U.S.Department of Energy Research News
Text-Only | Privacy Policy | Site Map  
Search Releases and Features  
Biological SciencesComputational SciencesEnergy SciencesEnvironmental SciencesPhysical SciencesEngineering and TechnologyNational Security Science

Home
Labs
Multimedia Resources
News Releases
Feature Stories
Library
Contacts
RSS Feed



US Department of Energy National Science Bowl


Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 201-225 out of 401.

<< < 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 > >>

Public Release: 19-Jun-2014
Science
LLNL, MIT researchers develop new ultralight, ultrastiff 3D printed materials
Imagine a material with the same weight and density as aerogel -- a material so light it's called 'frozen smoke' -- but with 10,000 times more stiffness. This material could have a profound impact on the aerospace and automotive industries as well as other applications where lightweight, high-stiffness and high-strength materials are needed.

Contact: Ken Ma
ma28@llnl.gov
925-423-7602
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 19-Jun-2014
DOE awards $100 million for innovative energy research
U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz announced the awarding of $100 million for Energy Frontier Research Centers to accelerate the scientific breakthroughs needed to build the 21st-century energy economy.
DOE Office of Science

Contact: Dirk Fillpot
Dirk.Fillpot@science.doe.gov
202-287-6990
DOE/US Department of Energy

Public Release: 18-Jun-2014
Probing Fukushima with cosmic rays should speed cleanup
A Los Alamos technique called muon tomography can safely peer inside the cores of the Fukushima Daiichi reactors and create high-resolution images of the damaged nuclear material inside without ever breaching the cores themselves. The initiative could reduce the time required to clean up the disabled complex by at least a decade and greatly reduce radiation exposure to personnel working at the plant.

Contact: James E. Rickman
jamesr@lanl.gov
505-665-9203
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Jun-2014
Nature
Scientists take first dip into water's mysterious 'no-man's land'
Scientists at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have made the first structural observations of liquid water at temperatures down to minus 51 degrees Fahrenheit, within an elusive 'no-man's land' where water's strange properties are super-amplified.
US Department of Energy's Office of Science

Contact: Andy Freeberg
afreeberg@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-4359
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Dynamic spectroscopy duo
Berkeley Lab researchers have developed a new technique called two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy that can be used to study the interplay between electrons and atomic nuclei during a photochemical reaction. Photochemical reactions are critical to a wide range of natural and technological phenomena, including photosynthesis, vision, nanomaterials and solar energy.
US Department of Energy Office of Science, National Science Foundation

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Jun-2014
Genome Research
Study reveals livestock gut microbes contributing to greenhouse gas emissions
The EPA attributes one-fifth of methane emissions to livestock such as cattle, sheep and other ruminants, but the amount of methane produced varies substantially among animals in the same species. As published online June 6, 2014 in Genome Research, a team led by the U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute collaborated with NZ's AgResearch Limited to explore role the microbes living in the rumen play in this process.
U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
925-321-1107
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 16-Jun-2014
Moly 99 reactor using Sandia design could lead to US supply of isotope to track disease
An Albuquerque startup company has licensed a Sandia National Laboratories technology that offers a way to make molybdenum-99, a key radioactive isotope needed for diagnostic imaging in nuclear medicine, in the United States.

Contact: Nancy Salem
mnsalem@sandia.gov
505-844-2739
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 16-Jun-2014
International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology
LLNL researchers develop high-quality 3-D metal parts using additive manufacturing
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researchers have developed a new and more efficient approach to a challenging problem in additive manufacturing -- using selective laser melting, namely, the selection of appropriate process parameters that result in parts with desired properties.

Contact: Ken Ma
ma28@llnl.gov
925-423-7602
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Jun-2014
Nature Communications
Manipulating and detecting ultrahigh frequency sound waves
Berkeley Lab researchers have demonstrated a technique for detecting and controlling ultrahigh frequency sound waves at the nanometer scale. This represents an advance towards next generation ultrasonic imaging with potentially 1,000 times higher resolution than today's medical ultrasounds.
US Department of Energy's Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Jun-2014
Lawrence Livermore Lab awarded $5.6 million to develop next-generation neural devices
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory recently received $5.6 million from the Department of Defense's Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency to develop an implantable neural interface with the ability to record and stimulate neurons within the brain for treating neuropsychiatric disorders.
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

Contact: Ken Ma
ma28@llnl.gov
925-423-7602
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Jun-2014
Journal of American Chemical Society
DNA-linked nanoparticles form switchable 'thin films' on a liquid surface
Scientists have used DNA-linked nanoparticles to form a single-particle-thick layer on a liquid surface where the properties of the layer can be easily switched. Understanding the assembly of such nanostructured thin films provides a possible pathway to adjustable filters, surfaces with variable mechanical response, or even new ways to deliver genes for biomedical applications.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Jun-2014
Nano Letters
Improvements in MRIs, other image-detection applications on the horizon
Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories, along with collaborators from Rice University and the Tokyo Institute of Technology, are developing new terahertz detectors based on carbon nanotubes that could lead to significant improvements in medical imaging, airport passenger screening, food inspection and other applications.

