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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 101-125 out of 206.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 > >>

Public Release: 28-Apr-2014
Nature Scientific Reports
A glassy look for manganites
Researchers at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source discovered a glass-like re-ordering of electron-spin states as manganite crystals recovered from a photo-excited conductor state back to an insulator state. The discovery holds promise for future ultrafast electronic switching and memory devices.
US DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Apr-2014
Nature Communications
Ames Lab researchers see rare-earth-like magnetic properties in iron
Scientists at the Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory have observed magnetic properties typically associated with those observed in rare-earth elements in iron. These properties are observed in a new iron based compound that does not contain rare earth elements, when the iron atom is positioned between two nitrogen atoms. The discovery opens the possibility of using iron to provide both the magnetism and permanence in high-strength permanent magnets, like those used in direct-drive wind turbines or electric motors in hybrid cars.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Breehan Gerleman Lucchesi
breehan@ameslab.gov
515-294-9750
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
Journal of the American Chemical Society
'Double-duty' electrolyte enables new chemistry for longer-lived batteries
Researchers have developed a new and unconventional battery chemistry aimed at producing batteries that last longer than previously thought possible.

Contact: Morgan McCorkle
mccorkleml@ornl.gov
865-574-7308
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
How a plant beckons the bacteria that will do it harm
A common plant puts out a welcome mat to bacteria seeking to invade, and scientists have discovered the mat's molecular mix. The team showed that the humble and oft-studied plant Arabidopsis puts out a molecular signal that invites an attack from a pathogen. The study reveals new targets during the battle between microbe, which often infects tomatoes, and host that researchers can exploit to protect plants.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
Physical Review Letters
Atomic switcheroo explains origins of thin-film solar cell mystery
Treating cadmium-telluride solar cell materials with cadmium-chloride improves their efficiency, but researchers have not fully understood why.

Contact: Morgan McCorkle
mccorkleml@ornl.gov
865-574-7308
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
Angewandte Chemie International Edition
Halving hydrogen
Like a hungry diner ripping open a dinner roll, a fuel cell catalyst that converts hydrogen into electricity must tear open a hydrogen molecule. Now researchers have captured a view of such a catalyst holding onto the two halves of its hydrogen feast. The view confirms previous hypotheses and provides insight into how to make the catalyst work better for alternative energy uses, researchers reported in Angewandte Chemie International Edition.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Nano Letters
First size-based chromatography technique for the study of living cells
Using nanodot technology, Berkeley Lab researchers demonstrated the first size-based form of chromatography for studying the membranes of living cells. This unique physical approach to probing cellular membrane structures reveals critical information that can't be obtained through conventional microscopy.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters
NREL unlocking secrets of new solar material
A new solar material that has the same crystal structure as a mineral first found in the Ural Mountains in 1839 is shooting up the efficiency charts faster than almost anything researchers have seen before -- and it is generating optimism that a less expensive way of using sunlight to generate electricity may be in our planet's future.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Energy Secretary Moniz announces 2013 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award Winners
Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz today announced six exceptional scientists and engineers as recipients of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award for their contributions in research and development that supports the Energy Department's science, energy and national security missions. The Lawrence Award recognizes US mid-career scientists and engineers.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Jeff Sherwood
jeff.sherwood@hq.doe.gov
202-586-4940
DOE/US Department of Energy

Public Release: 21-Apr-2014
Airport security officers at TSA gaining insight from Sandia human behavior studies
A recent Sandia National Laboratories study offers insight into how a federal transportation security officer's thought process can influence decisions made during airport baggage screening, findings that are helping the Transportation Security Administration improve the performance of its security officers.
US Transportation Security Administration

Contact: Mike Janes
mejanes@sandia.gov
925-294-2447
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Science
Lab researcher discovers the green in Greenland
An international team of researchers, including a scientist from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, has discovered that ancient dirt in Greenland was cryogenically frozen for millions of years under nearly two miles of ice.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Pocket-sized anthrax detector aids global agriculture
A credit-card-sized anthrax detection cartridge developed at Sandia National Laboratories and recently licensed to a small business makes testing safer, easier, faster and cheaper.

