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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 114.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Public Release: 7-Oct-2014
NREL software tool a boon for wind industry
Wind energy is blowing away skeptics -- it's so close to achieving cost parity with fossil fuels that just a little extra efficiency is all that is likely needed to push it into the mainstream and past the Energy Department's goal of 20 percent wind energy by 2030.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 7-Oct-2014
Bio researchers receive patent to fight superbugs
Superbugs, antibiotic-resistant bacteria, have been on the rise since antibiotics were first introduced 80 years ago. That's because these germ-fighting agents have lost their punch from being overprescribed and misused, allowing bacteria pathogens to develop immunities against them.

Contact: Ken Ma
ma28@llnl.gov
925-423-7602
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Oct-2014
Nature Climate Change
Livermore scientists suggest Southern Hemisphere ocean warming underestimated
Using satellite observations and a large suite of climate models, Lawrence Livermore scientists have found that long-term ocean warming in the upper 700 meters has likely been underestimated.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Oct-2014
Biogeochemistry
Argonne researchers create more accurate model for greenhouse gases from peatlands
Scientists at Argonne have created a new model to more accurately describe the greenhouse gases likely to be released from Arctic peatlands as they warm.
United States Department of Energy's Office of Science, National Science Foundation, United States Geological Survey Climate Research & Development Program, United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service

Contact: Brian Grabowski
media@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 1-Oct-2014
Nature
Team advances understanding of the Greenland Ice Sheet's meltwater channels
A paper in Nature this week notes that observations of moulins (vertical conduits connecting water on top of the glacier down to the bed of the ice sheet) and boreholes in Greenland show that subglacial channels ameliorate the speedup caused by water delivery to the base of the ice sheet in the short term. By mid summer, however, the channels stabilize and are unable to grow any larger.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Microbiome
MaxBin: Automated sorting through metagenomes
MaxBin is an automated software program for binning the genomes of individual microbial species from metagenomic sequences developed at the Joint BioEnergy Institute.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
2015 DOE JGI's science portfolio delves deeper into the Earth's data mine
In selecting 32 new projects with samples from diverse environments for the 2015 Community Science Program (CSP), the Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute shifts 'from solving an organism's genome sequence to enabling an understanding of what this information enables organisms to do.' The total allocation of the CSP 2015 portfolio is expected to exceed 60 trillion bases -- the equivalent of 20,000 human genomes of plant, fungal and microbial genome sequences.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 23-Sep-2014
Interactive map reveals rooftop reflectance for 5 California cities
Berkeley Lab scientists use aerial imagery to create an interactive map that displays the solar reflectance (also known as albedo) of individual roofs in Bakersfield, Long Beach, Los Angeles, San Francisco, and San Jose.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
eLife
Decoding virus-host interactions in the oxygen-starved ocean
In certain coastal areas, severe reductions in oxygen levels in the water destroy food web structure. Over the past 50 years, such oxygen minimum zones have expanded due to climate change and increased waste run-off. Reported in the journal eLife, a collaboration between researchers from the Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute, the University of British Columbia, and University of Arizona studied how viral infection influences a microbial community in one such OMZ.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 12-Sep-2014
Ahoy, offshore wind: Research buoys bring vital data to untapped energy resource
Starting in November, two 20,000-pound buoys decked out with the latest in meteorological and oceanographic equipment will be deployed for a year at two offshore wind demonstration projects: one near Coos Bay, Ore., and another near Virginia Beach, Va. The bright yellow buoys -- each worth $1.3 million -- are being commissioned by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and will enable more accurate predictions of the power-producing potential of winds that blow off US shores.
Department of Energy

Contact: Franny White
franny.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
PPPL scientists take key step toward solving a major astrophysical mystery
Magnetic reconnection can trigger geomagnetic storms that disrupt cell phone service, damage satellites and black out power grids. But how reconnection, in which the magnetic field lines in plasma snap apart and violently reconnect, transforms magnetic energy into explosive particle energy remains a major unsolved problem in plasma astrophysics.
US Department of Energy as well, Center for Magnetic Self-Organization

