U.S.Department of Energy Research News
Text-Only | Privacy Policy | Site Map  
Search Releases and Features  
Biological SciencesComputational SciencesEnergy SciencesEnvironmental SciencesPhysical SciencesEngineering and TechnologyNational Security Science

Home
Labs
Multimedia Resources
News Releases
Feature Stories
Library
Contacts
RSS Feed



US Department of Energy National Science Bowl


Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 126-150 out of 284.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 > >>

Public Release: 5-Jan-2016
NREL and CSEM jointly set new efficiency record with dual-junction solar cell
Scientists at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and at the Swiss Center for Electronics and Microtechnology (CSEM) have jointly set a new world record for converting non-concentrated (1-sun) sunlight into electricity using a dual-junction III-V/Si solar cell.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 5-Jan-2016
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, January 2016
January 2016 story tips include: Unmanned Aerial Systems Research Center at ORNL offers world of opportunities; New ORNL material offers clear advantages for consumer products and more; Hospital occupancy data helping ORNL study population distribution; Laser beams, plasmonic sensors able to detect trace biochemical compounds; ORNL devises new tool to map vegetation, wildlife habitat; ORNL software connects dots of disparate data; ORNL breaks mold with steel like none other.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 5-Jan-2016
Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators and Beams
Thor's hammer to crush materials at 1 million atmospheres
Thor, expected to be 40 times more efficient than Sandia's Z machine, the world's largest and most powerful pulsed-power accelerator, is expected to dramatically improve the design of similar machines aiming for high-yield fusion.
Sandia's Laboratory Directed Research and Development office, National Nuclear Security Administration's Science Campaign

Contact: Neal Singer
nsinger@sandia.gov
505-845-7078
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 5-Jan-2016
Nuclear Fusion
PPPL scientists simulate innovative method for starting up tokamaks without using solenoid
Scientists at the US Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory have produced self-consistent computer simulations that capture the evolution of an electric current inside fusion plasma without using a central electromagnet, or solenoid.
US Office of Science

Contact: Raphael Rosen
rrosen@pppl.gov
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Jan-2016
Physical Review Letters
Beam-beam compensation scheme doubles proton-proton collision rates at RHIC
Accelerator physicists at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory have successfully implemented an innovative scheme for increasing proton collision rates at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. More proton collisions produce more data for scientists to sift through to answer important nuclear physics questions, including the search for the source of proton spin.
DOE/Office of Science, US LHC Accelerator Research Program

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Jan-2016
Science
How to train your bacterium
Berkeley Lab researchers are using the bacterium Moorella thermoacetica to perform photosynthesis and also to synthesize semiconductor nanoparticles in a hybrid artificial photosynthesis system for converting sunlight into valuable chemical products.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Jan-2016
Physics Review Letters
Ames Laboratory scientist's calculation featured on cover of Physical Review Letters
Research performed by US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory Associate Scientist Durga Paudyal was recently featured on the cover of the Nov. 13, 2015, issue of Physical Review Letters.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Dec-2015
Small
ORNL cell-free protein synthesis is potential lifesaver
Lives of soldiers and others injured in remote locations could be saved with a cell-free protein synthesis system developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Dec-2015
Nature Plants
A metabolic pathway in cyanobacteria could yield better biofuels and bioproducts from photosynthesis
Scientists from the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory have discovered that a metabolic pathway previously only suggested to be functional in photosynthetic organisms is actually a major pathway and can enable efficient conversion of carbon dioxide to organic compounds.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Dec-2015
Nature Materials
NREL research advances hydrogen production efforts
Researchers at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory have made advances toward affordable photoelectrochemical production of hydrogen.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Dec-2015
ORNL achieves milestone with plutonium-238 sample
With the production of 50 grams of plutonium-238, researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have restored a US capability dormant for nearly 30 years and set the course to provide power for NASA and other missions.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Dec-2015
Journal of Materials Chemistry A
Neutrons offer guide to getting more out of solid-state lithium-ion batteries
A new study conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), has revealed promising results that could drastically boost the performance of solid-state electrolytes, and could potentially lead to a safer, even more efficient battery. Researchers used neutron diffraction (the VULCAN instrument, SNS beam line 7) to conduct an in-depth study probing the entire structure evolution of doped garnet-type electrolytes during the synthesis process to unravel the mechanism that boosts the lithium-ionic conductivity.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Jeremy Rumsey
rumseyjp@ornl.gov
865-574-2038
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Dec-2015
Advanced Energy Materials
New flow battery offers lower-cost energy storage
Renewable energy can be stored for less with PNNL's new organic aqueous flow battery, which uses inexpensive and readily available materials. The new battery is expected to cost about 60 percent less than today's standard flow batteries.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Franny White
franny.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Dec-2015
Energy & Environmental Science
ORNL technique could set new course for extracting uranium from seawater
An ultra-high-resolution technique used for the first time to study polymer fibers that trap uranium in seawater may cause researchers to rethink the best methods to harvest this potential fuel for nuclear reactors.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Dec-2015
Nature Communications
Some like it hot: Simulating single particle excitations
Understanding and manipulating plasmons is important for their potential use in photovoltaics, solar cell water splitting, and sunlight-induced fuel production from CO2. Researchers with Berkeley Lab have used a real-time numerical algorithm to study both the plasmon and hot carrier within the same framework. That is critical for understanding how long a particle stays excited, and whether there is energy backflow from hot carrier to plasmon.
Department of Energy's Office of Science, Joint Center for Artificial Synthesis

