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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 76-100 out of 270.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 > >>

Public Release: 16-Nov-2015
INCITE grants awarded to 56 computational research projects
The US Department of Energy's Office of Science announced 56 projects aimed at accelerating discovery and innovation to address some of the world's most challenging scientific questions. The projects will share 5.8 billion core hours on America's two most powerful supercomputers dedicated to open science.

Contact: Eric Gedenk
gedenked@ornl.gov
865-241-5497
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Nov-2015
Department of Energy's ESnet and NERSC blaze 400G production network path
The Department of Energy's Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) and the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) have built a 400 gigabit-per-second (Gbps) super-channel, the first-ever 400G production link to be deployed by a national research and education network.

Contact: Jon Bashor
jbashor@lbl.gov
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Nov-2015
Small
New electron microscopy method sculpts 3-D structures at atomic level
Electron microscopy researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have developed a unique way to build 3-D structures with finely controlled shapes as small as one to two billionths of a meter.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Morgan McCorkle
mccorkleml@ornl.gov
865-574-7308
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Nov-2015
Nature Communications
A new way to look at MOFs
An international collaboration led by Berkeley Lab's Omar Yaghi has developed a technique called 'gas adsorption crystallography' that provides a new way to study the process by which metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are able to store immense volumes of gases such a carbon dioxide, hydrogen and methane.

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Nov-2015
Analytical Chemistry
New ORNL device combines power of mass spectrometry, microscopy
ORNL device is a potentially huge help for studying chemical interactions, disease, drugs.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 5-Nov-2015
Scientific Reports
Using hydrogen to enhance lithium ion batteries
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory scientists have found that lithium ion batteries operate longer and faster when their electrodes are treated with hydrogen.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 5-Nov-2015
Science
Researchers discover a new dimension to high-temperature superconductivity
A team led by scientists at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory combined powerful magnetic pulses with some of the brightest X-rays on the planet to discover a surprising 3-D arrangement of a material's electrons that appears closely linked to a mysterious phenomenon known as high-temperature superconductivity.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Nov-2015
Scientific Reports
Energy-efficient reaction drives ORNL biofuel conversion technology
A new study from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory explains the mechanism behind a technology that converts bio-based ethanol into hydrocarbon blend-stocks for use as fossil fuel alternatives.

Contact: Morgan McCorkle
mccorkleml@ornl.gov
865-574-7308
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 2-Nov-2015
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, November 2015
New tool developed for inspecting concrete at nuclear power plants; ORNL motor features 3-D printed metallic parts; ORNL technique combines intuition, computational strengths; Trane, ORNL combine to boost rooftop A/C efficiency 20 percent; Titan delivering unprecedented climate modeling; ORNL announces JUMP program to stimulate innovation; Bioenergy researchers closer to defeating lignin.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 30-Oct-2015
Test bed advances Washington state as hotbed of energy innovation
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Washington State University and the University of Washington are teaming develop and test transaction-based controls where buildings and equipment 'speak' to each other to better manage energy use to save energy, money and be responsive to the needs of the power grid.
US Department of Energy's Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Buildings Technology Office, DOE's Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Washington State Department of Commerce

Contact: Susan Bauer
susan.bauer@pnnl.gov
509-372-6083
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 30-Oct-2015
ORNL tires-to-carbon technology licensed to RJ Lee Group
RJ Lee Group has signed an agreement to license an invention developed at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory that converts waste rubber into a valuable energy storage material.

Contact: Morgan McCorkle
mccorkleml@ornl.gov
865-574-7308
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 30-Oct-2015
Nature Communications
Chemical complexity promises improved structural alloys for next-gen nuclear energy
Designing alloys to withstand extreme environments is a fundamental challenge for materials scientists. Energy from radiation can create imperfections in alloys, so researchers in an Energy Frontier Research Center led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory are investigating ways to design structural materials that develop fewer, smaller flaws under irradiation. The key is exploiting the complexity present when alloys are made with equal amounts of up to four different metallic elements.
US Department of Energy Office of Science.

