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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 126-150 out of 201.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 > >>

Public Release: 12-May-2014
Three Brookhaven physicists receive DOE Early Career Research Program funding
Three physicists at Brookhaven Lab are among 35 scientists selected by DOE's Office of Science to receive Early Career Research Program funding. Their work spans several subfields of physics -- from describing the dynamics of high-energy collisions of atomic nuclei at particle colliders, to exploring magnetic excitations in materials that offer promise for carrying loss-free electric current, to developing new ways to track elusive neutrinos.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 12-May-2014
Cell
All in the rotation
Berkeley Lab researchers have shed new light on a type of molecular motor used to package the DNA of a number of viruses, including herpes and the adenoviruses. Their findings could help in the development of more effective drugs and inspire the design of new and improved synthetic biomotors.
National Institutes of Health, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 9-May-2014
Journal of Biological Chemistry
Plants' oil-desaturating enzymes pair up to channel metabolites
Plant scientists find fatty acid desaturating enzymes link up to pass intermediate products from one enzyme to another. Engineering these enzyme interactions could be a new approach for tailoring plants to produce useful products.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 9-May-2014
Nature Communications
Salt needed: Tolerance lessons from a dead sea fungus
Some organisms thrive in salty environments by lying dormant when salt concentrations are very high. Other organisms need salt to grow. In the May 9, 2014 issue of Nature Communications, a team including DOE Joint Genome Institute researchers described the genome of a Dead Sea fungus. Understanding how organisms adapt to extremely salty environments could help improve salt tolerance in crops, laying the groundwork of understanding necessary to grow them in desert and saline environments.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
925-927-2541
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 8-May-2014
35 scientists receive early career research program funding
The Department of Energy's Office of Science has selected 35 scientists from across the nation -- including 17 from DOE's national laboratories and 18 from US universities -- to receive significant funding for research as part of DOE's Early Career Research Program.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Charles Rousseaux
charles.rousseaux@science.doe.gov
DOE/US Department of Energy

Public Release: 8-May-2014
Science
Scientists find solution to 2 long-standing mysteries of cuprate superconductivity
Detailed studies of a material as it transforms from an insulator through the 'pseudogap' into a full-blown superconductor links two 'personality' changes of electrons at a critical point.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 7-May-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Berkeley Lab develops nanoscope to probe chemistry on the molecular scale
By combining atomic force microscopy with infrared synchrotron light, researchers from Berkeley Lab and the University of Colorado have improved the spatial resolution of infrared spectroscopy by orders of magnitude, while simultaneously covering its full spectroscopic range, enabling the investigation of variety of nanoscale, mesoscale, and surface phenomena that were previously difficult to study.
Department of Energy

Contact: Kate Greene
kgreene@lbl.gov
510-486-4404
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 5-May-2014
Physical Review Letters
ORNL paper examines clues for superconductivity in an iron-based material
For the first time, scientists have a clearer understanding of how to control the appearance of a superconducting phase in a material, adding crucial fundamental knowledge and perhaps setting the stage for advances in the field of superconductivity.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 2-May-2014
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, May 2014
May 2014's story tips include reducing soot; hydropower; understanding driver behavior; and a performance record in high-temperature superconducting wires.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 2-May-2014
Journal of the American Chemical Society
Probing dopant distribution
Berkeley Lab researchers at the Molecular Foundry have shown that when doping a semiconductor to alter its electrical properties, equally important as the amount of dopant is how the dopant is distributed on the surface and throughout the material.
US Department of Energy's Office of Science

Contact: Rachel Berkowitz
rberkowitz@lbl.gov
510-486-7254
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 2-May-2014
Physical Review Letters
Element 117 discovered by Lawrence Livermore one step closer to being named
Element 117, first discovered by Lawrence Livermore scientists and international collaborators in 2002, is one step closer to being named.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 1-May-2014
Science
Study in Science finds missing piece of biogeochemical puzzle in aquifers
A study published today in Science by researchers from the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory may dramatically shift our understanding of the complex dance of microbes and minerals that takes place in aquifers deep underground. This dance affects groundwater quality, the fate of contaminants in the ground and the emerging science of carbon sequestration.
US Department of Energy's Office of Science

Contact: Brian Grabowski
bgrabowski@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 1-May-2014
PLOS ONE
Whales hear us more than we realize
Killer whales and other marine mammals likely hear sonar signals more than we've known. That's because commercially available sonar systems, which are designed to create signals beyond the range of hearing of such animals, also emit signals known to be within their hearing range, scientists have discovered.
US Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 1-May-2014
Science
Edgy look at 2-D molybdenum disulfide
Berkeley Lab researchers have recorded the first observations of a strong nonlinear optical resonance along the edges of single layers of molybdenum disulfide that could be key to the use of this and similar 2-D semiconductors in future nanoelectronic devices
US Department of Energy's Office of Science, US Air Force

