U.S.Department of Energy Research News
Text-Only | Privacy Policy | Site Map  
Search Releases and Features  
Biological SciencesComputational SciencesEnergy SciencesEnvironmental SciencesPhysical SciencesEngineering and TechnologyNational Security Science

Home
Labs
Multimedia Resources
News Releases
Feature Stories
Library
Contacts
RSS Feed



US Department of Energy National Science Bowl


Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 51-75 out of 248.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

Public Release: 23-Apr-2015
Optica
ORNL reports method that takes quantum sensing to new level
Thermal imaging, microscopy and ultra-trace sensing could take a quantum leap with a technique being developed at ORNL.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Apr-2015
Nature Communications
Scientists use nanoscale building blocks and DNA 'glue' to shape 3-D superlattices
Taking child's play with building blocks to a whole new level-the nanometer scale-scientists at the US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory have constructed 3-D 'superlattice' multicomponent nanoparticle arrays where the arrangement of particles is driven by the shape of the tiny building blocks. The method uses linker molecules made of complementary strands of DNA to overcome the blocks' tendency to pack together in a way that would separate differently shaped components.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Apr-2015
Nature Communications
New class of 3-D-printed aerogels improve energy storage
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researchers have made graphene aerogel microlattices with an engineered architecture via a 3-D printing technique known as direct ink writing.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Apr-2015
NERSC, Cray move forward with next-generation scientific computing
The US Department of Energy's National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center and Cray Inc. announced today that they have finalized a new contract for a Cray XC40 supercomputer that will be the first NERSC system installed in the newly built Computational Research and Theory facility at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

Contact: Jon Bashor
jbashor@lbl.gov
510-486-5849
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Apr-2015
Bookmark and share printable version assuring solar modules will last for decades
The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory is co-leading an international push to assure the reliability of solar panels -- an assurance demanded by customers, manufacturers, lenders, and utilities.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Apr-2015
NREL releases report describing guidelines for PV manufacturer quality assurance
The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory has released an updated proposal that will establish an international quality standard for photovoltaic (PV) module manufacturing. The document is intended for immediate use by PV manufacturers when producing modules on an industrial scale so they can increase investor, utility, and consumer confidence in PV system performance.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Apr-2015
Nano Letters
Major advance in artificial photosynthesis poses win/win for the environment
By combining biocompatible light-capturing nanowire arrays with select bacterial populations, a potentially game-changing new artificial photosynthesis system offers a win/win situation for the environment: solar-powered green chemistry using sequestered carbon dioxide.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Apr-2015
Green Chemistry
Packing heat: New fluid makes untapped geothermal energy cleaner
More American homes could be powered by the Earth's natural underground heat with a nontoxic fluid that could cut in half the amount of water needed for a new power generation method called enhanced geothermal systems.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Franny White
franny.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Apr-2015
OLCF selects application readiness projects to prepare for Summit supercomputer
Summit, a high-performance computing system set to be delivered to Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 2017 and available to researchers in 2018, will support DOE's Office of Science in its broad science and energy mission.

Contact: Jeff Gary
jeffdgary@ornl.gov
865-574-8066
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Apr-2015
Nature Communications
On the road to spin-orbitronics
Berkeley Lab researchers have discovered a new way of manipulating the magnetic domain walls in ultrathin magnets that could one day revolutionize the electronics industry through a technology called 'spin-orbitronics.'
US Department of Energy

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Apr-2015
Nano Letters
Erupting electrodes: How recharging leaves behind microscopic debris inside batteries
An eruption of lithium at the tip of a battery's electrode, cracks in the electrode's body, and a coat forming on the electrode's surface reveal how recharging a battery many times leads to its demise. Using a powerful microscope to watch multiple cycles of charging and discharging under real battery conditions, researchers have gained insight into the chemistry that clogs rechargeable lithium batteries in work appearing in the March issue of the journal Nano Letters.
Department of Energy

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Apr-2015
Synthetic muscle developed with PPPL scientists' help ready for launch
NASA will launch a rocket containing a synthetic muscle experiment on April 13.

Contact: Jeanne Jackson DeVoe
jeanne@devoecom.com
609-243-2757
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Apr-2015
Nature Communications
Unraveling the origin of the pseudogap in a charge density wave compound
By combining a variety of different experimental techniques and theory, a group led by researchers at the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory obtained unique insights into the nature of the pseudogap state in a canonical charge density wave material.
US Department of Energy Office of Basic Energy Sciences