Contact: Jon Weiner
jrweiner@lbl.gov
510-486-4014
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Dec-2015
Nature Communications
Diamonds may be the key to future NMR/MRI technologies
Berkeley Lab researchers have demonstrated that diamonds may hold the key to the future for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technologies. NMR/MRI signals were significantly strengthened through the hyperpolarization of carbon-13 nuclei in diamond using microwaves.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Dec-2015
Enlisting distributed energy devices to balance the power grid
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and its partners are developing a unique way to balance the increasingly complex power grid: an incentive-based coordination and control system for distributed energy devices such as rooftop solar panels, batteries and electric vehicles.
DOE/Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy

Contact: Franny White
frances.white@battelle.org
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Dec-2015
New sister Interoperability Center opens in Europe
As global electric vehicle sales continue to rise, the European Union opened the first European Interoperability Center for Electric Vehicles and Smart Grids last month to make sure all of these cars have a standard plug and equipment that can work anywhere.
US Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy's Vehicle Technologies Office, European Commission

Contact: Gregory Cunningham
gcunningham@anl.gov
630-252-8232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Dec-2015
Science Advances
The artificial materials that came in from the cold
Berkeley Lab researchers have developed a freeze-casting technique that enables them to design and create strong, tough and lightweight materials comparable to bones, teeth, shells and wood.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Dec-2015
Titan helps researchers explore explosive star scenarios
A team led by Michael Zingale of Stony Brook University used the Titan supercomputer to complete a three-dimensional, high-resolution investigation of the thermonuclear burning a double-detonation white dwarf undergoes before explosion. The study expands upon the team's initial 3-D simulation of this supernova scenario, which was carried out in 2013.

Contact: Jonathan Hines
hinesjd@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Dec-2015
Industry growth forum fosters cleantech companies
A buzz builds in the corridors of a downtown Denver hotel, the sounds of casual conversations and earnest entrepreneurs. If synapses firing made a noise, it might sound like this, the click of connections being made. Over the course of two days, 30 cleantech entrepreneurs will make their case for funding at this year's Industry Growth Forum (IGF) put on by the Energy Department's National Renewable Laboratory (NREL).

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Dec-2015
NREL estimates economically viable US renewable generation
Analysts at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are providing, for the first time, a method for measuring the economic potential of renewable energy across the United States. A study applying this new method found that renewable energy generation is economically viable in many parts of the United States largely due to rapidly declining technology costs.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Dec-2015
Science
NREL research advances understanding of photoelectrodes
Scientists at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have developed a new probe that could lead to a better photoelectrochemical cell. A paper on the discovery, 'Semiconductor interfacial carrier dynamics via photoinduced electric fields,' was published in Science Magazine.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Dec-2015
Ames Laboratory-developed titanium powder processing gains international customer base
Titanium powder created with Ames Laboratory-developed gas-atomization technology has hit the market. Praxair Inc. now offers fine, spherical titanium powder for additive manufacturing and metal injection molding of aerospace, medical and industrial parts. It marks the first time large-scale amounts of titanium powder are available to industry with a potential for low-cost, high-volume manufacturing.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Public Release: 7-Dec-2015
A cure for medical researchers' big data headache
Oak Ridge Graph Analytics for Medical Innovation (ORiGAMI), supplies researchers with an advanced data tool for literature-based discovery that has the potential to accelerate medical research and discovery. The result of collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the US National Library of Medicine, ORiGAMI unites three emerging technologies that are shaping the future of health care: big data, graph computing, and the Semantic Web.

Contact: Jonathan Hines
hinesjd@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Showing releases 126-150 out of 284.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 > >>

 

 

Text-Only | Privacy Policy | Site Map