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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 76-100 out of 202.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 > >>

Public Release: 12-Feb-2014
Nature
NIF experiments show initial gain in fusion fuel
Ignition the process of releasing fusion energy equal to or greater than the amount of energy used to confine the fuel has long been considered the "holy grail" of inertial confinement fusion science. A key step along the path to ignition is to have "fuel gains" greater than unity, where the energy generated through fusion reactions exceeds the amount of energy deposited into the fusion fuel.

Contact: Breanna Bishop
bishop33@llnl.gov
925-423-9802
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Feb-2014
NREL report finds similar value in 2 CSP technologies
Parabolic troughs and dry-cooled towers deliver similar value for concentrating solar power plants, despite different solar profiles, a new report by the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory has found.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Feb-2014
NREL director Arvizu elected to National Academy of Engineering
Dan Arvizu, director of the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory, has been elected to membership in the National Academy of Engineering.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
Targeting tumors: Ion beam accelerators take aim at cancer
Hear the latest in the development of particle accelerators for delivering cancer-killing beams from a physicist, a radiobiologist, and a clinical oncologist, and participate in a discussion about cost, access, and ethics.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 7-Feb-2014
Physics Review Letters
New application of physics tools used in biology
A Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory physicist and his colleagues have found a new application for the tools and mathematics typically used in physics to help solve problems in biology.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 7-Feb-2014
Anderson recognized with TMS Application to Practice Award
Iver Anderson, senior metallurgist at the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory, has been chosen as a recipient of the 2014 Application to Practice Award by the Minerals, Metals and Materials Society.
Minerals, Metals and Materials Society

Contact: Laura Millsaps
millsaps@ameslab.gov
515-294-3474
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Feb-2014
Science
New insight into an emerging genome-editing tool
A collaboration led by Berkeley Lab's Jennifer Doudna and Eva Nogales has produced the first detailed look at the 3D structure of the Cas9 enzyme and how it partners with guide RNA to interact with target DNA. The results should enhance Cas9's value and versatility as a genome-editing tool.
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, National Science Foundation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 5-Feb-2014
Nature Materials
Crossover sound
The first "unambiguous demonstration" of the atomic-scale sound waves known as phonons crossing over from particle-like to wave-like behavior in superlattices opens the door to improved thermoelectrics and possibly even phonon lasers.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 5-Feb-2014
Nature
Quarks in the looking glass
A recent experiment carried out at DOE's Jefferson Lab has determined how much of the mirror-symmetry breaking in the electron-quark interaction originates from quarks' spin preference in the weak interaction five times more precisely than a previous measurement. The result has also set new limits, in a way complementary to high-energy colliders such as the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, for the energies that researchers would need to access physics beyond the Standard Model.
Department of Energy Office of Science, National Science Foundation Division of Physics, Jeffress Memorial Trust

Contact: Kandice Carter
kcarter@jlab.org
757-269-7263
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

Public Release: 4-Feb-2014
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, February 2014
This release focuses on 1) LEDs to light UT arena. 2) Self-cleaning solar panel. 3) Bioenergy researchers defeating lignin. 4) Protection for utilities. 5) New tool for first responders.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Feb-2014
Nature Communications
Good hair day: New technique grows tiny 'hairy' materials at the microscale
Scientists at Argonne National Laboratory attacked a tangled problem by developing a new technique to grow tiny "hairy" materials that assemble themselves at the microscale.
US Department of Energy's Office of Science, Russian Russian Foundation for Basic Research

Contact: Louise Lerner
Louise@anl.gov
630-252-5526
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Feb-2014
NERSC Users Group Meeting 2014
NERSC announces second annual HPC Achievement Awards
The US Department of Energy's National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) announced the recipients of its second annual High Performance Computing (HPC) Achievement Awards on Feb. 4, 2014, during the annual NERSC User Group meeting at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab). The awards recognize innovative uses of HPC to solve scientific problems or exceptional impact on scientific understanding or society. To encourage younger scientists, NERSC also presented two early career awards.
US Deptartment of Energy's Office of Science

Contact: Jon Bashor
jbashor@lbl.gov
510-486-5849
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Feb-2014
Molecular Cell
How a shape-shifting DNA-repair machine fights cancer
Maybe you've seen the movies or played with toy Transformers, those shape-shifting machines that morph in response to whatever challenge they face. It turns out that DNA-repair machines in your cells use a similar approach to fight cancer and other diseases, according to new research led by Berkeley Lab scientists.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-484-5956
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 30-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Tracking Asian air pollution aids policymakers
New research from a team of scientists, that included Argonne's David Streets, a senior energy and environmental policy scientist, showed that several different air pollutants from China reach the shores of the western United States. The Chinese-led international research team found that the export of air pollution is tied directly to China's production of consumer goods for export to the United States.
Department of Energy Office of Science, NASA

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 30-Jan-2014
PNNL recognized for transferring innovation to the marketplace
The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been recognized for creating 3-D headset display technology that could improve the sight of soldiers in dark battlefields and gamers immersed in virtual reality.