Contact: Tona Kunz
tkunz@anl.gov
630-252-5560
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Apr-2015
Scientific Data
Accelerating materials discovery with world's largest database of elastic properties
Scientists at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have published the world's largest set of data on the complete elastic properties of inorganic compounds, increasing by an order of magnitude the number of compounds for which such data exists.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Julie Chao
JHChao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 2-Apr-2015
Analytical innovations bring $10 million back to national laboratory, Battelle
A suite of analytical innovations used to detect and measure very low levels of compounds and elements has topped $10 million in licensing income for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and its operator Battelle. It's the first time that income tied to a specific technology developed at PNNL has reached this level.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 31-Mar-2015
Nature Communications
Skin tough
A collaboration of Berkeley Lab and UC San Diego researchers has recorded the first direct observations of the micro-scale mechanisms behind the ability of skin to resist tearing. The results could be applied to the improvement of artificial skin, or to the development of thin film polymers for flexible electronics.
US Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
Journal of Power Sources
Goodbye, range anxiety? Electric vehicles may be more useful than previously thought
In the first study of its kind, scientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory quantitatively show that electric vehicles will meet the daily travel needs of drivers longer than commonly assumed. They found that batteries that have lost 20 percent of their originally rated energy storage capacity can still meet the daily travel needs of more than 85 percent of US drivers.

Contact: Julie Chao
JHChao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Mar-2015
MESA complex starts largest production series in its history
Sandia National Laboratories has begun making silicon wafers for three nuclear weapon modernization programs, the largest production series in the history of its Microsystems and Engineering Sciences Applications complex.

Contact: Sue Holmes
sholmes@sandia.gov
505-844-6362
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 26-Mar-2015
Science
Using magnetic fields to understand high-temperature superconductivity
Taking our understanding of quantum matter to new levels, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory are exposing high-temperature superconductors to very high magnetic fields, changing the temperature at which the materials become perfectly conducting and revealing unique properties of these substances.
National Science Foundation Division of Materials Research, DOE/Office of Science, Florida State University, State of Florida, and Los Alamos National Laboratory/LDRD Program

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Mar-2015
ACS Catalysis
Rare-earth innovation to improve nylon manufacturing
The Critical Materials Institute, a US Department of Energy Innovation Hub led by the Ames Laboratory, has created a new chemical process that makes use of the widely available rare-earth metal cerium to improve the manufacture of nylon.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Laura Millsaps
millsaps@ameslab.gov
515-294-3474
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Mar-2015
Nature Nanotechnology
ORNL-led team demonstrates desalination with nanoporous graphene membrane
Desalination is an energy-intensive process, which concerns those wanting to expand its application. Now, a team of experimentalists led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has demonstrated an energy-efficient desalination technology that uses a porous membrane made of strong, slim graphene -- a carbon honeycomb one atom thick. The results are published in the March 23 advance online issue of Nature Nanotechnology.

Contact: Dawn Levy
levyd@ornl.gov
865-576-6448
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 19-Mar-2015
Sandia showcases biology breakthroughs available for licensing
Technologies developed in Sandia National Laboratories' biosciences program could soon find their way into doctors' offices -- devices like wearable microneedles that continuously analyze electrolyte levels and a lab-on-a-disk that can test a drop of blood for 64 different diseases in minutes. At a recent seminar for potential investors and licensees, part of the Sandia Technology Showcase series, Sandia bioscientists presented eight ready-to-license technologies in three key areas: medical diagnostics, biosurveillance and therapeutics and drug discovery.

Contact: Patti Koning
pkoning@sandia.gov
925-294-4911
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 17-Mar-2015
ORNL and SINAP cooperate on development of salt-cooled reactors
Representatives from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics are meeting at ORNL this week as part of an agreement between the two institutions to work together on the advancement of salt-cooled nuclear reactor technologies.

Contact: Morgan McCorkle
mccorkleml@ornl.gov
865-574-7308
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Mar-2015
Nature
A better way of scrubbing CO2
Berkeley Lab researchers have discovered a means by which the removal of carbon dioxide (CO2) from coal-fired power plants might one day be done far more efficiently and at far lower costs than today. By appending a diamine molecule to the sponge-like solid materials known as metal-organic-frameworks (MOFs), the researchers were able to more than triple the CO2-scrubbing capacity of the MOFs, while significantly reducing parasitic energy.
US Department of Energy Office of Science ARPA-E

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Mar-2015
Nature Communications
Graphene 'gateway' discovery opens possibilities for improved energy technologies
Graphene, a strong, lightweight carbon honeycombed structure, only one atom thick, holds great promise for energy research and development. Recently scientists with the Fluid Interface Reactions, Structures, and Transport Energy Frontier Research Center, led by the US Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, revealed graphene can serve as a proton-selective permeable membrane, providing a new basis for streamlined and more efficient energy technologies such as improved fuel cells.
US Department of Energy's Office of Science

Contact: Dawn Levy
levyd@ornl.gov
865-576-6448
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Showing releases 51-75 out of 248.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

 

 

Text-Only | Privacy Policy | Site Map