparticles to form 'diamond' superlattices
Using bundled strands of DNA to build Tinkertoy-like tetrahedral cages, scientists have devised a way to trap and arrange nanoparticles in a way that mimics the crystalline structure of diamond. The achievement of this complex yet elegant arrangement may open a path to new materials that take advantage of the optical and mechanical properties of this crystalline structure for applications such as optical transistors, color-changing materials, and lightweight yet tough materials.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Jan-2016
Physical Review Letters
New theory of secondary inflation expands options for avoiding an excess of dark matter
A new theory from physicists at the US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, and Stony Brook University, which will publish online on Jan. 18 in Physical Review Letters, suggests a shorter secondary inflationary period that could account for the amount of dark matter estimated to exist throughout the cosmos.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Chelsea Whyte
cwhyte@bnl.gov
631-344-8671
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Jan-2016
Nature Energy
Unique 2-level cathode structure improves battery performance
A team of scientists from the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory say they've found a way to make a battery cathode with a hierarchical structure where the reactive material is abundant yet protected -- key points for high capacity and long battery life.
DOE/Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Vehicle Technologies Office, DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Jan-2016
Physical Review Letters
Beam-beam compensation scheme doubles proton-proton collision rates at RHIC
Accelerator physicists at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory have successfully implemented an innovative scheme for increasing proton collision rates at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. More proton collisions produce more data for scientists to sift through to answer important nuclear physics questions, including the search for the source of proton spin.
DOE/Office of Science, US LHC Accelerator Research Program

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 7-Dec-2015
Physical Review Letters
RHIC particle smashups find that shape matters
Peering into the seething soup of primordial matter created in particle collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) -- an 'atom smasher' at Brookhaven National Laboratory -- scientists have come to a new understanding of how particles are produced in these collisions. This understanding represents a paradigm shift consistent with the presence of a saturated state of gluons, super-dense fields of the glue-like particles that bind the building blocks of ordinary matter.
DOE Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 7-Dec-2015
Scientific Reports
New clues for battling botulism
Scientists have discovered new details about how 'cloaking' proteins protect the toxin that causes botulism, a fatal disease caused most commonly by consuming improperly canned foods. That knowledge and the cloaking proteins themselves might now be turned against the toxin -- the deadliest known to humankind.
Defense Threat Reduction Agency, National Institutes of Health, DOE Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Nov-2015
Physical Review Letters
Supercomputing the strange difference between matter and antimatter
An international team of physicists including theorists from the US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory has published the first calculation of direct 'CP' symmetry violation -- how the behavior of subatomic particles (in this case, the decay of kaons) differs when matter is swapped out for antimatter.
US Department of Energy Office of Science, RIKEN, Science and Technology Facilities Council

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 19-Nov-2015
Brookhaven Lab wins two R&D 100 awards
Two technologies developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory have received 2015 R&D 100 awards, which honor the top 100 proven technological advances of the past year as determined by a panel selected by R&D Magazine.

Contact: Kay Cordtz
kcordtz@bnl.gov
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Nov-2015
Physical Review Letters
Quantum spin could create unstoppable, one-dimensional electron waves
Scientists from Brookhaven National Laboratory and Ludwig Maximilian University have proposed a solution to the subatomic stoppage of electron flow due to defects in materials: a novel way to create a more robust electron wave by binding together the electron's direction of movement and its spin.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Nov-2015
Nature
Physicists measure force that makes antimatter stick together
Peering at the debris from particle collisions that recreate the conditions of the very early universe, scientists have for the first time measured the force of interaction between pairs of antiprotons. Like the force that holds ordinary protons together within the nuclei of atoms, the force between antiprotons is attractive and strong. The experiments were conducted at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory and will publish in Nature.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 2-Nov-2015
Nature Structural & Molecular Biology
First complete pictures of cells' DNA-copying machinery
The first-ever images of the protein complex that unwinds, splits, and copies double-stranded DNA reveal something rather different from the standard textbook view. The electron microscope images, created by scientists at the US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory with partners from Stony Brook University and Rockefeller University, offer new insight into how this molecular machinery functions.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Oct-2015
Nature Physics
Unraveling the complex, intertwined electron phases in a superconductor
A team led by researchers from Brookhaven Lab and Cornell has characterized a key arrangement of electrons that may impede superconductivity in cuprates. Understanding this 'electron density wave' may lead to ways to suppress or remove it to induce superconductivity, possibly even at room temperature.
DOE Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 5-Oct-2015
Angewandte Chemie International Edition
Flipping molecular attachments amps up activity of CO2 catalyst
New research by chemists at Brookhaven Lab offers clues that could help scientists design more effective catalysts for transforming carbon dioxide to useful products. The study reveals how a simple rearrangement of molecular attachments on an iridium hydride catalyst can greatly improve its ability to coax notoriously stable CO2 molecules to react.
DOE Office of Science, Japan Science and Technology Agency

