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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 26-50 out of 400.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>

Public Release: 2-Dec-2014
ACS Nano
Lengthening the life of high capacity silicon electrodes in rechargeable lithium batteries
A new study will help researchers create longer-lasting, higher-capacity lithium rechargeable batteries, which are commonly used in consumer electronics. In a study published in the journal ACS Nano, researchers showed how a coating that makes high capacity silicon electrodes more durable could lead to a replacement for lower-capacity graphite electrodes.
Department of Energy

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 2-Dec-2014
Nature Communications
A better look at the chemistry of interfaces
SWAPPS -- Standing Wave Ambient Pressure Photoelectron Spectroscopy -- is a new X-ray technique developed at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source that provides sub-nanometer resolution of every chemical element to be found at heterogeneous interfaces, such as those in batteries, fuel cells and other devices.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 1-Dec-2014
Metabolic Engineering
Sweet smell of success
JBEI researchers have engineered E. coli bacteria to convert glucose into significant quantities of methyl ketones, a class of chemical compounds primarily used for fragrances and flavors, but highly promising as clean, green and renewable blending agents for diesel fuel.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Copper on the brain at rest
A new study by Berkeley Lab researchers has shown that proper copper levels are essential to the health of the brain at rest.
National Institutes of Health and Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Advanced Material Interfaces
Lawrence Livermore researchers develop efficient method to produce nanoporous metals
Nanoporous metals -- foam-like materials that have some degree of air vacuum in their structure -- have a wide range of applications because of their superior qualities.

Contact: Ken Ma
ma28@llnl.gov
925-423-7602
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
ORNL researchers Buchanan, Liang, Mayes named AAAS fellows
Three staff members from Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been named fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Contact: Chris Samoray
samoraycr@ornl.gov
865-241-0709
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
PLOS ONE
For important tumor-suppressing protein, context is key
Berkeley Lab scientists have learned new details about how an important tumor-suppressing protein, called p53, binds to the human genome. As with many things in life, they found that context makes a big difference.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Science
Discovery sheds light on nuclear reactor fuel behavior during a severe event
A new discovery about the atomic structure of uranium dioxide will help scientists select the best computational model to simulate severe nuclear reactor accidents.
DOE/Office of Science, DOE/Small Business Innovation Research Program

Contact: Tona Kunz
tkunz@anl.gov
630-252-5560
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Environmental Research Letters
Livermore scientists show salinity counts when it comes to sea level
Using ocean observations and a large suite of climate models, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory scientists have found that long-term salinity changes have a stronger influence on regional sea level changes than previously thought.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Industry Growth Forum
New initiatives debut at Industry Growth Forum
The clean energy revolution is now, and the Energy Department is stepping up its commitment to help innovators commercialize their best ideas. At the recent Industry Growth Forum in Denver, Colo., Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy David Danielson announced the new Lab-Corps program to accelerate the transfer of clean energy technologies from the national laboratories to the marketplace, so that game-changing innovations don't languish for lack of money and equipment.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Metallurgical and Materials Transactions
Lawrence Livermore develops method to measure residual stress in 3-D printed metal parts
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researchers have developed an efficient method to measure residual stress in metal parts produced by powder-bed fusion additive manufacturing.

Contact: Ken Ma
ma28@llnl.gov
925-423-7602
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Nature Climate Change
As temperatures rise, soil will relinquish less carbon to the atmosphere than predicted
Current climate models probably overestimate the amount of carbon that will be released from soil into the atmosphere as global temperatures rise, according to research from Berkeley Lab.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Nov-2014
Oak Ridge to acquire next generation supercomputer
The US Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility has signed a contract with IBM to bring a next-generation supercomputer to Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Contact: Morgan McCorkle
mccorkleml@ornl.gov
865-574-7308
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 12-Nov-2014
Journal of Advances in Modeling Earth Systems
Latest supercomputers enable high-resolution climate models, truer simulation of extreme weather
Not long ago, it would have taken several years to run a high-resolution simulation on a global climate model. But using some of the most powerful supercomputers now available, Berkeley Lab scientist Michael Wehner was able to complete a run in just three months. What he found was that not only were the simulations much closer to actual observations, but the high-resolution models were far better at reproducing intense storms, such as hurricanes and cyclones.
Department of Energy

