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DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 164.

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Public Release: 30-Jul-2015
Argonne National Lab finds butanol is good for boats
Argonne has collaborated with Bombardier Recreational Products and the National Marine Manufacturers Association to demonstrate the effectiveness of a fuel blend with 16 percent butane. This blend would incorporate more biofuels into marine fuel without the issues caused by increasing levels of ethanol, which can cause difficulties in marine engines at high concentrations.
Vehicle Technologies Office within DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

Contact: Greg Cunningham
gcunningham@anl.gov
630-252-8232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Jul-2015
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics
Playing 'tag' with pollution lets scientists see who's 'it'
Using a climate model that can tag sources of soot and track where it lands, researchers have determined which areas around the Tibetan Plateau contribute the most soot -- and where. The model can also suggest the most effective way to reduce soot on the plateau, easing the amount of warming the region undergoes. The study, which appeared in Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics in June, might help policy makers target pollution reduction efforts.
US Department of Energy, National Basic Research Program of China

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Jul-2015
Nature
Tiny grains of rice hold big promise for greenhouse gas reductions, bioenergy
Rice is the staple food for more than half of the world's population, but the paddies it's grown in contributes up to 17 percent of global methane emissions -- about 100 million tons a year. Now, with the addition of a single gene, rice can be cultivated to emit virtually no methane, more starch for a richer food source and biomass for energy production, as announced in the July 30 edition of Nature and online.
The Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning, National Natural Science Foundation of China

Contact: Dawn Zimmerman
dawn.zimmerman@pnnl.gov
509-372-6618
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Jul-2015
Journal of Chemical Physics
New computer model could explain how simple molecules took first step toward life
Sergei Maslov, a computational biologist at the US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory and adjunct professor at Stony Brook University, and Alexei Tkachenko, a scientist at Brookhaven's Center for Functional Nanomaterials, have developed a model that explains how simple monomers could rapidly make the jump to more complex self-replicating polymers. What their model points to could have intriguing implications for the origins of life on Earth and CFN's work in engineering artificial self-assembly at the nanoscale.
DOE Office of Science

Contact: Peter Genzer
genzer@bnl.gov
631-344-3174
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Jul-2015
Science Advances
Unlocking the rice immune system
JBEI and UC Davis researchers have identified a bacterial signaling molecule that triggers an immunity response in rice plants, enabling the plants to resist a devastating blight disease.

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Jul-2015
Nature
Long-sought discovery fills in missing details of cell 'switchboard'
A biomedical breakthrough in the journal Nature reveals never-before-seen details of the human body's cellular switchboard that regulates sensory and hormonal responses. The work is based on an X-ray laser experiment at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
glennr@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-4496
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Jul-2015
Science
Unearthing cornerstones in root microbiomes
A plant's immune system can distinguish between friends and foes among these microbes, and upon detecting pathogens, can produce regulatory chemicals called phytohormones to activate a defensive response. In a study published online July 16, 2015, in Science Express, a team including scientists from the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute looked at roles of three phytohormones in controlling the composition of the root microbiome in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 15-Jul-2015
FASEB Journal
Closer look at microorganism provides insight on carbon cycling
An Argonne/University of Tennessee research team reconstructed the crystal structure of BAP, a protein involved in the process by which marine archaea release carbon, to determine how it functioned, as well as its larger role in carbon cycling in marine sediments.

Contact: Brian Grabowski
bgrabowski@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Jul-2015
Battery second use offsets electric vehicle expenses, improves grid stability
Plug-in electric vehicles have the potential to dramatically drive down consumption of carbon-based fuels and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, but the relatively high price of these vehicles -- due in large part to the cost of batteries -- has presented a major impediment to widespread market penetration. Researchers at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory are playing a crucial role in identifying battery second use strategies capable of offsetting vehicle expenses while improving utility grid stability.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Jul-2015
Nature Communications
Gut microbes enable coffee pest to withstand extremely toxic concentrations of caffeine
Berkeley Lab scientists discovered that coffee berry borers worldwide share 14 bacterial species in their digestive tracts that degrade and detoxify caffeine. They also found the most prevalent of these bacteria has a gene that helps break down caffeine. Their research sheds light on the ecology of the destructive bug and could lead to new ways to fight it.
US Department of Agriculture, Laboratory Directed Research and Development program at Berkeley Lab, Mexico's National Council for Science and Technology

Contact: Jon Weiner
jrweiner@lbl.gov
510-486-4014
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 12-Jul-2015
Science Advances
How clouds get their brightness
How clouds form and how they help set the temperature of the earth are two of the big remaining questions in climate research. Now, a study of clouds over the world's remotest ocean shows that ocean life is responsible for up to half the cloud droplets that pop in and out of existence during summer.
US Department of Energy, NASA, US Department of Defense, National Science Foundation

