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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-22 out of 22.

Public Release: 19-May-2016
Journal of Orthopaedic Research
New research could personalize medicine for arthritis patients
Recently, a team of scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, University of California, Davis, University of California, Merced and Regeneron Pharmaceuticals examined the whole-joint gene expression by RNA sequencing at one day, one, six and 12 weeks after injury. The team used a new, non-invasive tibial compression mouse model of PTOA, that mimics ACL rupture in humans from a single high-impact injury.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 10-May-2016
These space rocks could save the planet
The planetary defense team at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory -- part of an international collaboration to detect and deflect the next large Earth-bound object -- is preparing meteorites received from NASA to be vaporized by a high-powered laser. The data they yield will inform asteroid deflection models.

Contact: Nolan O'Brien
obrien32@llnl.gov
925-422-3399
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 27-Apr-2016
Scientific Reports
3-D printed foam outperforms traditional cellular materials in long-term stress
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory material scientists have found that 3-D printed foam works better than standard cellular materials in terms of durability and long-term mechanical performance.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 19-Apr-2016
Americans use less energy in 2015 according to Lawrence Livermore analysis
Americans used less energy overall in 2015 than the previous year, according to the most recent energy flow charts released by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 7-Apr-2016
Science
Climate models underestimate global warming by exaggerating cloud brightening
Researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Yale University have found that climate models are aggressively making clouds 'brighter' as the planet warms. This may be causing models to underestimate how much global warming will occur due to increasing carbon dioxide. The research appears in the April 8 edition of Science.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Apr-2016
Nature Nanotechnology
Tiny tubes move into the fast lane
For the first time, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researchers have shown that carbon nanotubes as small as eight-tenths of a nanometer in diameter can transport protons faster than bulk water, by an order of magnitude.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Mar-2016
Journal of Materials Chemistry A
Pumping up energy storage with metal oxides
Material scientists at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have found certain metal oxides increase capacity and improve cycling performance in lithium-ion batteries.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Mar-2016
Scientific Reports
New explosion gas-signature models can help inspectors locate and identify underground nuclear tests
Through experiments and computer models of gas releases, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory scientists have simulated signatures of gases from underground nuclear explosions (UNEs) that may be carried by winds far from the detonation.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Mar-2016
Nature Communications
Shock compression research shows hexagonal diamond could serve as meteor impact marker
In 1967, a hexagonal form of diamond, later named lonsdaleite, was identified for the first time inside fragments of the Canyon Diablo meteorite, the asteroid that created the Barringer Crater in Arizona.

Contact: Breanna Bishop
bishop33@llnl.gov
925-423-9802
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Feb-2016
Nature Climate Change
Carbon emissions affect thousands of years of climate change
The Earth may suffer irreversible damage that could last tens of thousands of years because of the rate humans are emitting carbon into the atmosphere. In a new study in Nature Climate Change, researchers at Oregon State University, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and collaborating institutions found that the longer-term impacts of climate change go well past the 21st century.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 19-Jan-2016
Nature Climate Change
Livermore scientists find global ocean warming has doubled in recent decades
Lawrence Livermore scientists, working with National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and university colleagues, have found that half of the global ocean heat content increase since 1865 has occurred over the past two decades.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Jan-2016
Lab researcher helps team that may have a key solution to reducing carbon dioxide emissions
Meeting the Paris Climate Agreement goal of limiting the increase in the global average temperature to well below two degrees Celsius compared to pre-industrial levels will require increased use of renewable energy and reducing the CO2 intensity of fossil energy use.

Contact: Jeremy Thomas
thomas244@llnl.gov
925-422-5539
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Dec-2015
Nature
Models overestimate rainfall increases due to climate change
Lawrence Livermore researchers and collaborators have found that most climate models overestimate the increase in global precipitation due to climate change.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Dec-2015
Livermore Lab researchers use 3-D printing to build human physiology outside the body
The cardiovascular system is a complex web of tens of thousands of miles of arteries, capillaries and veins, branching throughout the body like tributaries of a great river. And now, researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are recapitulating this intricate network using an emerging technology: 3-D bioprinting.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Nov-2015
PLOS ONE
Scientists find bone protein inhibits prostate cancer invasion
Scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in collaboration with researchers from University of California campuses at Merced and Davis have found that a secreted protein predominantly expressed in bone inhibits prostate cancer metastasis to bone.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 5-Nov-2015
Scientific Reports
Using hydrogen to enhance lithium ion batteries
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory scientists have found that lithium ion batteries operate longer and faster when their electrodes are treated with hydrogen.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Oct-2015
It's solid: Storing hydrogen in a new form
As part of a tri-lab consortium, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researchers will develop tools and understanding necessary for designing new solid-state materials for storing hydrogen gas.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Sep-2015
Physical Review Letters
New theory of stealth dark matter may explain universe's missing mass
Lawrence Livermore scientists have come up with a new theory that may identify why dark matter has evaded direct detection in Earth-based experiments.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Sep-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
A new view of the content of Earth's core
There is more oxygen in the core of Earth than originally thought. Lawrence Livermore geologist Rick Ryerson and international colleagues discovered some new findings about Earth's core and mantle by considering their geophysical and geochemical signatures together.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Sep-2015
Journal of Physical Chemistry
Nanoelectronics could get a boost from carbon research
Lawrence Livermore scientists have investigated a way to create linear chains of carbon atoms from laser-melted graphite. The material, called carbyne, could have a number of novel properties, including the ability to adjust the amount of electrical current traveling through a circuit, depending on the user's needs.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Sep-2015
Lawrence Livermore National Lab to explore spectral imaging to detect moisture in solar cells
Over the next two years, Mihail Bora, a Materials Engineering Division research team member at the Lab, will try to prove that spectral imaging can be used to evaluate the moisture content of PV modules and to create two-dimensional maps and models of water concentration. Bora will then use these results as a screening tool to help protect the modules from water damage. Water ingress can cause corrosion of metal parts, delamination and decrease the efficiency of solar cells.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Jeremy Thomas
thomas244@llnl.gov
925-422-5539
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Aug-2015
Science
Lawrence Livermore scientists discover new young planet
For the first time, Lawrence Livermore scientists as part of an international team, have discovered the most Jupiter-like planet ever seen in a young star system, lending clues to understanding how planets formed around our sun.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Showing releases 1-22 out of 22.

 

 

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