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US Department of Energy National Science Bowl


Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 26-50 out of 92.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

Public Release: 25-Feb-2014
Portable hydrogen fuel cell unit to provide green, sustainable power to Honolulu port
Clean hydrogen power that's expected to lower emissions and reduce energy consumption will be coming to the Port of Honolulu in 2015 after the completion of a new fuel cell technology demonstration, one that could lead to a commercial technology for ports worldwide.
DOE/Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, DOT/MARAD

Contact: Mike Janes
mejanes@sandia.gov
925-294-2447
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 25-Feb-2014
Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
It's all water over the dam -- but how and when it falls has huge impact on salmon
By adjusting water discharges in ways designed to boost salmon productivity, officials at a dam in central Washington were able to more than triple the numbers of juvenile salmon downstream of the dam over a 30-year period. The research shows that keeping eggs and young salmon under water at especially vulnerable times boosts survival.
Grant County Public Utility District

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 19-Feb-2014
Chemical Communications
ORNL microscopy system delivers real-time view of battery electrochemistry
Using a new microscopy method, researchers can image and measure electrochemical processes in batteries in real time and at nanoscale resolution.

Contact: Morgan McCorkle
mccorkleml@ornl.gov
865-574-7308
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 19-Feb-2014
Nature Communications
Pond-dwelling powerhouse's genome points to its biofuel potential
Duckweed is a tiny floating plant that's been known to drive people daffy. It's one of the smallest and fastest-growing flowering plants that often becomes a hard-to-control weed in ponds and small lakes. But it's also been exploited to clean contaminated water and as a source to produce pharmaceuticals. Now, the genome of Greater Duckweed (Spirodela polyrhiza) has given this miniscule plant's potential as a biofuel source a big boost.
DOE/Office of Science, Selman Waksman Chair in Molecular Genetics

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
925-296-5643
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 18-Feb-2014
Science
Study on methane emissions from natural gas systems indicates new priorities
A new study published in the journal Science says that the total impact of switching to natural gas depends heavily on leakage of methane during the natural gas life cycle, and suggests that more can be done to reduce methane emissions and to improve measurement tools which help inform policy choices.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gvo
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Feb-2014
NREL scientist named AAAS Fellow
David S. Ginley, a materials scientist at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory, has been named a fellow of the American Academy for the Advancement of Science, an honor accorded to at most 1 percent of the prestigious scientific society's membership each year. AAAS cited Ginley for 'distinguished contributions in renewable energy and sustainability, especially photovoltaics, batteries and fuel cells, and in developing materials and forums for student interactions on these topics.'
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Feb-2014
Scientific Reports
A battery small enough to be injected, energetic enough to track salmon
Scientists have created a microbattery that packs twice the energy compared to current microbatteries used to monitor the movements of salmon. The battery is just slightly larger than a long grain of rice and can be injected into an organism.
US Army Corps of Engineers Portland District

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Feb-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
New 'pomegranate-inspired' design solves problems for lithium-ion batteries
A novel battery electrode features silicon nanoparticles clustered like pomegranate seeds in a tough carbon rind. The Stanford/SLAC design could enable smaller, lighter rechargeable batteries for electric cars, cell phones and other devices.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Andy Freeberg
afreeberg@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-4359
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
Berkeley Lab researchers at AAAS 2014
Can more accurate climate models help us understand extreme weather events? Can we use synthetic biology to create better biofuels? These questions, and the ongoing search for Dark Matter and better photovoltaic materials, are just some of the presentations by Lawrence Berkeley National Lab researchers at this year's AAAS meeting.

