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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 26-50 out of 408.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>

Public Release: 3-Oct-2014
Biogeochemistry
Argonne researchers create more accurate model for greenhouse gases from peatlands
Scientists at Argonne have created a new model to more accurately describe the greenhouse gases likely to be released from Arctic peatlands as they warm.
United States Department of Energy's Office of Science, National Science Foundation, United States Geological Survey Climate Research & Development Program, United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service

Contact: Brian Grabowski
media@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Oct-2014
Nature
RCas9: A programmable RNA editing tool
A powerful scientific tool for editing the DNA instructions in a genome can now also be applied to RNA as Berkeley Lab researchers have demonstrated a means by which the CRISPR/Cas9 protein complex can be programmed to recognize and cleave RNA at sequence-specific target sites.
National Institutes of Health, Center for RNA Systems Biology

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 2-Oct-2014
Physical Review C
A closer look at the perfect fluid
By combining data from two high-energy accelerators, nuclear scientists have refined the measurement of a remarkable property of exotic matter known as quark-gluon plasma. The findings reveal new aspects of the ultra-hot, 'perfect fluid' that give clues to the state of the young universe just microseconds after the big bang.
Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Kate Greene
kgreene@lbl.gov
510-486-4404
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 1-Oct-2014
Nature
Team advances understanding of the Greenland Ice Sheet's meltwater channels
A paper in Nature this week notes that observations of moulins (vertical conduits connecting water on top of the glacier down to the bed of the ice sheet) and boreholes in Greenland show that subglacial channels ameliorate the speedup caused by water delivery to the base of the ice sheet in the short term. By mid summer, however, the channels stabilize and are unable to grow any larger.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 1-Oct-2014
Physical Review Letters
Hide and seek: Sterile neutrinos remain elusive
The Daya Bay Collaboration, an international group of scientists studying the subtle transformations of subatomic particles called neutrinos, is publishing its first results on the search for a so-called sterile neutrino, a possible new type of neutrino beyond the three known neutrino 'flavors,' or types. The existence of this elusive particle, if proven, would have a profound impact on our understanding of the universe, and could impact the design of future neutrino experiments.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 1-Oct-2014
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, October 2014
The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's October 2014 story tips include stories on materials, cyber analytics, automobiles and energy.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
NIH taps lab to develop sophisticated electrode array system to monitor brain act
The National Institutes of Health awarded Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory a grant today to develop an electrode array system that will enable researchers to better understand how the brain works through unprecedented resolution and scale.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Ken Ma
ma28@llnl.gov
925-423-7602
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Microbiome
MaxBin: Automated sorting through metagenomes
MaxBin is an automated software program for binning the genomes of individual microbial species from metagenomic sequences developed at the Joint BioEnergy Institute.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Astrophysical Journal
Simulations reveal an unusual death for ancient stars
Certain primordial stars -- those 55,000 and 56,000 times the mass of our sun, or solar masses -- may have died unusually. In death, these objects -- among the universe's first generation of stars -- would have exploded as supernovae and burned completely, leaving no remnant black hole behind.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Linda Vu
lvu@lbl.gov
510-495-2402
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
2015 DOE JGI's science portfolio delves deeper into the Earth's data mine
In selecting 32 new projects with samples from diverse environments for the 2015 Community Science Program (CSP), the Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute shifts 'from solving an organism's genome sequence to enabling an understanding of what this information enables organisms to do.' The total allocation of the CSP 2015 portfolio is expected to exceed 60 trillion bases -- the equivalent of 20,000 human genomes of plant, fungal and microbial genome sequences.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
In-flight sensor tests a step toward Structural Health Monitoring for safer flights
Nine commercial aircraft flying regular routes are on the frontier of aviation safety, carrying sensors that monitor their structural health along with their routine maintenance. These flight tests are part of a Federal Aviation Administration certification process that will make the sensors widely available to US airlines.

Contact: Heather Clark
hclark@sandia.gov
505-844-3511
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 25-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
On the road to artificial photosynthesis
New experimental results from Berkeley Lab have revealed the critical influence of the electronic and geometric effects in the carbon dioxide reduction reaction.