Contact: Stephanie Holinka
slholin@sandia.gov
505-284-9227
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Physical Review Letters
Scientists capture ultrafast snapshots of light-driven superconductivity
A new study pins down a major factor behind the appearance of superconductivity -- the ability to conduct electricity with 100 percent efficiency -- in a promising copper-oxide material.
DOE's Office of Science, Stanford University, University of Hamburg

Contact: Justin Eure
jeure@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Los Alamos physicist honored with E.O. Lawrence Award
Los Alamos National Laboratory physicist John Sarrao is being honored by the US Department of Energy with the 2013 Ernest O. Lawrence Award in Condensed Matter and Materials Sciences.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Journal of Environmental Quality
Significant baseline levels of arsenic found in Ohio soils are due to natural processes
Geologic and soil processes are to blame for significant baseline levels of arsenic in soil throughout Ohio, according to a new study. The findings pose a challenge for regulators, who must determine what levels should trigger action when natural arsenic levels everywhere are above suggested screening standards.
Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geological Survey, US Geological Survey

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Berkeley Lab's Adam Arkin wins 2013 Lawrence Award
Adam Arkin, director of Berkeley Lab's Physical Biosciences Division, has been named one of six recipients of the 2013 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award by US Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Lynn Yarris
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Nano Letters
Relieving electric vehicle range anxiety with improved batteries
A new, PNNL-developed nanomaterial called a metal organic framework could extend the lifespan of lithium-sulfur batteries, which could be used to increase the driving range of electric vehicles.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Franny White
franny.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Low-cost, hydrogen-powered forklifts with rapid refueling, zero emissions coming soon
Zero-emission hydrogen fuel cell systems soon could be powering the forklifts used in warehouses and other industrial settings at lower costs and with faster refueling times than ever before, courtesy of a partnership between Sandia National Laboratories and Hawaii Hydrogen Carriers. The goal of the project is to design a solid-state hydrogen storage system that can refuel at low pressure four to five times faster than it takes to charge a battery-powered forklift.
DOE/Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

Contact: Mike Janes
mejanes@sandia.gov
925-294-2447
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
Fisheries
Making dams safer for fish around the world
The pressure changes that many fish experience when they travel through the turbulent waters near a dam can seriously injure or kill the fish. Scientists from around the world, including areas like Southeast Asia and Brazil where huge dams are planned or under construction, are working together to protect fish from the phenomenon, known as barotrauma.
US Army Corps of Engineers, US Department of Energy

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
Beam on target!
Late on April 1, the crown jewel of the Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility sparkled its way into a new era. Following an upgrade of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, the CEBAF accelerator delivered the highest-energy electron beams it has ever produced into a target in an experimental hall, recording the first data of the 12 GeV era.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Kandice Carter
kcarter@jlab.org
757-269-7263
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
Nature Photonics
Shiny quantum dots brighten future of solar cells
A house window that doubles as a solar panel could be on the horizon, thanks to recent quantum-dot work by Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers in collaboration with scientists from University of Milano-Bicocca, Italy. Their project demonstrates that superior light-emitting properties of quantum dots can be applied in solar energy by helping more efficiently harvest sunlight.
DOE Office of Science

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
Anasys licenses ORNL nanoscale mass spectrometry imaging technology
Anasys Instruments Corp. has licensed a technology that allows for simultaneous chemical and physical characterization and could lead to advances in materials and drug development.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-1946
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Apr-2014
Two Ames Laboratory science interns are awarded prestigious scholarships
Two participants in the US Department of Energy Office of Science's Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship research program at the DOE's Ames Laboratory have been awarded prestigious scholarships, one from the Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship and Excellence in Education Program and the other from the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship program.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Apr-2014
Soukoulis wins 2014 Max Born Award
Costas Soukoulis, senior scientist at the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory, Distinguished Professor of Physics and Astronomy at Iowa State University and associated member of IESL-FORTH in Greece, has won the 2014 Max Born Award from the Optical Society of America. The award honors a scientist who has made outstanding contributions to the scientific field of physical optics.

Contact: Breehan Gerleman Lucchesi
breehan@ameslab.gov
515-294-9750
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Apr-2014
Princeton, PPPL join major arms-control project
Princeton University and the Princeton Plasma Physics Physics Laboratory have joined a $25 million consortium to address technology and policy issues related to arms control.
National Nuclear Security Administration

Contact: John Greenwald
609-243-2672
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Showing releases 101-125 out of 206.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 > >>

 

 

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