Contact: Mike Janes
mejanes@sandia.gov
925-294-2447
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 11-Jun-2014
Nature
More than just food for koalas -- eucalyptus -- a global tree for fuel and fiber
Researchers seek to harness and improve upon Eucalyptus' potential for enhancing sustainable biofuels and biomaterials production. It can be harvested from tropical and temperate zones and has over 700 species that are rich in genetic variation. In the June 12, 2014, edition of the journal Nature, the international effort to sequence and analyze the genome of Eucalyptus grandis engaged more than 80 researchers from 30 institutions, representing 18 countries.
US Department of Energy's Office of Science

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
925-321-1107
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 10-Jun-2014
Report reviews estimates of costs and benefits of compliance with renewable portfolio standards
A new report, prepared by analysts from the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, reviews estimates of the costs and benefits of compliance with Renewable Portfolio Standards in the United States and explores how costs and benefits may evolve over time.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Jun-2014
NREL finds up to 6-cent per kilowatt-hour extra value with concentrated solar power
Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) projects would add additional value of 5 or 6 cents per kilowatt hour to utility-scale solar energy in California where 33 percent renewables will be mandated in six years, a new report by the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory has found.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Jun-2014
Princeton Plasma Lab funded to explore nanoparticles with plasma
The US Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has received some $4.3 million of DOE Office of Science funding, over three years, to develop an increased understanding of the role of plasma in the synthesis of nanoparticles. Such particles, which are measured in billionths of a meter, are prized for their use in everything from golf clubs and swimwear to microchips, paints and pharmaceutical products. They also have potentially wide-ranging applications in the development of new energy technologies.
US Department of Energy's Office of Science

Contact: Jeanne Jackson DeVoe
jjackson@pppl.gov
609-243-2757
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Jun-2014
Nature Communications
Berkeley Lab researchers create nanoparticle thin films that self-assemble in 1 minute
Berkeley Lab researchers have devised a technique whereby self-assembling nanoparticle arrays can form a highly ordered thin film over macroscopic distances in one minute.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Jun-2014
Nature Genetics
More than just a hill of beans: Phaseolus genome lends insights into nitrogen fixation
The US Department of Energy Office of Science has targeted research into the common bean because of its importance in enhancing nitrogen use efficiency for bioenergy crops sustainability, and for increasing plant resilience and productivity in the face of the changing climate and environment. To this end, a team of researchers sequenced and analyzed the genome of the common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris. The work was published online June 8, 2014, in the journal Nature Genetics.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
925-321-1107
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 8-Jun-2014
Nature Biotechnology
Retracing early cultivation steps: Lessons from comparing citrus genomes
Citrus is the world's most widely cultivated fruit crop but it is now under attack from citrus greening, an insidious emerging infectious disease destroying entire orchards. Researchers worldwide are mobilizing to apply genomic tools and approaches to understand how citrus varieties arose and how they respond to disease and other stresses. In the June 2014 issue of Nature Biotechnology, an international consortium of researchers analyzed and compared the genome sequences of ten diverse citrus varieties.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
925-321-1107
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 6-Jun-2014
Science
Scientists reveal details of calcium 'safety-valve' in cells
The New York Consortium on Membrane Protein Structure used X-rays at Brookhaven Lab's National Synchrotron Light Source to decipher the atomic level structure of a protein that regulates the level of calcium in cells, providing clues about a key signaling agent that can trigger programmed cell death and potentially leading to new anticancer drug targets.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Energy

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Jun-2014
Nano Letters
Evolution of a bimetallic nanocatalyst
Atomic-scale snapshots of a bimetallic nanoparticle catalyst in action have provided insights that could help improve the industrial process by which fuels and chemicals are synthesized from natural gas, coal or plant biomass.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 5-Jun-2014
Cell Reports
New clues to why older women are more vulnerable to breast cancer
Berkeley Lab scientists have gained more insights into why older women are more susceptible to breast cancer. They found that as women age, the cells responsible for maintaining healthy breast tissue stop responding to their immediate surroundings, including mechanical cues that should prompt them to suppress nearby tumors.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 5-Jun-2014
Licensing executive named distinguished fellow by international organization
Craig Smith, a licensing and business development specialist at Sandia National Laboratories, has been selected as a distinguished fellow by the Licensing Executives Society International and its Chemicals, Energy, Environment and Materials sector.

Contact: Mike Janes
mejanes@sandia.gov
925-294-2447
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 4-Jun-2014
Knoxville startup Fiveworx licenses ORNL energy analysis tool
Knoxville-based Fiveworx has licensed a technology that will help consumers reduce their utility bills by analyzing their home energy usage.

Contact: Morgan McCorkle
mccorkleml@ornl.gov
865-574-7308
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Jun-2014
Nature
Surprisingly strong magnetic fields challenge black holes' pull
A new study of supermassive black holes at the centers of galaxies has found magnetic fields play an impressive role in the systems' dynamics. In fact, in dozens of black holes surveyed, the magnetic field strength matched the force produced by the black holes' powerful gravitational pull.
NASA

Contact: Kate Greene
kgreene@lbl.gov
510-486-4404
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Showing releases 201-225 out of 401.

<< < 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 > >>

 

 

Text-Only | Privacy Policy | Site Map