Contact: Dawn Levy
levyd@ornl.gov
865-576-6448
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Oct-2015
Nature Communications
New ORNL catalyst features unsurpassed selectivity
Catalysts that power chemical reactions to produce the nylon used in clothing, cookware, machinery and electronics could get a lift with a new formulation that saves time, energy and natural resources.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Oct-2015
Nature Communications
Battery mystery solved: Microscopy answers longstanding questions about lithium-rich transition metal oxides
Using complementary microscopy and spectroscopy techniques, researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) say they have solved the structure of lithium- and manganese-rich transition metal oxides, a potentially game-changing battery material and the subject of intense debate in the decade since it was discovered.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Julie Chao
jhchao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 27-Oct-2015
'Little Box Challenge' inverters arrive at NREL
Today, 18 finalist teams for the Little Box Challenge, presented by Google and the IEEE Power Electronics Society, converged at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory to have their power inverters tested as part of a $1 million competition to build smaller devices for use in solar power systems.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 27-Oct-2015
NREL releases report card on environmental efforts
The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory continued to improve its environmental protection efforts at its South Table Mountain and National Wind Technology Center sites during 2014 by reducing greenhouse gas emissions, adding bird-safety features to campus structures, and assessing environmental impacts of potential laboratory development.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 27-Oct-2015
Nature
On the road to ANG vehicles
Berkeley Lab researchers have developed metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) that feature flexible gas-adsorbing pores, giving them a high capacity for storing methane. This capability has the potential to help make the driving range of adsorbed-natural-gas (ANG) cars comparable to that of a typical gasoline-powered car.
DOE/ARPA-E

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Oct-2015
Nature Physics
Unraveling the complex, intertwined electron phases in a superconductor
A team led by researchers from Brookhaven Lab and Cornell has characterized a key arrangement of electrons that may impede superconductivity in cuprates. Understanding this 'electron density wave' may lead to ways to suppress or remove it to induce superconductivity, possibly even at room temperature.
DOE Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Oct-2015
Berkeley Lab scientists to help build world's first total-body PET scanner
Scientists from Berkeley Lab have set out to help build the world's first total-body positron emission tomography scanner, a medical imaging device that could change the way cancers and other diseases are diagnosed and treated. The project is a consortium led by a UC Davis research team and includes scientists from Berkeley Lab and the University of Pennsylvania. It's supported by a recently announced five-year, $15.5 million Transformative Research Award from the National Institutes of Health.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Oct-2015
Nature Photonics
Exciting breakthrough in 2-D lasers
An important step towards next-generation ultra-compact photonic and optoelectronic devices has been taken with the realization of a two-dimensional excitonic laser. Berkeley Lab researchers have embedded a monolayer of tungsten disulfide into a special microdisk resonator to achieve bright excitonic lasing at visible light wavelengths.
US Air Force Office of Scientific Research, DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Oct-2015
Physical Review Letters
Scientists gain insight into origin of tungsten-ditelluride's magnetoresistance
Two new significant findings may move scientists closer to understanding the origins of tungsten-ditelluride's (WTe2) extremely large magnetoresistance, a key characteristic in modern electronic devices like magnetic hard drives and sensors. Scientists in Illinois recently discovered that tungsten-ditelluride (WTe2) is electronically three-dimensional with a low anisotropy.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 19-Oct-2015
Scientific Reports
Solvents save steps in solar cell manufacturing
Advances in ultrathin films have made solar panels and semiconductor devices more efficient and less costly, and researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory say they've found a way to manufacture the films more easily, too.
Basic Energy Sciences

Contact: Jeremy Rumsey
rumseyjp@ornl.gov
865-576-2038
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 19-Oct-2015
Nature Physics
'Molecular accordion' drives thermoelectric behavior in promising material
Engines, laptops and power plants generate waste heat. Thermoelectric materials, which convert temperature gradients to electricity and vice versa, can recover some of that heat and improve energy efficiency. A team of scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory explored the fundamental physics of the world's best thermoelectric material -- tin selenide -- using neutron scattering and computer simulations. Their work may aid energy sustainability and design of materials that convert heat into electricity.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Dawn Levy
levyd@ornl.gov
865-576-6448
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Oct-2015
Nature Communications
Is black phosphorus the next big thing in materials?
Berkeley Lab researchers have confirmed that single-crystal black phosphorus nanoribbons display a strong in-plane anisotropy in thermal conductivity, an experimental revelation that should facilitate the future application of this highly promising material to electronic, optoelectronic and thermoelectric devices.
US Department of Energy's Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Oct-2015
SC15
Nanoelectronics researchers employ Titan for an electrifying simulation speedup
A team led by ETH Zurich's Mathieu Luisier used the Titan supercomputer to improve size and speed of nanoelectronics models.
US Department of Energy, ETH Zurich, CSCS

Contact: Eric Gedenk
gedenked@ornl.gov
865-241-5497
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Showing releases 76-100 out of 270.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 > >>

 

 

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