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Jul-2015
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to help small 'green' businesses
PNNL named a lead laboratory for new DOE Pilot designed to give small clean energy firms more technology assistance from DOE labs.
Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

Contact: Susan Bauer
susan.bauer@pnnl.gov
509-372-6083
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 7-Jul-2015
Biomass & Bioenergy
Scientists study ways to integrate biofuels and food crops on farms
Planting bioenergy crops like willows or switchgrass in rows where commodity crops are having difficulty growing could both provide biomass feedstock and also limit the runoff of nitrogen fertilizer into waterways -- all without hurting a farmer's profits.
DOE/Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

Contact: Greg Cunningham
media@anl.gov
630-252-5593
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Jun-2015
Science
Orange is the new red
Berkeley Lab researchers discovered that a photoprotective mechanism in cyanobacteria is triggered by an unprecedented, large-scale movement from one location to another of the carotenoid pigment within the Orange Carotenoid Protein.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Jun-2015
ACS Environmental Science and Technology
Argonne analysis shows increased carbon intensity from Canadian oil sands
The US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory this week released a study that shows gasoline and diesel refined from Canadian oil sands has a higher carbon impact than fuels derived from conventional domestic crude sources.
Bioenergy Technologies Office and Vehicle Technologies Office within US Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

Contact: Gregory Cunningham
gcunningham@anl.gov
630-252-8232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Jun-2015
Journal of Physical Oceanography
Analyzing ocean mixing reveals insight on climate
Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed a computer model that clarifies the complex processes driving ocean mixing in the vast eddies that swirl across hundreds of miles of open ocean.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 19-Jun-2015
Physics Review Letters
New 'molecular movie' reveals ultrafast chemistry in motion
Scientists for the first time tracked ultrafast structural changes, captured in quadrillionths-of-a-second steps, as ring-shaped gas molecules burst open and unraveled. Ring-shaped molecules are abundant in biochemistry and also form the basis for many drug compounds. The study points the way to a wide range of real-time X-ray studies of gas-based chemical reactions that are vital to biological processes.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Jun-2015
Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry
New tool on horizon for surgeons treating cancer patients
Surgeons could know while their patients are still on the operating table if a tissue is cancerous, according to researchers from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Brigham and Women's Hospital/Harvard Medical School.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Jun-2015
New fog chamber provides testing options that could improve security cameras
Sandia National Laboratories has developed a fog chamber -- one of the world's largest -- that creates a controlled environment to more easily test security cameras, sensors or other equipment.

Contact: Heather Clark
hclark@sandia.gov
505-844-3511
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 16-Jun-2015
ISME Journal
Automating microbial genome sequence decontamination
Single cell genomics and metagenomics have helped researchers assess environmental microbial community structure and function. To help speed up the time-consuming sequence decontamination process of microbial genomes in public databases, a US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute team has developed the first computational protocol for quick and automated removal of contaminant sequences from draft genomes and describe it in a study published online June 9, 2015, in The ISME Journal.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 16-Jun-2015
NREL partnerships to help the grid accommodate more renewable energy
The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory announces five new partnerships that will award up to $6.5 million in federal funds to technical teams throughout the country. The cost-shared projects with industry, universities, and other stakeholders will address the challenge of enabling the nation's electric grid to handle increasing amounts of renewable energy.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Leaving on a biofueled jet plane
Researchers at the Energy Biosciences Institute have developed a catalytic process for converting sugarcane biomass into a new class of aviation fuel and lubricant base oils that could help biorefineries achieve net life-cycle greenhouse gas savings of up to 80 percent.
Energy Biosciences Institute, BP

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Jun-2015
Argonne and ASU sign five-year research agreement
Argonne National Laboratory recently signed an agreement with Arizona State University that will facilitate a broad portfolio of research shared between the two institutions. The five-year memorandum of understanding (MOU) will establish a structure for Argonne and ASU to pursue novel research in areas including decision-making based on climate variability and uncertainty, the impacts of global population dynamics and urbanization, the challenges of renewable energy practices, and creating innovative solutions to problems in energy, education and sustainability.

Contact: Greg Cunningham
gcunningham@anl.gov
630-252-8232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Jun-2015
NREL, Clemson University collaborate on wind energy testing facilities
Two of our nation's most advanced wind energy research and test facilities have joined forces to help the wind energy industry improve the performance of wind turbine drivetrains and better understand how the turbines can integrate more effectively with the electrical grid.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Jun-2015
NREL's economic impact tops $872 million
The economic impact of the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) was $872.3 million nationwide in fiscal year 2014, according to a study by the University of Colorado Boulder's Leeds School of Business.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Showing releases 1-25 out of 164.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

 

 

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