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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 51-75 out of 506.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

Public Release: 29-Mar-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Holistic data analysis and modeling poised to transform protein X-ray crystallography
A new 3-D modeling and data-extraction technique is about to transform the field of X-ray crystallography, with potential benefits for both the pharmaceutical industry and structural biology. A paper this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences describes the improved blending of experimentation and computer modeling, extracting valuable information from diffuse, previously discarded data.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Mar-2016
City resilience: Sandia analyzes effects of rising sea levels in Norfolk
Sandia National Laboratories created an Urban Resilience Analysis Process to help cities become more resilient. The process is a holistic framework that includes Sandia's critical infrastructure modeling and simulation tools, risk consequence assessment and systems analysis expertise to show cities the most effective investments they can make to become more resilient.

Contact: Heather Clark
hclark@sandia.gov
505-844-3511
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 28-Mar-2016
Physical Review Letters
A view of the colorful microcosm within a proton
By analyzing the particle debris emitted from collisions of polarized protons at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, scientists say they've found a new way to glimpse the microcosm within these building blocks of matter. They've measured a key effect of the so-called color interaction -- the basis for the strong nuclear force that binds quarks within the proton.
DOE Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Mar-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Nature-inspired nanotubes that assemble themselves, with precision
Berkeley Lab scientists have discovered a family of nature-inspired polymers that, when placed in water, spontaneously assemble into hollow crystalline nanotubes. The nanotubes can be tuned to all have the same diameter of between five and ten nanometers, depending on the length of the polymer chain.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Mar-2016
Smaller. Cheaper. Better.
A Sandia-led team has developed a way to make a magnetic material that could lead to lighter and smaller, cheaper and better-performing high-frequency transformers, needed for more flexible energy storage systems and widespread adoption of renewable energy.
DOE/Energy Storage Program, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability

Contact: Stephanie Holinka
slholin@sandia.gov
505-284-9227
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 24-Mar-2016
Nature Communications
Moving microswimmers with tiny swirling flows
Scientists at Argonne National Laboratory have discovered a way to use a microscopic, swirling flow to rapidly clear a circle of tiny bacteria or swimming robots.
DOE/Office of Science, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Mar-2016
Science
Scientists part the clouds on how droplets form
A new Berkeley Lab study reveals that much more is happening at the microscopic level of cloud formation than previously thought. The findings could help improve the accuracy of climate change models.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Sarah Yang
scyang@lbl.gov
510-486-4575
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Mar-2016
Nature
Unlocking the secrets of gene expression
Using cryo-electron microscopy, Berkeley Lab scientist Eva Nogales and her team have made a breakthrough in our understanding of how our molecular machinery finds the right DNA to copy for making proteins, showing with unprecedented detail the role of a powerhouse transcription factor known as TFIID. The study was published this week in Nature.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness

Contact: Julie Chao
jhchao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Mar-2016
Advanced Functional Materials
ORNL researchers invent tougher plastic with 50 percent renewable content
Researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have made a better thermoplastic by replacing styrene with lignin, a brittle, rigid polymer that, with cellulose, forms the woody cell walls of plants. In doing so, they have invented a solvent-free production process that interconnects equal parts of nanoscale lignin dispersed in a synthetic rubber matrix to produce a meltable, moldable, ductile material that's at least ten times tougher than ABS, a common thermoplastic.
ORNL's Technology Innovation Program

Contact: Dawn Levy
levyd@ornl.gov
865-576-6448
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Mar-2016
ORNL seeking US manufacturers to license low-cost carbon fiber process
Researchers have demonstrated a production method they estimate will reduce the cost of carbon fiber as much as 50 percent and the energy used in its production by more than 60 percent.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Mar-2016
NREL's capabilities boost a wide range of innovative ARPA-E research
The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) will play key roles in a variety of projects recently funded by the Department's Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E). NREL's innovative approaches have received five awards across three different ARPA-E programs for advancing transformational technologies to generate, store, and use energy more efficiently, at lower costs and with reduced emissions.
DOE/ARPA-E

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Mar-2016
ACS Nano
ORNL-NIST team explores nanoscale objects and processes with microwave microscopy
Researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the National Institute of Standards and Technology have demonstrated a nondestructive way to observe nanoscale objects and processes in conditions simulating their normal operating environments. Their novel approach combines ultrathin membranes with microwaves and a scanning probe.
Department of Energy Office of Science, National Institute of Standards and Technology

