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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 101-125 out of 200.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 > >>

Public Release: 28-Jan-2014
NREL study: Active power control of wind turbines can improve power grid reliability
The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory, along with partners from the Electric Power Research Institute and the University of Colorado have completed a comprehensive study to understand how wind power technology can assist the power grid by controlling the active power output being placed onto the system. The rest of the power system's resources have traditionally been adjusted around wind to support a reliable and efficient system. The research that led to this report challenges that concept.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 27-Jan-2014
Physical Review Letters
ORNL study advances quest for better superconducting materials
Nearly 30 years after the discovery of high-temperature superconductivity, many questions remain, but an Oak Ridge National Laboratory team is providing insight that could lead to better superconductors.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Jan-2014
Nature Communications
Cooling microprocessors with carbon nanotubes
Berkeley Lab researchers at the Molecular Foundry have developed a "process friendly" technique to enable the cooling of microprocessor chips through the use of carbon nanotubes.
US Department of Energy Office of Science, Intel Corporation

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Jan-2014
Small Satellites
Lawrence Livermore 'space cops' to help control traffic in space
A team of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory scientists are using mini-satellites that work as "space cops" to help control traffic in space.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Jan-2014
Energy and Building
White, green or black roofs? Berkeley Lab report compares economic payoffs
Looking strictly at the economic costs and benefits of three different roof types -- black, white and "green" (or vegetated) -- Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory researchers have found in a new study that white roofs are the most cost-effective over a 50-year time span. While the high installation cost of green roofs sets them back in economic terms, their environmental and amenity benefits may at least partially mitigate their financial burden.

Contact: Julie Chao
jhchao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
E-whiskers
Researchers with Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley have created e-whiskers -- highly sensitive tactile sensors made from carbon nanotubes and silver nanoparticles that should have a wide range of applications including advanced robotics, human-machine interfaces, and biological and environmental sensors.
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Jan-2014
NREL working to clean air in fracking process
A microbe capable of digesting methane could save countless tons of greenhouse gas from reaching the atmosphere during the hydraulic fracturing process. Hydraulic fracturing, also known as fracking, uses pressurized water to fracture rock to release natural gas. It's been a boon to local economies and a source of inexpensive fuels -- but if nothing is done to capture the byproduct methane, which is typically flared in the air, it can also contribute heftily to greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Jan-2014
NREL model licensed to improve accuracy of battery simulations
The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory has licensed its Equivalent Circuit Battery Model to software developer ThermoAnalytics for use in its recently updated RadTherm software package.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Jan-2014
Nature Communications
Highly efficient broadband terahertz radiation from metamaterials
Scientists at the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory have demonstrated broadband terahertz wave generation using metamaterials. The discovery may help develop noninvasive imaging and sensing, and make possible terahertz-speed information communication, processing and storage.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Breehan Gerleman Lucchesi
breehan@ameslab.gov
515-294-9750
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Jan-2014
Science
Natural 3-D counterpart to graphene discovered
A natural 3-D counterpart to 2-D graphene with similar or even better electron mobility and velocity has been discovered at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source. This discovery promises exciting new things to come for the high-tech industry, including much faster transistors and far more compact hard drives.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Jan-2014
Berkeley Lab-led project aims to produce liquid transportation fuel from methane
How's this for innovative: A Berkeley Lab-led team hopes to engineer a new enzyme that efficiently converts methane to liquid transportation fuel. "There's a lot of methane available, and we want to develop a new way to harness it as an energy source for vehicles," says Christer Jansson, a biochemist in Berkeley Lab's Earth Sciences Division who heads the effort.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Hugging hemes help electrons hop
Researchers simulating how certain bacteria run electrical current through tiny molecular wires have discovered a secret Nature uses for electron travel. This is the first time scientists have seen this evolutionary design principle for electron transport.
US Department of Energy, Royal Society

