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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 26-50 out of 202.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>

Public Release: 26-Mar-2014
Society of Toxicology Annual Meeting
ATHENA desktop human 'body' could reduce need for animal drug tests
Creating surrogate human organs, coupled with insights from highly sensitive mass spectrometry technologies, a new project is on the brink of revolutionizing the way we screen new drugs and toxic agents. ATHENA, the Advanced Tissue-engineered Human Ectypal Network Analyzer project team, is developing four human organ constructs -- liver, heart, lung and kidney -- that are based on a significantly miniaturized platform.
Defense Threat Reduction Agency

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Mar-2014
NREL driving research on hydrogen fuel cells
Hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles were the belles of the ball at recent auto shows in Los Angeles and Tokyo, and researchers at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory continue to play a key part in improving performance and durability while driving down costs.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Mar-2014
Entrepreneur teams with scientists to bring vaccines to far reaches of the world
With technical help from Sandia National Laboratories through the New Mexico Small Business Assistance Program, a Santa Fe entrepreneur has developed a solar thermal icemaker to cool high-performance shipping containers that safely transport and store temperature-sensitive vaccines and biopharmaceuticals. Thousands of the systems are now being used throughout the world.

Contact: Nancy Salem
505-844-2739
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 24-Mar-2014
Nature Methods
New technique for identifying gene-enhancers
Berkeley Lab researchers led the development of a new technique for identifying gene enhancers -- sequences of DNA that act to amplify the expression of a specific gene -- in the genomes of humans and other mammals. Called SIF-seq, this new technique complements existing genomic tools, such as ChIP-seq, and offers additional benefits.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Mar-2014
Nature Communications
New semiconductor holds promise for 2-D physics and electronics
Researchers at Berkeley Lab's Molecular Foundry have discovered a unique new semiconductor, rhenium disulfide, that behaves electronically as if it were a 2-D monolayer even as a 3-D bulk material. This not only opens the door to 2-D electronic applications with a 3D material, it also makes it possible to study 2-D physics with easy-to-make 3-D crystals.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Mar-2014
Nature Communications
Scientists discover potential way to make graphene superconducting
Scientists have discovered a potential way to make graphene -- a single layer of carbon atoms with great promise for future electronics -- superconducting, a state in which it would carry electricity with 100 percent efficiency.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Andy Freeberg
afreeberg@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-4359
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 19-Mar-2014
Recontres de Moriond 2014
International team of LHC and Tevatron scientists announces first joint result
Scientists on four major experiments on the Tevatron and Large Hadron Collider have pooled their data to arrive at the most precise measurement of the top quark.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Andre Salles
asalles@fnal.gov
630-840-6733
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Mar-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
Bright future for protein nanoprobes
Berkeley Lab researchers at the Molecular Foundry have discovered surprising new rules for creating ultra-bright light-emitting crystals that are less than 10 nanometers in diameter. These ultra-tiny but ultra-bright nanoprobes should be a big asset for biological imaging, especially deep-tissue optical imaging of neurons in the brain.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Mar-2014
Nature
Vast gene-expression map yields neurological and environmental stress insights
A consortium led by Berkeley Lab scientists has conducted the largest survey yet of how information encoded in an animal genome is processed in different organs, stages of development, and environmental conditions. Their findings, based on fruit fly research, paint a new picture of how genes function in the nervous system and in response to environmental stress.
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Mar-2014
Nature Geoscience
The rush to rain
A new analysis of satellite data reveals a link between dust in North Africa and West Asia and stronger Indian monsoons. The study in Nature Geoscience shows that dust in the air absorbs sunlight west of India, warming the air and strengthening the winds carrying moisture eastward, raining down in India about a week later. The results explain one way that dust can affect the climate, filling in previously unknown details about the Earth system.
Department of Energy

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Mar-2014
Emil Bozin awarded 2014 Science Prize from Neutron Scattering Society of America
The Neutron Scattering Society of America has named Emil Bozin, a condensed matter physicist at the US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory, the recipient of their 2014 Science Prize. The NSSA award specifically recognized Bozin's discovery of 'broken symmetry local structures in exotic electronic materials, his elaboration of their nature and their importance to the material properties, in particular in PbTe, iridates, manganites, and cuprates.'