Contact: Julie Chao
JHChao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 12-Nov-2014
Nature
Study at SLAC explains atomic action in high-temperature superconductors
A study at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory suggests for the first time how scientists might deliberately engineer superconductors that work at higher temperatures.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
ORNL materials researchers get first look at atom-thin boundaries
Scientists have made the first direct observations of a one-dimensional boundary separating two different, atom-thin materials, enabling studies of long-theorized phenomena at these interfaces.

Contact: Morgan McCorkle
mccorkleml@ornl.gov
865-574-7308
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
Nature
Good vibrations give electrons excitations that rock an insulator to go metallic
A team led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has made an important advancement in understanding a classic transition-metal oxide, vanadium dioxide, by quantifying the thermodynamic forces driving the transformation. The results are published in the Nov. 10 advance online issue of Nature.

Contact: Dawn Levy
levyd@ornl.gov
865-576-6448
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Termite of the sea's wood destruction strategy revealed
Shipworms, known as 'termites of the sea,' have vexed mariners and seagoing vessels for centuries. A recent study involving scientists from the Ocean Genome Legacy Center of New England Biolabs at Northeastern University, the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute, and other institutions has focused on the shipworm Bankia setacea to learn more about the enzymes it utilizes to break down wood for nutrition, information that may prove useful for the generation of biofuels.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
925-296-5643
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 6-Nov-2014
Cell Cycle
Scientists develop new way to study how human cells become immortal, a crucial precursor to cancer
Berkeley Lab scientists have developed a new method that can easily create immortal human mammary epithelial cells. The cells could greatly facilitate the examination of cell immortalization as it actually occurs during cancer progression.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Nov-2014
Applied Materials and Interfaces
ORNL thermomagnetic processing method provides path to new materials
For much the same reason LCD televisions offer eye-popping performance, a thermomagnetic processing method can advance the performance of polymers.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Nov-2014
Royal Society Interface
Synthetic biology for space exploration
Synthetic biology may hold the key to long-termed manned explorations of Mars and the Moon. Berkeley Lab researchers show that biomanufacturing based on microbes could to make travel to and settlement of extraterrestrial locations more practical and bearable.
NASA

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Nov-2014
Science
Discovering the undiscovered -- advancing new tools to fill in the microbial tree of life
In a perspective piece published Nov. 6 in the journal Science, Eddy Rubin, Director of the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute discusses why the time is right to apply genomic technologies to discover new life on Earth. 'Nature has been tinkering with life for at least three billion years and we now have a new set of ways to look for novel forms of life that have so far eluded discovery.'
US Department of Energy, DOE/Office of Science, DOE/Office of Biological and Environmental Research

Contact: David Gilbert
davidegilbert@gmail.com
925-296-5643
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 5-Nov-2014
Nano Letters
Golden approach to high-speed DNA reading
Berkeley researchers have created the world's first graphene nanopores that feature integrated optical antennas. The antennas open the door to high-speed optical nanopore sequencing of DNA.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 5-Nov-2014
Nature
Researchers hit milestone in accelerating particles with plasma
Scientists from the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and the University of California, Los Angeles have shown that a promising technique for accelerating electrons on waves of plasma is efficient enough to power a new generation of shorter, more economical accelerators. This could greatly expand their use in areas such as medicine, national security, industry and high-energy physics research.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Nov-2014
Review of Scientific Instruments
Synthetic fish measures wild ride through dams
A synthetic fish is helping existing hydroelectric dams and new, smaller hydro facilities become more fish-friendly. The latest version of the Sensor Fish -- a small tubular device filled with sensors that analyze the physical stresses fish experience -- measures more forces, costs about 80 percent less and can be used in more hydro structures than its predecessor, according to a paper published in the journal Review of Scientific Instruments.
US Department of Energy, Electric Power Research Institute

Contact: Franny White
franny.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Showing releases 26-50 out of 400.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>

 

 

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