Contact: John Greenwald
jgreenwa@pppl.gov
609-243-2672
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
Crystal Solar and NREL team up to cut costs
A faster, cheaper way to manufacture silicon solar cells, partially funded by the Energy Department and fine-tuned at its National Renewable Energy Laboratory, has won a coveted R&D 100 award as one of the top technology innovations of 2013.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
National Renewable Energy Laboratory updates cetane data used for development of energy efficient fuels and engines
The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory has released a long-anticipated update to the source-of-record for cetane number data. This information is vital to the development of new, energy-efficient, low-carbon fuels and compatible engines. Researchers, as well as members of the engine, vehicle, and fuel industries, rely on these numbers to target compounds for development of new fuels capable of greater energy efficiency, cleaner emissions, and maximum performance in diesel engines.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Science
Home is where the microbes are
A study published today in Science reports provides a detailed analysis of the microbes that live in houses and apartments. The study was conducted by researchers from the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Chicago.
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, National Institutes of Health, US Environmental Protection Agency, National Science Foundation

Contact: Brian Grabowski
bgrabowski@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Aug-2014
Nature Genetics
Signatures of selection inscribed on poplar genomes
In a study published ahead online Aug. 24, 2014 in Nature Genetics, a team of researchers from Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute, and West Virginia University used a combination of genome-wide selection scans and analyses to understand the processes involved in shaping the genetic variation of natural poplar (Populus trichocarpa) populations. The approach applied genomics to ecological questions, and could help developing more accurate predictive climate change models.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
925-296-5643
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 19-Aug-2014
New project is the ACME of addressing climate change
High performance computing will be used to develop and apply the most complete climate and Earth system model to address the most challenging and demanding climate change issues.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Aug-2014
NREL uses industry best practices to add partners
The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory is accelerating the availability of next-generation energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies in the marketplace by making it easier for industry partners to work with the laboratory.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 5-Aug-2014
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, August 2014
1) Glass used for military vehicle windshields is being put to the test. 2) Tomorrow's commercial refrigeration systems could be cooled by carbon dioxide. 3) Graphite put to the test . 4) Reformulated plant matter could be at the roots of a revolution in 3-D printing. 5) Batteries for cars, phones, and laptop computers could retain their charge and last longer.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Aug-2014
Nature Geoscience
Scientists uncover combustion mechanism to better predict warming by wildfires
Scientists have uncovered key attributes of so-called 'brown carbon' from wildfires, airborne atmospheric particles that may have influenced current climate models that failed to take the material's warming effects into account. The work was described by a collaborative team of researchers from Los Alamos National Laboratory, Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Montana in the journal Nature Geosciences this week.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Jul-2014
International Symposium on Combustion
Fuel efficiency, biofuels, climate change to be explored by world's leading combustion scientists
Nearly 1,500 of the world's foremost fuels and combustion scientists and engineers will gather in San Francisco on Aug. 3-8 for the 35th International Symposium on Combustion, a biennial event sponsored by the Combustion Institute and locally organized this year by Sandia National Laboratories that will examine issues related to climate change, fuel efficiency, biofuels integration with combustion engines and other topics.

Contact: Mike Janes
mejanes@sandia.gov
925-294-2447
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
NREL and General Motors announce R&D partnership to reduce cost of automotive fuel cells
The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory and General Motors are partnering on a multiyear, multimillion dollar joint effort to accelerate the reduction of automotive fuel cell stack costs through fuel cell material and manufacturing research and development. Most major automakers, including GM, have made significant progress in the development of fuel cell electric vehicles, but achieving commercial deployment with global impact will require further cost reductions.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
Campus showcases high-performance buildings
Researchers at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory are transforming the way the world uses energy -- and those transformations become apparent the moment one sets foot on the NREL campus in Golden, Colorado. Here, research teams have applied their expertise to develop office and laboratory spaces that also serve as demonstrations for how high-performance, sustainable buildings and campuses should be designed, constructed, and operated.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
NREL bolsters batteries with nanotubes
Researchers at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory are turning to extremely tiny tubes and rods to boost power and durability in lithium-ion batteries, the energy sources for cell phones, laptops, and electric vehicles. If successful, the batteries will last longer and perform better, leading to a cost advantage for electric vehicles.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
NREL supercomputer tackles grid challenges
'Big data' is playing an increasingly big role in the renewable energy industry and the transformation of the nation's electrical grid, and no single entity provides a better tool for such data than the Energy Department's Energy Systems Integration Facility located on the campus of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gvo
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Treading into a gray area along the spectrum of wood decay fungi
A fungus that can break down all the components of plant cell walls is considered a white rot fungus. If it can only break down cellulose and hemicellulose, it's a brown rot fungus. In the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a team led by DOE Joint Genome Institute fungal researchers suggests that categorizing wood-decaying fungi may be more complicated, broadening the range of fungal decay strategies to be explored for commercializing biofuels production.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
925-296-5643
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Showing releases 1-25 out of 114.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

 

 

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