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US Department of Energy National Science Bowl


Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 26-50 out of 112.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Public Release: 31-Mar-2016
Agewandte Chemie
Proving the genetic code's flexibility
Three-letter codons in a genome sequence can represent one of the 20 regularly used amino acids or stops. In the journal Angewandte Chemie International Ed., researchers from the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute and Yale University have discovered that microorganisms recognize more than one codon for selenocysteine. The finding adds credence to recent studies indicating that an organism's genetic vocabulary is not as constrained as had been long held.
DOE Office of Science, National Institute for General Medical Sciences

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 30-Mar-2016
Nature Communications
Revealing the fluctuations of flexible DNA in 3-D
Scientists have captured the first high-resolution 3-D images from individual double-helix DNA segments attached to gold nanoparticles, which could aid in the use of DNA segments as building blocks for molecular devices that function as nanoscale drug-delivery systems, markers for biological research, and components for electronic devices.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Mar-2016
City resilience: Sandia analyzes effects of rising sea levels in Norfolk
Sandia National Laboratories created an Urban Resilience Analysis Process to help cities become more resilient. The process is a holistic framework that includes Sandia's critical infrastructure modeling and simulation tools, risk consequence assessment and systems analysis expertise to show cities the most effective investments they can make to become more resilient.

Contact: Heather Clark
hclark@sandia.gov
505-844-3511
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 24-Mar-2016
Science
Scientists part the clouds on how droplets form
A new Berkeley Lab study reveals that much more is happening at the microscopic level of cloud formation than previously thought. The findings could help improve the accuracy of climate change models.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Sarah Yang
scyang@lbl.gov
510-486-4575
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Mar-2016
NREL's capabilities boost a wide range of innovative ARPA-E research
The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) will play key roles in a variety of projects recently funded by the Department's Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E). NREL's innovative approaches have received five awards across three different ARPA-E programs for advancing transformational technologies to generate, store, and use energy more efficiently, at lower costs and with reduced emissions.
DOE/ARPA-E

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Mar-2016
Analytical Chemistry
Lighting up disease-carrying mosquitoes
Robert Meagher, a chemical engineer at Sandia National Laboratories, has developed a simple technique for simultaneously detecting RNA from West Nile and chikungunya virus in samples from mosquitoes. He is now working to add the ability to screen for Zika virus.

Contact: Patti Koning
pkoning@sandia.gov
925-294-4911
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 16-Mar-2016
Advanced Energy Materials
Advanced energy storage material gets unprecedented nanoscale analysis
Researchers have combined advanced in-situ microscopy and theoretical calculations to uncover important clues to the properties of a promising next-generation energy storage material for supercapacitors and batteries.

Contact: Bill Cabage
cabagewh@ornl.gov
865-574-4399
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Mar-2016
Nature Geoscience
Nature study reveals rapid ice-wedge loss across Arctic
Permafrost covers a considerable part of the Arctic; it's been thawing in recent decades, releasing greenhouse gases. New research reveals that similarly ancient ice wedges that form the prevalent honeycomb pattern across the tundra appear to be melting rapidly across the Arctic.
DOE Office of Science

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Mar-2016
PLOS ONE
Microbes may not be so adaptable to climate change
Microbes in soil -- organisms that exert enormous influence over our planet's carbon cycle -- may not be as adaptable to climate change as most scientists have presumed.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Mar-2016
PNNL gives a helping hand to small green businesses
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory will help three small businesses reduce the cost of hydropower, cut building energy use, and make adhesives from plants through new projects announced today by DOE's Small Business Vouchers program.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Franny White
franny.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Mar-2016
DOE-funded Bioenergy Research Centers file 500th invention disclosure
Three US Department of Energy-funded research centers are making progress on a shared mission to develop technologies that will bring advanced biofuels to the marketplace, reporting today the disclosure of their 500th invention.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Morgan McCorkle
mccorkleml@ornl.gov
865-574-7308
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Mar-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Cloudy problems: Today's clouds might not be the same as pre-industrial ones
Clouds are notoriously hard to simulate in computer programs that model climate. A new study in the Proceedings on the National Academy of Sciences Early Edition suggests why -- either clouds are more variable than scientists give them credit for, or those bright white clouds in the sky are much dirtier than scientists thought.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Mar-2016
Climate Dynamics
(Rain)cloud computing: Researchers work to improve how we predict climate change
At Argonne National Laboratory, two scientists work on simulations that project what the climate will look like 100 years from now. Last year, they completed the highest-resolution climate forecast ever done for North America, dividing the continent into squares just over seven miles on a side -- far more detailed than the standard 30 to 60 miles.
US Department of Defense's Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program

Contact: Brian Grabowski
bgrabowski@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 2-Mar-2016
Green Chemistry
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, March 2016
March 2016 story tips includes: 'Simulation results could lead to lower production costs for biofuels'; 'New app provides fuel economy information and more to buyers on the go'; 'ORNL supercomputer, SNS offer insight into disease'; and 'Advanced heat pump provides hot savings.'

