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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 101-125 out of 169.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

Public Release: 16-Mar-2014
Nature
Vast gene-expression map yields neurological and environmental stress insights
A consortium led by Berkeley Lab scientists has conducted the largest survey yet of how information encoded in an animal genome is processed in different organs, stages of development, and environmental conditions. Their findings, based on fruit fly research, paint a new picture of how genes function in the nervous system and in response to environmental stress.
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Mar-2014
Nature Geoscience
The rush to rain
A new analysis of satellite data reveals a link between dust in North Africa and West Asia and stronger Indian monsoons. The study in Nature Geoscience shows that dust in the air absorbs sunlight west of India, warming the air and strengthening the winds carrying moisture eastward, raining down in India about a week later. The results explain one way that dust can affect the climate, filling in previously unknown details about the Earth system.
Department of Energy

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Mar-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
A tale of 2 data sets: New DNA analysis strategy helps researchers cut through the dirt
Researchers from Michigan State University, the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, have published the largest soil DNA sequencing effort to date in PNAS. What has emerged in this first of the studies to come from this project is a simple, elegant solution to sifting through the deluge of information gleaned, as well as a sobering reality check on just how hard a challenge these environments will be.
Department of Energy Office of Science, US Department of Agriculture, National Science Foundation, Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
925-296-5643
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 6-Mar-2014
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, March 2014
This release focuses on articles on lighter, stronger engines, safeguarding cyberspace, a Climate Change Science Institute annual report now available, collaborative innovation, and new superhydrophobic glass.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Mar-2014
Vertimass licenses ORNL biofuel-to-hydrocarbon conversion technology
Vertimass LLC has licensed an Oak Ridge National Laboratory technology that directly converts ethanol into a hydrocarbon blend-stock for use in transportation fuels.

Contact: Morgan McCorkle
mccorkleml@ornl.gov
865-574-7308
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Mar-2014
Biomaterials
First look at how Staphylococcus cells adhere to nanostructures could help fight infections
A team of researchers led by Berkeley Lab scientists have explored, for the first time, how individual Staphylococcus cells glom onto metallic nanostructures of various shapes and sizes that are not much bigger than the cells themselves. Their work could lead to a more nuanced understanding of what makes a surface less inviting to bacteria.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 27-Feb-2014
Science Academies explain global warming in 'plain English'
If emissions of greenhouse gases continue in a business-as-usual manner, future changes in climate will substantially exceed those that have occurred so far, with a warming of the Earth in the range of roughly five to nine degrees Fahrenheit by the end of the century.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Feb-2014
Journal of Synchrotron Radiation
Nanoscale freezing leads to better imaging
New X-ray tool allows for more sensitivity to trace metals, such as those that cause cancer, in whole cells and tissues.
National Institutes of Health, Department of Energy

Contact: Tona Kunz
tkunz@anl.gov
630-252-5560
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Feb-2014
Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
It's all water over the dam -- but how and when it falls has huge impact on salmon
By adjusting water discharges in ways designed to boost salmon productivity, officials at a dam in central Washington were able to more than triple the numbers of juvenile salmon downstream of the dam over a 30-year period. The research shows that keeping eggs and young salmon under water at especially vulnerable times boosts survival.
Grant County Public Utility District

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Feb-2014
Nature Geoscience
Volcanoes contribute to recent warming 'hiatus'
Volcanic eruptions in the early part of the 21st century have cooled the planet, according to a study led by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This cooling partly offset the warming produced by greenhouse gases.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Feb-2014
Science
Current ice melt rate in Pine Island Glacier may go on for decades
The Pine Island Glacier, a major outlet of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, has been undergoing rapid melting and retreating for the past two decades. But new research by an international team including researchers from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory shows that this same glacier also experienced rapid thinning about 8,000 years ago.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Feb-2014
Nature Communications
Roots to shoots: Hormone transport in plants deciphered
A new study from a research team led by biochemist Chang-Jun Liu at the US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory identifies the protein essential for relocating cytokinins from roots to shoots.
DOE/Office of Science, National Science Foundation

