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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 51-75 out of 245.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
National Renewable Energy Laboratory updates cetane data used for development of energy efficient fuels and engines
The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory has released a long-anticipated update to the source-of-record for cetane number data. This information is vital to the development of new, energy-efficient, low-carbon fuels and compatible engines. Researchers, as well as members of the engine, vehicle, and fuel industries, rely on these numbers to target compounds for development of new fuels capable of greater energy efficiency, cleaner emissions, and maximum performance in diesel engines.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Sep-2014
Science
A metallic alloy that is tough and ductile at cryogenic temperatures
A multi-element high‐entropy alloy not only tests out as one of the toughest materials on record, but, unlike most materials, the toughness as well as the strength and ductility of this alloy actually improves at cryogenic temperatures.
US Department of Energy's Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Sep-2014
Science
Birth of a mineral
One of the most important molecules on earth, calcium carbonate crystallizes into chalk, shells and minerals the world over. In a study led by the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, researchers used a powerful microscope that allows them to see the birth of crystals in real time, giving them a peek at how different calcium carbonate crystals form, they report in Sept. 5 issue of Science.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Sep-2014
Story from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Sept. 2014
1) Precision projectile tracker. 2) Microscopic needles to imprint the patient's corneal tissue. 3) Connecting vehicles could save nearly 3 billion gallons of fuel. 4) Tiny Titan can help middle and high school students explore the fundamental concepts of parallel computing.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Peptoid nanosheets at the oil-water interface
Researchers at Berkeley Lab's Molecular Foundry have developed peptoid nanosheets that form at the interface between oil and water, opening the door to increased structural complexity and chemical functionality for a broad range of applications.
DOE/Office of Science, Defense Threat Reduction Agency

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Nature Materials
Argonne scientists pioneer strategy for creating new materials
Making something new is never easy. Scientists constantly theorize about new materials, but when the material is manufactured it doesn't always work as expected. To create a new strategy for designing materials, scientists at the Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory combined two different approaches at two different facilities to synthesize new materials. This new strategy gives faster feedback on what growth schemes are best, thus shortening the timeframe to manufacture a new, stable material for energy transport and conversion applications.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Tona Kunz
tkunz@anl.gov
630-252-5560
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Ames Laboratory scientists named 'Most Influential Scientific Minds'
Three Ames Laboratory physicists, Paul Canfield, Sergey Bud'ko, and Costas Soukoulis, were recently named to Thomson Reuters' World's Most Influential Scientific Minds 2014.

Contact: Laura Millsaps
millsaps@ameslab.gov
515-294-3474
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
RSC Advances
Rubber meets the road with new ORNL carbon, battery technologies
Recycled tires could see new life in lithium-ion batteries.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
Competition for graphene
Berkeley Lab reports the first experimental observation of ultrafast charge transfer in photo-excited MX2 materials, the graphene-like two-dimensional semiconductors. Charge transfer time clocked in at under 50 femtoseconds, comparable to the fastest times recorded for organic photovoltaics.

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Nature Communications
Photon speedway puts big data in the fast lane
A series of experiments conducted by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory researchers is shedding new light on the photosynthetic process and also illustrates how light sources and supercomputing facilities can be linked via a 'photon science speedway' to address emerging challenges in massive data analysis.

Contact: Kathy Kincade
kkincade@lbl.gov
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
New process helps overcome obstacles to produce renewable fuels and chemicals
There's an old saying in the biofuels industry: 'You can make anything from lignin except money.' But now, a new study may pave the way to challenging that adage. The study from the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory demonstrates a concept that provides opportunities for the successful conversion of lignin into a variety of renewable fuels, chemicals, and materials for a sustainable energy economy.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Aug-2014
Science
Shaping the future of nanocrystals
Berkeley Lab researchers have recorded the first direct observations of how facets form and develop on platinum nanocubes in solution, pointing the way towards more sophisticated and effective nanocrystal design and revealing that a nearly 150-year-old scientific law describing crystal growth breaks down at the nanoscale.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Aug-2014
Advanced Materials
ORNL scientists uncover clues to role of magnetism in iron-based superconductors
New measurements of atomic-scale magnetic behavior in iron-based superconductors are challenging conventional wisdom about superconductivity and magnetism.
US Department of Energy Office of Science, National Science Foundation