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Sep-2014
Interactive map reveals rooftop reflectance for 5 California cities
Berkeley Lab scientists use aerial imagery to create an interactive map that displays the solar reflectance (also known as albedo) of individual roofs in Bakersfield, Long Beach, Los Angeles, San Francisco, and San Jose.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Sep-2014
NREL Industry Growth Forum attracts clean energy entrepreneurs and investors
Thirty clean energy companies will present their business cases to a panel of investors and industry experts Oct. 28-29 in Denver, as the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory hosts its annual Industry Growth Forum.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
Los Alamos researchers uncover properties in nanocomposite oxide ceramics for reactor fuel
The relationship between the termination chemistry and the dislocation structure of the interface offers potential avenues for tailoring transport properties and radiation damage resistance of oxide nanocomposites.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Sep-2014
New NIH/DOE grant for life science studies at NSLS-II
A new grant just awarded by the National Institutes of Health and the US Department of Energy will fund the operation of a suite of powerful experimental tools for Life Sciences research at DOE's Brookhaven National Laboratory.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, US Department of Energy

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Sep-2014
Physical Review Letters
Sandia magnetized fusion technique produces significant results
Working with two magnetic fields and a laser, all at low points of their power outputs, Sandia's Z machine has released neutrons in an amount surprisingly close to 'break-even' fusion.
DOE/National Nuclear Security Administration

Contact: neal singer
nsinger@sandia.gov
505-845-7078
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
American-made wind turbine blades
Sandia National Laboratories is helping makers of wind turbine blades improve the labor productivity associated with blade fabrication and finishing. This improved productivity makes domestic blades more cost competitive with blades from countries that pay workers lower wages.

Contact: Stephanie Holinka
slholin@sandia.gov
505-284-9227
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
Novel capability enables first test of real turbine engine conditions
Manufactures of turbine engines for airplanes, automobiles and electric generation plants could expedite the development of more durable, energy-efficient turbine blades thanks to a partnership between the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory, the German Aerospace Center and the universities of Central Florida and Cleveland State. The ability to operate turbine blades at higher temperatures improves efficiency and reduces energy costs.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, German Science Foundation

Contact: Tona Kunz
tkunz@anl.gov
630-252-5560
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Want to print your own cell phone microscope for pennies? Here's how
A 3-D printing process turns a cell phone into a high-powered microscope for pennies.
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Contact: Susan Bauer
susan.bauer@pnnl.gov
509-372-6083
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Science
Collaboration drives achievement in protein structure research
When this week's print issue of the journal Science comes out, a collective cheer will go up from New Mexico, Montana and even the Netherlands, thanks to the type of collaborative effort that is more and more the norm in these connected times.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Nature
X-rays unlock a protein's SWEET side
Understanding just how sugar makes its way into the cell could lead to the design of better drugs for diabetes patients and an increase in the amount of fruits and vegetables farmers are able to grow. Stanford University researchers have recently uncovered one of these 'pathways' into the cell by piecing together proteins slightly wider than the diameter of a strand of spider silk.
US Department of Energy, National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: Tona Kunz
tkunz@anl.gov
630-252-5560
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
eLife
Decoding virus-host interactions in the oxygen-starved ocean
In certain coastal areas, severe reductions in oxygen levels in the water destroy food web structure. Over the past 50 years, such oxygen minimum zones have expanded due to climate change and increased waste run-off. Reported in the journal eLife, a collaboration between researchers from the Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute, the University of British Columbia, and University of Arizona studied how viral infection influences a microbial community in one such OMZ.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Elusive quantum transformations found near absolute zero
Scientists mapped quantum phase transitions at temperatures colder than interstellar space. The ultra-cold conditions isolated the fluctuations that define the electronic, magnetic, and thermodynamic performance of metallic materials. The research provides new methods to identify and understand materials with powerful and unexpected properties, including superconductivity.
U.S. Department of Energy

Contact: Justin Eure
jeure@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Sep-2014
Nature Materials
Study sheds new light on why batteries go bad
A comprehensive look at how tiny particles in a lithium ion battery electrode behave shows that rapid-charging the battery and using it to do high-power, rapidly draining work may not be as damaging as researchers had thought -- and that the benefits of slow draining and charging may have been overestimated. The results challenge the prevailing view that 'supercharging' batteries is always harder on battery electrodes than charging at slower rates.
Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Stanford University, the Samsung-MIT Program for Materials Design in Energy Applications, U.S. Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Showing releases 26-50 out of 408.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>

 

 

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