Contact: Chelsea Whyte
cwhyte@bnl.gov
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 19-Feb-2014
Nature Communications
Pond-dwelling powerhouse's genome points to its biofuel potential
Duckweed is a tiny floating plant that's been known to drive people daffy. It's one of the smallest and fastest-growing flowering plants that often becomes a hard-to-control weed in ponds and small lakes. But it's also been exploited to clean contaminated water and as a source to produce pharmaceuticals. Now, the genome of Greater Duckweed (Spirodela polyrhiza) has given this miniscule plant's potential as a biofuel source a big boost.
DOE/Office of Science, Selman Waksman Chair in Molecular Genetics

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
925-296-5643
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 18-Feb-2014
Science
Study on methane emissions from natural gas systems indicates new priorities
A new study published in the journal Science says that the total impact of switching to natural gas depends heavily on leakage of methane during the natural gas life cycle, and suggests that more can be done to reduce methane emissions and to improve measurement tools which help inform policy choices.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gvo
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Feb-2014
NREL scientist named AAAS Fellow
David S. Ginley, a materials scientist at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory, has been named a fellow of the American Academy for the Advancement of Science, an honor accorded to at most 1 percent of the prestigious scientific society's membership each year. AAAS cited Ginley for 'distinguished contributions in renewable energy and sustainability, especially photovoltaics, batteries and fuel cells, and in developing materials and forums for student interactions on these topics.'
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Feb-2014
Scientific Reports
A battery small enough to be injected, energetic enough to track salmon
Scientists have created a microbattery that packs twice the energy compared to current microbatteries used to monitor the movements of salmon. The battery is just slightly larger than a long grain of rice and can be injected into an organism.
US Army Corps of Engineers Portland District

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Feb-2014
International Union of Crystallography Journal
Superbright and fast X-rays image single layer of proteins
In biology, a protein's shape is key to understanding how it causes disease or toxicity. Researchers who use X-rays to takes snapshots of proteins need a billion copies of the same protein stacked and packed into a neat crystal. Now, scientists using exceptionally bright and fast X-rays can take a picture that rivals conventional methods with a sheet of proteins just one protein molecule thick.
Department of Energy, National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
Department of Energy speakers and sessions at AAAS
Attendees of the 2014 AAAS Annual Meeting are invited to the events at which representatives from DOE's Office of Science and its labs will play an active part.

Contact: Rick Borchelt
rick.borchelt@science.doe.gov
DOE/US Department of Energy

Public Release: 11-Feb-2014
NREL report finds similar value in 2 CSP technologies
Parabolic troughs and dry-cooled towers deliver similar value for concentrating solar power plants, despite different solar profiles, a new report by the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory has found.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Feb-2014
NREL director Arvizu elected to National Academy of Engineering
Dan Arvizu, director of the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory, has been elected to membership in the National Academy of Engineering.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 7-Feb-2014
Physics Review Letters
New application of physics tools used in biology
A Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory physicist and his colleagues have found a new application for the tools and mathematics typically used in physics to help solve problems in biology.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Feb-2014
Science
New insight into an emerging genome-editing tool
A collaboration led by Berkeley Lab's Jennifer Doudna and Eva Nogales has produced the first detailed look at the 3D structure of the Cas9 enzyme and how it partners with guide RNA to interact with target DNA. The results should enhance Cas9's value and versatility as a genome-editing tool.
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, National Science Foundation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Feb-2014
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, February 2014
This release focuses on 1) LEDs to light UT arena. 2) Self-cleaning solar panel. 3) Bioenergy researchers defeating lignin. 4) Protection for utilities. 5) New tool for first responders.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Feb-2014
Molecular Cell
How a shape-shifting DNA-repair machine fights cancer
Maybe you've seen the movies or played with toy Transformers, those shape-shifting machines that morph in response to whatever challenge they face. It turns out that DNA-repair machines in your cells use a similar approach to fight cancer and other diseases, according to new research led by Berkeley Lab scientists.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-484-5956
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 30-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Tracking Asian air pollution aids policymakers
New research from a team of scientists, that included Argonne's David Streets, a senior energy and environmental policy scientist, showed that several different air pollutants from China reach the shores of the western United States. The Chinese-led international research team found that the export of air pollution is tied directly to China's production of consumer goods for export to the United States.
Department of Energy Office of Science, NASA

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Showing releases 101-125 out of 169.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

 

 

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