Contact: Justin Eure
jeure@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Mar-2014
NREL aims to improve building energy performance with new web-based tool
The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory has developed a web-based tool to help consumers better understand the energy performance of building-related products. The Technology Performance Exchange is a portal that helps manufacturers and other organizations that measure and test products easily share performance data with product consumers.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Mar-2014
NREL examines solar policy pathways for states
The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has published a report that aligns solar policy and market success with state demographics. By organizing the 48 contiguous states into four peer groups based on shared non-policy characteristics, the NREL research team was able to contextualize the impact of various solar policies on photovoltaic installations.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Mar-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
A tale of 2 data sets: New DNA analysis strategy helps researchers cut through the dirt
Researchers from Michigan State University, the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, have published the largest soil DNA sequencing effort to date in PNAS. What has emerged in this first of the studies to come from this project is a simple, elegant solution to sifting through the deluge of information gleaned, as well as a sobering reality check on just how hard a challenge these environments will be.
Department of Energy Office of Science, US Department of Agriculture, National Science Foundation, Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
925-296-5643
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 7-Mar-2014
Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics
Promising news for solar fuels from Berkeley Lab researchers at JCAP
A JCAP study shows that nearly 90 percent of the electrons generated by a semiconductor/cobaloxime hybrid catalyst designed to store solar energy in hydrogen are being stored in their intended target molecules.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Mar-2014
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, March 2014
This release focuses on articles on lighter, stronger engines, safeguarding cyberspace, a Climate Change Science Institute annual report now available, collaborative innovation, and new superhydrophobic glass.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Mar-2014
Vertimass licenses ORNL biofuel-to-hydrocarbon conversion technology
Vertimass LLC has licensed an Oak Ridge National Laboratory technology that directly converts ethanol into a hydrocarbon blend-stock for use in transportation fuels.

Contact: Morgan McCorkle
mccorkleml@ornl.gov
865-574-7308
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Mar-2014
Biomaterials
First look at how Staphylococcus cells adhere to nanostructures could help fight infections
A team of researchers led by Berkeley Lab scientists have explored, for the first time, how individual Staphylococcus cells glom onto metallic nanostructures of various shapes and sizes that are not much bigger than the cells themselves. Their work could lead to a more nuanced understanding of what makes a surface less inviting to bacteria.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Mar-2014
Laminar-flow cleanroom inventor honored posthumously by National Inventors Hall of Fame
The inventor of the modern cleanroom, Willis Whitfield, will be honored posthumously by the National Inventors Hall of Fame for a technology that revolutionized manufacturing in electronics and pharmaceuticals, made hospital operating rooms safer and advanced space exploration.

Contact: Heather Clark
hclark@sandia.gov
505-844-3511
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 3-Mar-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
'Fore!' heads up, wide use of more flexible metallic glass coming your way
Tweaking the shearing characteristics of materials such as glass has important applications well beyond the sporting worldof glass-faced golf clubs, it's a matter of broader impact, aiding such fields as space science, electrical transformers, cell phone cases, and yes, golf clubs, because their mechanical and magnetic properties are highly adjustable.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Mar-2014
Nature Chemistry
Every step you take
The first direct, temporally resolved observations of intermediate steps in water oxidation using cobalt oxide, an Earth-abundant solid catalyst, revealed kinetic bottlenecks whose elimination would help boost the efficiency of artificial photosynthesis systems.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Mar-2014
Monthly Notices of Royal Astronomical Society
Standard-candle supernovae are still standard, but why?
Scientists believed that Type Ia supernovae, the best cosmological standard candles, are similar in brightness because they suffer thermonuclear explosions when the white dwarf stars that are their progenitors reach 1.4 solar masses, the Chandrasekhar mass. Now the Nearby Supernova Factory based at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has shown that white dwarfs exploding as Type Ia supernovae have a range of masses. Their light-curve widths are directly proportional to the mass involved in the explosion.
DOE/Office of Science, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Centre national de la recherche scientifique

Contact: Paul Preuss
paul_preuss@lbl.gov
415-272-3253
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Feb-2014
Nature Communications
Ultra-fast laser spectroscopy lights way to understanding new materials
Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory are revealing the mysteries of new materials using ultra-fast laser spectroscopy, similar to high-speed photography where many quick images reveal subtle movements and changes inside the materials. Seeing these dynamics is one emerging strategy to better understanding how new materials work, so that we can use them to enable new energy technologies.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Breehan Gerleman Lucchesi
breehan@ameslab.gov
515-294-9750
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Public Release: 27-Feb-2014
Science Academies explain global warming in 'plain English'
If emissions of greenhouse gases continue in a business-as-usual manner, future changes in climate will substantially exceed those that have occurred so far, with a warming of the Earth in the range of roughly five to nine degrees Fahrenheit by the end of the century.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 27-Feb-2014
Science
Big step for next-generation fuel cells and electrolyzers
Researchers at Berkeley and Argonne National Labs have discovered a highly promising new class of nanocatalysts for fuel cells and water-alkali electrolyzers that are an order of magnitude higher in activity than the target set by DOE for 2017.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Showing releases 26-50 out of 202.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>

 

 

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