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 1-Mar-2016
Belgium's Red Electrical Devils win $1 million for innovative inverter design
Google and IEEE announced today that Belgium's Red Electrical Devils, a team from CE+T Power, has won the Little Box Challenge, a competition to invent a much smaller inverter for interconnecting solar power systems to the power grid. The success earned the team a $1 million prize while proving that inverters can be the size of a tablet or smaller rather than the size of a picnic cooler, more than a factor of 10 reduction in size.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 1-Mar-2016
Ridgeview Classical Charter Schools wins 26th Colorado Science Bowl
Students from Ridgeview Classical Charter Schools won the Colorado High School Science Bowl. They will represent the state of Colorado at the US Department of Energy's National Science Bowl in Washington, D.C., April 28-May 2, where they will compete against more than 400 students from 70 high schools for the national title.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Feb-2016
Cyclotron Road announces the selection of its second cohort of innovators
Today, Berkeley Lab's Cyclotron Road program announced the selection of its second cohort of innovators, whose projects include next generation batteries, advanced materials, biomanufacturing, and solar technologies. Cyclotron Road recruits entrepreneurial researchers and embeds them at Berkeley Lab for up to two years in a mentored technology entrepreneurship program.
Dept. of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's Advanced Manufacturing Office

Contact: Jon Weiner
jrweiner@lbl.gov
510-486-4014
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Feb-2016
Science
Synchronized leaf aging in the Amazon responsible for seasonal increases in photosynthesis
High-tech photography in the Amazon reveals that young leaves grow in at the same times as older ones perish, in strong contrast to temperate forests in North America or Europe, resulting in seasonal increases in photosynthesis that must be taken into account to build more accurate climate models.
National Science Foundation, NASA Terra-Aqua Science, GoAmazon Project, US Department of Energy, Brazilian State Science Foundations/Sao Paolo & Amazônas

Contact: Chelsea Whyte
cwhyte@bnl.gov
631-344-8671
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Feb-2016
Journal of Geophysical Research - Space Physics
Study finds surprising variability in shape of Van Allen Belts
The shape of the two electron swarms 600 miles to more than 25,000 miles from the Earth's surface, known as the Van Allen Belts, could be quite different than has been believed for decades, according to a new study of data from NASA's Van Allen Probes that was released Friday in the Journal of Geophysical Research.

Contact: Laura Mullane
mullane@lanl.gov
505-667-6012
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Feb-2016
Science
Biofuel tech straight from the farm
Nature's figured it out already, how to best break down food into fuel. Now scientists have caught up, showing that fungi found in the guts of goats, horses and sheep could help fill up your gas tank too.
US Department of Energy Office of Science, US Department of Agriculture, Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies

Contact: Eric Francavilla
eric.francavilla@pnnl.gov
509-372-4066
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Feb-2016
Algal Research
Renewable fuels from algae boosted by NREL refinery process
A new biorefinery process developed by scientists at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has proven to be significantly more effective at producing ethanol from algae than previous research.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Feb-2016
Ice sheet modeling of Greenland, Antarctica helps predict sea-level rise
Predicting the expected loss of ice sheet mass is difficult due to the complexity of modeling ice sheet behavior. To better understand this loss, a team of Sandia National Laboratories researchers has been improving the reliability and efficiency of computational models that describe ice sheet behavior and dynamics. This research is part of a five-year project called Predicting Ice Sheet and Climate Evolution at Extreme Scales, funded by the US Department of Energy's Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing program.

Contact: Michael Padilla
mjpadil@sandia.gov
925-294-2447
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 8-Feb-2016
NREL patents method for continuous monitoring of materials during manufacturing
The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) was recently issued a patent for a novel method that rapidly characterizes specialized materials during the manufacturing process. This approach significantly improves on standard quality control techniques by allowing for complete monitoring of materials without interrupting workflow.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Feb-2016
Nature Structural & Molecular Biology
Scientists propose 'pumpjack' mechanism for splitting and copying DNA
New close-up images of the proteins that copy DNA inside the nucleus of a cell have led a team of scientists to propose a brand new mechanism for how this molecular machinery works. The scientists studied proteins from yeast cells, which share many features with the cells of complex organisms such as humans, and could offer new insight into ways that DNA replication can go awry.
National Institutes of Health, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Brookhaven Lab Biology Department

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Feb-2016
Journal of American Chemical Society
Scientists take key step toward custom-made nanoscale chemical factories
Scientists have for the first time reengineered a building block of a geometric nanocompartment that occurs naturally in bacteria to give it a new function.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Showing releases 26-50 out of 112.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

 

 

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