Contact: Morgan McCorkle
mccorkleml@ornl.gov
865-574-7308
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
American Chemical Society 248th National Meeting & Exposition
Journal of American Chemical Society
Water leads to chemical that gunks up biofuels production
Trying to understand the chemistry that turns plant material into the same energy-rich gasoline and diesel we put in our vehicles, researchers have discovered that water in the conversion process helps form an impurity which, in turn, slows down key chemical reactions.
Department of Energy

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 19-Aug-2014
Agewandte Chemie
NMR using Earth's magnetic field
Berkeley Lab researchers carried out nuclear magnetic resonance experiments using an ultra-low magnetic field comparable to Earth's magnetic field.

Contact: Rachel Berkowitz
rberkowitz@lbl.gov
510-486-7254
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Bionic liquids from lignin
Bionic liquids -- solvents made from lignin and hemicellulose, two by-products of biofuel production -- show great promise for liberating fermentable sugars from lignocellulose and improving the economics of biofuels refineries.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Nature Communications
Promising ferroelectric materials suffer from unexpected electric polarizations
Brookhaven Lab scientists find surprising locked charge polarizations that explain the poor performance of next-gen materials that would otherwise revolutionize data-driven devices.
US Department of Energy's Office of Science

Contact: Justin Eure
jeure@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Aug-2014
NERSC launches next-generation code optimization effort
With the promise of exascale supercomputing looming on the horizon, questions about infrastructure and hardware design tend to dominate implementation discussions. But equally important is enabling scientists to adapt their applications to take advantage of exascale. The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center is working to address this question with the NERSC Exascale Science Applications Program, an application readiness effort designed to transition users, and their codes, to next-generation architectures.

Contact: Kathy Kincade
kkincade@lbl.gov
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 12-Aug-2014
Ames Laboratory's Thiel winner of 2014 Welch Award
Pat Thiel has been named the 2014 winner of the American Vacuum Society Medard W. Welch Award, which recognizes outstanding research in the fields of materials, interfaces and processing. Thiel, who is a faculty scientist at the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory and a Distinguished Professor of chemistry at Iowa State University, is recognized for her 'seminal contributions to the understanding of quasicrystalline surfaces and thin-film nucleation and growth.'

Contact: Breehan Gerleman Lucchesi
breehan@ameslab.gov
515-294-9750
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Aug-2014
Two NREL scientists named to highly cited researcher list
Two scientists at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory have been included in Thomson Reuters' Highly Cited Research list for the thousands of citations of their work by fellow researchers over the past decade.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Aug-2014
NREL research earns 2 prestigious R&D 100 Awards
A growth system that can produce thin solar cells quickly and at low cost, and an ultra-efficient supercomputer platform -- both developed or advanced by the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory and its partners -- have been named among this year's most significant innovations by R&D Magazine.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Aug-2014
NREL uses industry best practices to add partners
The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory is accelerating the availability of next-generation energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies in the marketplace by making it easier for industry partners to work with the laboratory.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 5-Aug-2014
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, August 2014
1) Glass used for military vehicle windshields is being put to the test. 2) Tomorrow's commercial refrigeration systems could be cooled by carbon dioxide. 3) Graphite put to the test . 4) Reformulated plant matter could be at the roots of a revolution in 3-D printing. 5) Batteries for cars, phones, and laptop computers could retain their charge and last longer.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Aug-2014
Nature Communications
Bottling up sound waves
Berkeley Lab researchers have developed a technique for generating acoustic bottles in open air that can bend the paths of sound waves along prescribed convex trajectories. These self-bending bottle beams hold promise for ultrasonic imaging and therapy, and acoustic cloaking, levitation and particle manipulation.
Office of Naval Research

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Aug-2014
Nature Communications
Nanoscale details of electrochemical reactions in electric vehicle battery materials
Using a new method to track the electrochemical reactions in a common electric vehicle battery material under operating conditions, scientists have revealed new insight into why fast charging inhibits this material's performance. The results could inform battery makers' efforts to optimize materials for faster-charging batteries with higher capacity.
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory, US Department of Energy

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Showing releases 51-75 out of 245.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

 

 

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