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 30-Apr-2014
Widespread hydrogen fueling infrastructure goal of H2FIRST project
Established by the Energy Department's Fuel Cell Technologies Office in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, the Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Research and Station Technology (H2FIRST) project will draw on existing and emerging core capabilities at the national labs and aim to reduce the cost and time of new fueling station construction and improve the stations' availability and reliability.
DOE/Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

Contact: Mike Janes
mejanes@sandia.gov
925-294-2447
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 30-Apr-2014
Nature Communications
Harnessing magnetic vortices for making nanoscale antennas
Scientists seeking ways to synchronize the magnetic spins in nanoscale devices to build tiny yet more powerful signal-generating or receiving antennas and other electronics have published a study showing that stacked nanoscale magnetic vortices separated by an extremely thin layer of copper can be driven to operate in unison. These devices could potentially produce a powerful signal that could be put to work in a new generation of cell phones, computers, and other applications.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Apr-2014
NERSC, Cray, Intel to collaborate on next-generation supercomputer for science
The US Department of Energy's National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center and Cray Inc. announced today that they have signed a contract for a next generation of supercomputer to enable scientific discovery. This agreement is a significant step in advancing supercomputing design toward the kinds of computing systems we expect to see in the next decade as we advance to exascale.

Contact: Jon Bashor
bashor@lbl.gov
510-486-5849
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Apr-2014
Nature Scientific Reports
A glassy look for manganites
Researchers at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source discovered a glass-like re-ordering of electron-spin states as manganite crystals recovered from a photo-excited conductor state back to an insulator state. The discovery holds promise for future ultrafast electronic switching and memory devices.
US DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Apr-2014
Nature Communications
Ames Lab researchers see rare-earth-like magnetic properties in iron
Scientists at the Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory have observed magnetic properties typically associated with those observed in rare-earth elements in iron. These properties are observed in a new iron based compound that does not contain rare earth elements, when the iron atom is positioned between two nitrogen atoms. The discovery opens the possibility of using iron to provide both the magnetism and permanence in high-strength permanent magnets, like those used in direct-drive wind turbines or electric motors in hybrid cars.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Breehan Gerleman Lucchesi
breehan@ameslab.gov
515-294-9750
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
Journal of the American Chemical Society
'Double-duty' electrolyte enables new chemistry for longer-lived batteries
Researchers have developed a new and unconventional battery chemistry aimed at producing batteries that last longer than previously thought possible.

Contact: Morgan McCorkle
mccorkleml@ornl.gov
865-574-7308
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
How a plant beckons the bacteria that will do it harm
A common plant puts out a welcome mat to bacteria seeking to invade, and scientists have discovered the mat's molecular mix. The team showed that the humble and oft-studied plant Arabidopsis puts out a molecular signal that invites an attack from a pathogen. The study reveals new targets during the battle between microbe, which often infects tomatoes, and host that researchers can exploit to protect plants.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
Physical Review Letters
Atomic switcheroo explains origins of thin-film solar cell mystery
Treating cadmium-telluride solar cell materials with cadmium-chloride improves their efficiency, but researchers have not fully understood why.

Contact: Morgan McCorkle
mccorkleml@ornl.gov
865-574-7308
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
Angewandte Chemie International Edition
Halving hydrogen
Like a hungry diner ripping open a dinner roll, a fuel cell catalyst that converts hydrogen into electricity must tear open a hydrogen molecule. Now researchers have captured a view of such a catalyst holding onto the two halves of its hydrogen feast. The view confirms previous hypotheses and provides insight into how to make the catalyst work better for alternative energy uses, researchers reported in Angewandte Chemie International Edition.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Nano Letters
First size-based chromatography technique for the study of living cells
Using nanodot technology, Berkeley Lab researchers demonstrated the first size-based form of chromatography for studying the membranes of living cells. This unique physical approach to probing cellular membrane structures reveals critical information that can't be obtained through conventional microscopy.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters
NREL unlocking secrets of new solar material
A new solar material that has the same crystal structure as a mineral first found in the Ural Mountains in 1839 is shooting up the efficiency charts faster than almost anything researchers have seen before -- and it is generating optimism that a less expensive way of using sunlight to generate electricity may be in our planet's future.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Showing releases 126-150 out of 201.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 > >>

 

 

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