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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 51-75 out of 408.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

Public Release: 12-Sep-2014
Ahoy, offshore wind: Research buoys bring vital data to untapped energy resource
Starting in November, two 20,000-pound buoys decked out with the latest in meteorological and oceanographic equipment will be deployed for a year at two offshore wind demonstration projects: one near Coos Bay, Ore., and another near Virginia Beach, Va. The bright yellow buoys -- each worth $1.3 million -- are being commissioned by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and will enable more accurate predictions of the power-producing potential of winds that blow off US shores.
Department of Energy

Contact: Franny White
franny.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Sep-2014
Nature
Excitonic dark states shed light on TMDC atomic layers
Berkeley Lab researchers believe they have uncovered the secret behind the unusual optoelectronic properties of single atomic layers of TMDC materials, the two-dimensional semiconductors that hold great promise for nanoelectronic and photonic applications.

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
Angling chromium to let oxygen through
Researchers have been trying to increase the efficiency of solid oxide fuel cells by lowering the temperatures at which they run. More efficient fuel cells might gain wider use in vehicles or as quiet, pollution-free, neighborhood electricity generating stations. A serendipitous finding has resulted in a semiconducting material that could enable fuel cells to operate at temperatures two-thirds lower than current technology, scientists reported Aug. 18 in Nature Communications.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Sep-2014
Nature Photonics
Advanced light source sets microscopy record
Working at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source, researchers used 'soft' X-rays to image structures only five nanometers in size. This resolution is the highest ever achieved with X-ray microscopy.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Sep-2014
Sandia cyber-testing contributes to DHS Transition to Practice
Through the Department of Homeland Security's Transition to Practice program, cybersecurity technologies developed at Sandia National Laboratories -- and at other federal labs -- now stand a better chance of finding their way into the real world.
Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate

Contact: Mike Janes
mejanes@sandia.gov
925-294-2447
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 10-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
PPPL scientists take key step toward solving a major astrophysical mystery
Magnetic reconnection can trigger geomagnetic storms that disrupt cell phone service, damage satellites and black out power grids. But how reconnection, in which the magnetic field lines in plasma snap apart and violently reconnect, transforms magnetic energy into explosive particle energy remains a major unsolved problem in plasma astrophysics.
US Department of Energy as well, Center for Magnetic Self-Organization

Contact: John Greenwald
jgreenwa@pppl.gov
609-243-2672
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
Crystal Solar and NREL team up to cut costs
A faster, cheaper way to manufacture silicon solar cells, partially funded by the Energy Department and fine-tuned at its National Renewable Energy Laboratory, has won a coveted R&D 100 award as one of the top technology innovations of 2013.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
National Renewable Energy Laboratory updates cetane data used for development of energy efficient fuels and engines
The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory has released a long-anticipated update to the source-of-record for cetane number data. This information is vital to the development of new, energy-efficient, low-carbon fuels and compatible engines. Researchers, as well as members of the engine, vehicle, and fuel industries, rely on these numbers to target compounds for development of new fuels capable of greater energy efficiency, cleaner emissions, and maximum performance in diesel engines.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
Buckyballs and diamondoids join forces in tiny electronic gadget
Scientists have married two unconventional forms of carbon -- one shaped like a soccer ball, the other a tiny diamond -- to make a molecule that conducts electricity in only one direction. This tiny electronic component, known as a rectifier, could play a key role in shrinking chip components down to the size of molecules to enable faster, more powerful devices.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Sep-2014
Science
A metallic alloy that is tough and ductile at cryogenic temperatures
A multi-element high‐entropy alloy not only tests out as one of the toughest materials on record, but, unlike most materials, the toughness as well as the strength and ductility of this alloy actually improves at cryogenic temperatures.
US Department of Energy's Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Sep-2014
Science
Birth of a mineral
One of the most important molecules on earth, calcium carbonate crystallizes into chalk, shells and minerals the world over. In a study led by the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, researchers used a powerful microscope that allows them to see the birth of crystals in real time, giving them a peek at how different calcium carbonate crystals form, they report in Sept. 5 issue of Science.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Sep-2014
Story from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Sept. 2014
1) Precision projectile tracker. 2) Microscopic needles to imprint the patient's corneal tissue. 3) Connecting vehicles could save nearly 3 billion gallons of fuel. 4) Tiny Titan can help middle and high school students explore the fundamental concepts of parallel computing.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Peptoid nanosheets at the oil-water interface
Researchers at Berkeley Lab's Molecular Foundry have developed peptoid nanosheets that form at the interface between oil and water, opening the door to increased structural complexity and chemical functionality for a broad range of applications.
DOE/Office of Science, Defense Threat Reduction Agency