Contact: Jon Weiner
jrweiner@lbl.gov
510-326-2092
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Feb-2014
NREL report finds similar value in 2 CSP technologies
Parabolic troughs and dry-cooled towers deliver similar value for concentrating solar power plants, despite different solar profiles, a new report by the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory has found.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Feb-2014
NREL director Arvizu elected to National Academy of Engineering
Dan Arvizu, director of the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory, has been elected to membership in the National Academy of Engineering.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Feb-2014
Science
New insight into an emerging genome-editing tool
A collaboration led by Berkeley Lab's Jennifer Doudna and Eva Nogales has produced the first detailed look at the 3D structure of the Cas9 enzyme and how it partners with guide RNA to interact with target DNA. The results should enhance Cas9's value and versatility as a genome-editing tool.
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, National Science Foundation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 5-Feb-2014
Nature Materials
Crossover sound
The first "unambiguous demonstration" of the atomic-scale sound waves known as phonons crossing over from particle-like to wave-like behavior in superlattices opens the door to improved thermoelectrics and possibly even phonon lasers.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Feb-2014
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, February 2014
This release focuses on 1) LEDs to light UT arena. 2) Self-cleaning solar panel. 3) Bioenergy researchers defeating lignin. 4) Protection for utilities. 5) New tool for first responders.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Jan-2014
Nature
Puzzling question in bacterial immune system answered
Berkeley researchers have answered a central question about Cas9, an enzyme that plays an essential role in the bacterial immune system and is fast becoming a valuable tool for genetic engineering: How is Cas9 able to precisely discriminate between non-self DNA that must be degraded and self DNA that may be almost identical within genomes that are millions to billions of base pairs long.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Jan-2014
NREL study: Active power control of wind turbines can improve power grid reliability
The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory, along with partners from the Electric Power Research Institute and the University of Colorado have completed a comprehensive study to understand how wind power technology can assist the power grid by controlling the active power output being placed onto the system. The rest of the power system's resources have traditionally been adjusted around wind to support a reliable and efficient system. The research that led to this report challenges that concept.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Jan-2014
Energy and Building
White, green or black roofs? Berkeley Lab report compares economic payoffs
Looking strictly at the economic costs and benefits of three different roof types -- black, white and "green" (or vegetated) -- Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory researchers have found in a new study that white roofs are the most cost-effective over a 50-year time span. While the high installation cost of green roofs sets them back in economic terms, their environmental and amenity benefits may at least partially mitigate their financial burden.

Contact: Julie Chao
jhchao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Jan-2014
NREL working to clean air in fracking process
A microbe capable of digesting methane could save countless tons of greenhouse gas from reaching the atmosphere during the hydraulic fracturing process. Hydraulic fracturing, also known as fracking, uses pressurized water to fracture rock to release natural gas. It's been a boon to local economies and a source of inexpensive fuels -- but if nothing is done to capture the byproduct methane, which is typically flared in the air, it can also contribute heftily to greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Jan-2014
NREL model licensed to improve accuracy of battery simulations
The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory has licensed its Equivalent Circuit Battery Model to software developer ThermoAnalytics for use in its recently updated RadTherm software package.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Hugging hemes help electrons hop
Researchers simulating how certain bacteria run electrical current through tiny molecular wires have discovered a secret Nature uses for electron travel. This is the first time scientists have seen this evolutionary design principle for electron transport.
US Department of Energy, Royal Society

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Jan-2014
LLNL partnership with Calysta works to convert natural gas to liquid fuel
In an effort to put to good use natural gas (methane) that might otherwise become pollution, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is collaborating with start-up company Calysta Energy on a new technology to convert natural gas to liquid fuel.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Jan-2014
Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics
Argonne scientists discover new pathway for artificial photosynthesis
Currently, the most efficient methods that we have of making fuel -- principally hydrogen -- from sunlight and water involve rare and expensive metal catalysts, like platinum. In a new study, researchers at the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory have found a new, more efficient way to link a less expensive synthetic cobalt-containing catalyst to an organic light-sensitive molecule, called a chromophore.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Jan-2014
Nature Communications
Battery development may extend range of electric cars
Electric cars could travel farther on a single charge and more renewable energy could be saved for a rainy day if lithium-sulfur batteries can last longer. PNNL has developed a novel anode that could quadruple the lifespan of these promising batteries.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Franny White
franny.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Jan-2014
Physical Review Letters
Fusion instabilities lessened by unexpected effect
Introducition of a secondary, weaker magnetic field into a fusion experiment at Sandia's Z machine unexpectedly reduced the plasma disturbance that customarily sinks fusion efforts.
National Nuclear Security Administratoin

Contact: Neal Singer
nsinger@sandia.gov
505-845-7078
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 7-Jan-2014
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, January 2014
This release focuses on: "The road to efficiency"; "Zero Energy Ready Homes"; and "Cross-disciplinary research is yielding new insight into the carbon cycle, contaminated soils and soil fertility."

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Showing releases 26-50 out of 92.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

 

 

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