Contact: Dawn Levy
levyd@ornl.gov
865-576-6448
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Mar-2016
Journal of Materials Chemistry A
Pumping up energy storage with metal oxides
Material scientists at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have found certain metal oxides increase capacity and improve cycling performance in lithium-ion batteries.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Mar-2016
Analytical Chemistry
Lighting up disease-carrying mosquitoes
Robert Meagher, a chemical engineer at Sandia National Laboratories, has developed a simple technique for simultaneously detecting RNA from West Nile and chikungunya virus in samples from mosquitoes. He is now working to add the ability to screen for Zika virus.

Contact: Patti Koning
pkoning@sandia.gov
925-294-4911
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 17-Mar-2016
Small businesses win technical support to develop clean energy technologies
Four small businesses will be working with Los Alamos National Laboratory to accelerate the nation's transformation toward a clean energy economy as part of the Department of Energy's Small Business Vouchers (SBV) pilot project. These businesses will gain access to world-class laboratory resources to help move innovative ideas and technologies closer to the marketplace.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Laura Mullane
mullane@lanl.gov
505-667-6012
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Mar-2016
ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces
Replacement for silicon devices looms big with ORNL discovery
Two-dimensional electronic devices could inch closer to their ultimate promise of low power, high efficiency and mechanical flexibility with a processing technique developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Mar-2016
Angewandte Chemie
'Disruptive device' brings xenon-NMR to fragile materials
Scientists have developed a device that enables NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy, coupled with a powerful molecular sensor, to analyze molecular interactions in viscous solutions and fragile materials such as liquid crystals. In a first, their method allows the sensor, hyperpolarized xenon gas, to be dissolved into minute samples of substances without disrupting their molecular order.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Mar-2016
Scientific Reports
New explosion gas-signature models can help inspectors locate and identify underground nuclear tests
Through experiments and computer models of gas releases, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory scientists have simulated signatures of gases from underground nuclear explosions (UNEs) that may be carried by winds far from the detonation.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Mar-2016
Advanced Energy Materials
Advanced energy storage material gets unprecedented nanoscale analysis
Researchers have combined advanced in-situ microscopy and theoretical calculations to uncover important clues to the properties of a promising next-generation energy storage material for supercapacitors and batteries.

Contact: Bill Cabage
cabagewh@ornl.gov
865-574-4399
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Mar-2016
ACS Photonics
New ORNL method could unleash solar power potential
New ORNL measurement and data analysis techniques could provide insight into performance-robbing flaws in crystalline structures, ultimately improving the performance of solar cells.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Mar-2016
Physical Review Letters
Compressing turbulence to improve inertial confinement fusion experiments
Article describes possible new paradigm for inertial confinement fusion experiments.
DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration, Defense Threat Reducation Agency, National Science Foundation

Contact: John Greenwald
jgreenwa@pppl.gov
609-243-2672
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Mar-2016
Nature Geoscience
Nature study reveals rapid ice-wedge loss across Arctic
Permafrost covers a considerable part of the Arctic; it's been thawing in recent decades, releasing greenhouse gases. New research reveals that similarly ancient ice wedges that form the prevalent honeycomb pattern across the tundra appear to be melting rapidly across the Arctic.
DOE Office of Science

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Mar-2016
PLOS ONE
Microbes may not be so adaptable to climate change
Microbes in soil -- organisms that exert enormous influence over our planet's carbon cycle -- may not be as adaptable to climate change as most scientists have presumed.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Mar-2016
Hunting for Big Bang neutrinos that could shed new light on the origin of the universe
Article describes a Princeton University physicists laboratory at PPPL to hunt for Big Bang neutrinos.
Simons Foundation, John Templeton Foundation

Contact: John Greenwald
jgreenwa@pppl.gov
609-243-2672
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Mar-2016
Nature Communications
Shock compression research shows hexagonal diamond could serve as meteor impact marker
In 1967, a hexagonal form of diamond, later named lonsdaleite, was identified for the first time inside fragments of the Canyon Diablo meteorite, the asteroid that created the Barringer Crater in Arizona.

Contact: Breanna Bishop
bishop33@llnl.gov
925-423-9802
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Showing releases 51-75 out of 506.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

 

 

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