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Jan-2014
LLNL partnership with Calysta works to convert natural gas to liquid fuel
In an effort to put to good use natural gas (methane) that might otherwise become pollution, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is collaborating with start-up company Calysta Energy on a new technology to convert natural gas to liquid fuel.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Jan-2014
Europhysics Letters
A deeper look at interfaces
A technique developed at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source makes it possible for the first time to selectively study the electronic structure of buried interfaces in multilayer nanodevices. The technique is called Standing Wave Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Jan-2014
Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics
Argonne scientists discover new pathway for artificial photosynthesis
Currently, the most efficient methods that we have of making fuel -- principally hydrogen -- from sunlight and water involve rare and expensive metal catalysts, like platinum. In a new study, researchers at the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory have found a new, more efficient way to link a less expensive synthetic cobalt-containing catalyst to an organic light-sensitive molecule, called a chromophore.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Jan-2014
Andrew Sessler wins Fermi Award
President Obama has named Andrew Sessler, award-winning theoretical physicist, acclaimed humanitarian, and former director of Berkeley Lab, as a recipient of the Enrico Fermi Award, the government's oldest and most prestigious prizes for scientific achievement.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Jan-2014
Science
ORNL-UT researchers invent 'sideways' approach to 2-D hybrid
Researchers have pioneered a new technique for forming a two-dimensional, single-atom sheet of two different materials with a seamless boundary.

Contact: Morgan McCorkle
mccorkleml@ornl.gov
865-574-7308
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Jan-2014
Nature Communications
Battery development may extend range of electric cars
Electric cars could travel farther on a single charge and more renewable energy could be saved for a rainy day if lithium-sulfur batteries can last longer. PNNL has developed a novel anode that could quadruple the lifespan of these promising batteries.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Franny White
franny.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Jan-2014
Physical Review Letters
Fusion instabilities lessened by unexpected effect
Introducition of a secondary, weaker magnetic field into a fusion experiment at Sandia's Z machine unexpectedly reduced the plasma disturbance that customarily sinks fusion efforts.
National Nuclear Security Administratoin

Contact: Neal Singer
nsinger@sandia.gov
505-845-7078
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 8-Jan-2014
223rd AAS Annual Meeting
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
BOSS measures the universe to 1-percent accuracy
The Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), led by scientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, is the largest component of the third Sloan Digital Sky Survey. BOSS has measured the clustering of nearly 1.3 million galaxies spectroscopically, determining the "standard ruler" of the universe's large-scale structure to within one percent. This is the most precise such measurement ever made and likely to be the standard for years to come.
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, Participating Institutions, National Science Foundation, Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Paul Preuss
paul_preuss@lbl.gov
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 7-Jan-2014
223rd AAS Annual Meeting
Out-of-this-world first light images emerge from Gemini Planet Imager
After nearly a decade of development, construction and testing, the world's most advanced instrument for directly imaging and analyzing planets orbiting around other stars is pointing skyward and collecting light from distant worlds.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 7-Jan-2014
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, January 2014
This release focuses on: "The road to efficiency"; "Zero Energy Ready Homes"; and "Cross-disciplinary research is yielding new insight into the carbon cycle, contaminated soils and soil fertility."

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 7-Jan-2014
NREL expert honored for energy systems innovations
The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory recently won several prestigious awards, including honors for innovations in window air-conditioning efficiency, data sharing, and its energy-efficient computer data center.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 7-Jan-2014
Science
NREL finds a new cellulose digestion mechanism by a fast-eating enzyme
Researchers at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory have discovered that an enzyme from a microorganism first found in the Valley of Geysers on the Kamchatka Peninsula in Russia in 1990 can digest cellulose almost twice as fast as the current leading component cellulase enzyme on the market.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Dec-2013
Nano Letters
Batteries as they are meant to be seen
Researchers have developed a way to microscopically view battery electrodes while they are bathed in wet electrolytes, mimicking realistic conditions inside actual batteries.
Department of Energy

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Showing releases 101-125 out of 200.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 > >>

 

 

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