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 1-Oct-2015
Quark Matter 2015
Scientists present, discuss latest data from experiments smashing nuclei
Scientists intent on unraveling the mystery of the force that binds the building blocks of visible matter are gathered in Kobe, Japan, this week to present and discuss the latest results from smashups of nuclei at the world's premier particle colliders -- the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and the Large Hadron Collider.
DOE Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Sep-2015
Physics Review Letters
Best precision yet for neutrino measurements at Daya Bay
Today, the international Daya Bay Collaboration announces new findings on the measurements of neutrinos, paving the way forward for further neutrino research, and confirming that the Daya Bay neutrino experiment continues to be one to watch.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 31-Aug-2015
Physical Review Letters
Tiny drops of early universe 'perfect' fluid
New data from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider confirm that small nuclei can create tiny droplets of a perfect liquid primordial soup when they collide with larger nuclei.
DOE Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 5-Aug-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Two spin liquids square off in an iron-based superconductor
A study conducted by researchers at Brookhaven and Oak Ridge national laboratories describes how an iron-telluride material related to a family of high-temperature superconductors develops superconductivity with no long-range electronic or magnetic order. In fact, the material displays a liquid-like magnetic state consisting of two coexisting and competing disordered magnetic phases. The results challenge a number of widely accepted paradigms into how unconventional superconductors work.
DOE Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Jul-2015
Journal of Chemical Physics
New computer model could explain how simple molecules took first step toward life
Sergei Maslov, a computational biologist at the US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory and adjunct professor at Stony Brook University, and Alexei Tkachenko, a scientist at Brookhaven's Center for Functional Nanomaterials, have developed a model that explains how simple monomers could rapidly make the jump to more complex self-replicating polymers. What their model points to could have intriguing implications for the origins of life on Earth and CFN's work in engineering artificial self-assembly at the nanoscale.
DOE Office of Science

Contact: Peter Genzer
genzer@bnl.gov
631-344-3174
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Jun-2015
Nature Communications
X-rays and electrons join forces to map catalytic reactions in real-time
A new technique pioneered at Brookhaven Lab reveals atomic-scale changes during catalytic reactions in real time and under real operating conditions.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Justin Eure
jeure@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Jun-2015
Nature Communications
Sweeping lasers snap together nanoscale geometric grids
New technique developed by Brookhaven Lab scientists to rapidly create multi-layered, self-assembled grids could transform the manufacture of high-tech coatings for anti-reflective surfaces, improved solar cells, and touchscreen electronics.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Justin Eure
jeure@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Jun-2015
Physics Review Letters
Scientists see ripples of a particle-separating wave in primordial plasma
Scientists in the STAR collaboration at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, a particle accelerator exploring nuclear physics and the building blocks of matter at the US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory, have new evidence for what's called a 'chiral magnetic wave' rippling through the soup of quark-gluon plasma created in RHIC's energetic particle smashups.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 25-May-2015
Nature Materials
Engineering phase changes in nanoparticle arrays
Scientists at the US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory have just taken a big step toward the goal of engineering dynamic nanomaterials whose structure and associated properties can be switched on demand. In a paper appearing in Nature Materials, they describe a way to selectively rearrange the nanoparticles in three-dimensional arrays to produce different configurations, or phases, from the same nano-components.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 25-May-2015
Nature Nanotechnology
DNA double helix does double duty in assembling arrays of nanoparticles
In a new twist on the use of DNA in nanoscale construction, scientists at the US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory and collaborators put synthetic strands of the biological material to work in two ways: They used ropelike configurations of the DNA double helix to form a rigid geometrical framework, and added dangling pieces of single-stranded DNA to glue nanoparticles in place.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Showing releases 1-25 out of 29.

1 | 2 > >>

 

 

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