Contact: Eric Francavilla
eric.francavilla@pnnl.gov
509-372-4066
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 30-Jan-2014
Edison electrifies scientific computing
The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center recently accepted "Edison," a new flagship supercomputer designed for scientific productivity. Named in honor of American inventor Thomas Alva Edison, the Cray XC30 will be dedicated in a ceremony held at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) on Feb. 5. Scientists are already reporting results using the new system.
US Deptartment of Energy's Office of Science, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency High Productivity Computing Systems

Contact: Margie Wylie
mwylie@lbl.gov
510-486-7421
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Jan-2014
Nature
Puzzling question in bacterial immune system answered
Berkeley researchers have answered a central question about Cas9, an enzyme that plays an essential role in the bacterial immune system and is fast becoming a valuable tool for genetic engineering: How is Cas9 able to precisely discriminate between non-self DNA that must be degraded and self DNA that may be almost identical within genomes that are millions to billions of base pairs long.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Jan-2014
Energy Policy
Modeling buildings by the millions: Building codes in China tested for energy savings
PNNL scientists at the Joint Global Change Research Institute, a partnership with the University of Maryland in College Park, Md., have created a unique model that projects how much energy can be saved with changes to China's building energy codes.
Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Global Technology Strategy Program

Contact: Eric Francavilla
eric.francavilla@pnnl.gov
509-372-4066
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Jan-2014
International Journal of Cancer
Berkeley Lab research finds running may be better than walking for breast cancer survival
Previous studies have shown that breast cancer survivors who meet the current exercise recommendations (2.5 hours of moderate intensity physical activity per week) are at 25 percent lower risk for dying from breast cancer. New research from Berkeley Lab, and reported in the International Journal of Cancer, suggests that exceeding the recommendations may provide greater protection, and that running may be better than walking.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jon Weiner
jrweiner@lbl.gov
510-486-4014
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Jan-2014
NREL study: Active power control of wind turbines can improve power grid reliability
The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory, along with partners from the Electric Power Research Institute and the University of Colorado have completed a comprehensive study to understand how wind power technology can assist the power grid by controlling the active power output being placed onto the system. The rest of the power system's resources have traditionally been adjusted around wind to support a reliable and efficient system. The research that led to this report challenges that concept.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 27-Jan-2014
Physical Review Letters
ORNL study advances quest for better superconducting materials
Nearly 30 years after the discovery of high-temperature superconductivity, many questions remain, but an Oak Ridge National Laboratory team is providing insight that could lead to better superconductors.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Jan-2014
Nature Communications
Cooling microprocessors with carbon nanotubes
Berkeley Lab researchers at the Molecular Foundry have developed a "process friendly" technique to enable the cooling of microprocessor chips through the use of carbon nanotubes.
US Department of Energy Office of Science, Intel Corporation

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Jan-2014
Small Satellites
Lawrence Livermore 'space cops' to help control traffic in space
A team of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory scientists are using mini-satellites that work as "space cops" to help control traffic in space.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Jan-2014
Energy and Building
White, green or black roofs? Berkeley Lab report compares economic payoffs
Looking strictly at the economic costs and benefits of three different roof types -- black, white and "green" (or vegetated) -- Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory researchers have found in a new study that white roofs are the most cost-effective over a 50-year time span. While the high installation cost of green roofs sets them back in economic terms, their environmental and amenity benefits may at least partially mitigate their financial burden.

Contact: Julie Chao
jhchao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
E-whiskers
Researchers with Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley have created e-whiskers -- highly sensitive tactile sensors made from carbon nanotubes and silver nanoparticles that should have a wide range of applications including advanced robotics, human-machine interfaces, and biological and environmental sensors.
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Showing releases 76-100 out of 202.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 > >>

 

 

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