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Nature Materials
Argonne scientists pioneer strategy for creating new materials
Making something new is never easy. Scientists constantly theorize about new materials, but when the material is manufactured it doesn't always work as expected. To create a new strategy for designing materials, scientists at the Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory combined two different approaches at two different facilities to synthesize new materials. This new strategy gives faster feedback on what growth schemes are best, thus shortening the timeframe to manufacture a new, stable material for energy transport and conversion applications.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Tona Kunz
tkunz@anl.gov
630-252-5560
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Cell Host & Microbe
Study reveals how Ebola blocks immune system
Researchers have identified one way the Ebola virus dodges the body's antiviral defenses, providing important insight that could lead to new therapies.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Brian Grabowski
media@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Bone
Revealing a novel mode of action for an osteoporosis drug
Raloxifene is a US Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment for decreasing fracture risk in osteoporosis. While raloxifene is as effective at reducing fracture risk as other current treatments, this works only partially by suppressing bone loss. X-ray studies revealed an additional mechanism underlying raloxifene action, providing an explanation for how this drug can achieve equivalent clinical benefit.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Energy

Contact: Tona Kunz
tkunz@anl.gov
630-252-5560
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Science
Mysteries of space dust revealed
The first analysis of space dust collected by a special collector onboard NASA's Stardust mission and sent back to Earth for study in 2006 suggests the tiny specks open a door to studying the origins of the solar system and possibly the origin of life itself.
NASA, US Department of Energy, Klaus Tschira Foundation, Tawani Foundation, German Science Foundation, Funds for Scientific Research -- Flanders, Belgium

Contact: Tona Kunz
tkunz@anl.gov
630-252-5560
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Ames Laboratory scientists named 'Most Influential Scientific Minds'
Three Ames Laboratory physicists, Paul Canfield, Sergey Bud'ko, and Costas Soukoulis, were recently named to Thomson Reuters' World's Most Influential Scientific Minds 2014.

Contact: Laura Millsaps
millsaps@ameslab.gov
515-294-3474
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Science
Home is where the microbes are
A study published today in Science reports provides a detailed analysis of the microbes that live in houses and apartments. The study was conducted by researchers from the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Chicago.
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, National Institutes of Health, US Environmental Protection Agency, National Science Foundation

Contact: Brian Grabowski
bgrabowski@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
RSC Advances
Rubber meets the road with new ORNL carbon, battery technologies
Recycled tires could see new life in lithium-ion batteries.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Nature
Encyclopedia of how genomes function gets much bigger
A big step in understanding the mysteries of the human genome was unveiled today in the form of three analyses that provide the most detailed comparison yet of how the genomes of the fruit fly, roundworm, and human function. The analyses will likely offer insights into how the information in the human genome regulates development, and how it is responsible for diseases.
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Breakthrough antibacterial approach could resolve serious skin infections
In several cases, scientists found an ionic liquid was more efficacious on a pathogenic biofilm than a standard bleach treatment and exhibited minimal cytotoxicity effects on human cell lines (unlike bleach). This has excellent prospects for aiding antibiotic delivery to the pathogen through biofilm disruption.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Science
Composition of Earth's mantle revisited
Research published recently in Science suggested that the makeup of the Earth's lower mantle, which makes up the largest part of the Earth by volume, is significantly different than previously thought. This should shed light on unexplained seismic phenomena.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, NNSA

Contact: Tona Kunz
630-252-5560
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Science
Unprecedented detail of intact neuronal receptor offers blueprint for drug developers
Scientists succeeded in obtaining an unprecedented view of a type of brain-cell receptor that is implicated in a range of neurological illnesses, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, depression, schizophrenia, autism, and ischemic injuries associated with stroke.
US Department of Energy, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Tona Kunz
tkunz@anl.gov
630-252-5560
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
Competition for graphene
Berkeley Lab reports the first experimental observation of ultrafast charge transfer in photo-excited MX2 materials, the graphene-like two-dimensional semiconductors. Charge transfer time clocked in at under 50 femtoseconds, comparable to the fastest times recorded for organic photovoltaics.

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Showing releases 51-75 out of 408.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

 

 

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