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DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 45.

1 | 2 > >>

Public Release: 26-Aug-2015
Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry
ORNL chemical sampling interface features simplicity, speed
In mere seconds, a device that can identify and characterize a solid or liquid sample.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Aug-2015
Nature
Scientists discover atomic-resolution details of brain signaling
Scientists have revealed never-before-seen details of how our brain sends rapid-fire messages between its cells. They mapped the 3-D atomic structure of a two-part protein complex that controls the release of signaling chemicals, called neurotransmitters, from brain cells. Understanding how cells release those signals in less than one-thousandth of a second could help launch a new wave of research on drugs for treating brain disorders.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Aug-2015
Sandia teams with industry to improve human-data interaction
Sandia National Laboratories and EyeTracking Inc. are researching computer information systems to make national security analysts better at getting meaningful information from large data sets coming in quickly in high-stress environments.

Contact: Heather Clark
hclark@sandia.gov
505-844-3511
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 3-Aug-2015
Cell Host & Microbe
Gut microbes affect circadian rhythms in mice, study says
A study including researchers from the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Chicago found evidence that gut microbes affect circadian rhythms and metabolism in mice.

Contact: Brian Grabowski
bgrabowski@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Jul-2015
Nature
Long-sought discovery fills in missing details of cell 'switchboard'
A biomedical breakthrough in the journal Nature reveals never-before-seen details of the human body's cellular switchboard that regulates sensory and hormonal responses. The work is based on an X-ray laser experiment at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
glennr@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-4496
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Jun-2015
ACS Environmental Science and Technology
Argonne analysis shows increased carbon intensity from Canadian oil sands
The US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory this week released a study that shows gasoline and diesel refined from Canadian oil sands has a higher carbon impact than fuels derived from conventional domestic crude sources.
Bioenergy Technologies Office and Vehicle Technologies Office within US Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

Contact: Gregory Cunningham
gcunningham@anl.gov
630-252-8232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Jun-2015
Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry
New tool on horizon for surgeons treating cancer patients
Surgeons could know while their patients are still on the operating table if a tissue is cancerous, according to researchers from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Brigham and Women's Hospital/Harvard Medical School.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Jun-2015
Chemical Physics Letters
Unravelling the mysteries of carbonic acid
Berkeley Lab researchers report the first detailed characterization of the hydration structure of carbonic dioxide gas as it dissolves in water to form carbonic acid. Though carbonic acid exists for only a fraction of a second, it imparts a lasting impact on Earth's atmosphere and geology, and on the human body.

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
Argonne confirms new commercial method for producing medical isotope
Argonne National Laboratory recently demonstrated a new commercial technique for producing molybdenum-99, a critical medical isotope used in millions of imaging procedures each year. The technique, developed by SHINE Medical Technologies, could help secure a domestic source for Mo-99.
National Nuclear Security Administration

Contact: Greg Cunningham
gcunningham@anl.gov
630-252-8232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015
BMJ Open
Researchers correlate rheumatoid arthritis and giant cell arteritis with solar cycles
A rare collaboration of physicists and medical researchers finds a correlation between rheumatoid arthritis and giant cell arteritis and solar cycles.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, NASA, US Department of Energy

Contact: John Greenwald
jgreenwa@pppl.gov
609-243-2672
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Jun-2015
Argonne and ASU sign five-year research agreement
Argonne National Laboratory recently signed an agreement with Arizona State University that will facilitate a broad portfolio of research shared between the two institutions. The five-year memorandum of understanding (MOU) will establish a structure for Argonne and ASU to pursue novel research in areas including decision-making based on climate variability and uncertainty, the impacts of global population dynamics and urbanization, the challenges of renewable energy practices, and creating innovative solutions to problems in energy, education and sustainability.

Contact: Greg Cunningham
gcunningham@anl.gov
630-252-8232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-May-2015
Journal of Synchrotron Radiation
On-demand X-rays at synchrotron light sources
Researchers at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source have developed an 'X-rays on demand' technique in which ALS users can have access to the X-ray beams they want without affecting beams for other users.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-May-2015
Nano Letters
CLAIRE brings electron microscopy to soft materials
Berkeley Lab researchers, working at the Molecular Foundry, have invented a technique called 'CLAIRE' that extends the incredible resolution of electron microscopy to the noninvasive nanoscale imaging of soft matter, including biomolecules.
US Department of Energy Office of Science, National Science Foundation

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-May-2015
Blood
Starving cancer cells instead of feeding them poison
An enzyme-drug that prevents the essential nutrient asparagine from reaching cancer cells seem an effective way to kill them, but that enzyme-drug also does away with the nutrient glutamine that all cells need. Now a simulation has directed the mutation of the enzyme so that, in wet labs, it left normal cells unharmed in Petri dishes and cancer cells dead in test tubes. Lab tests are underway with mice. If successful, human tests are next.
Sandia National Laboratories' Laboratory-Directed Research and Development

Contact: Neal Singer
nsinger@sandia.gov
505-845-7078
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 6-May-2015
Pacific Northwest National Lab, Oregon Health & Science U team up for biomed research
The Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Oregon Health & Science University in Portland, Oregon, are joining forces to answer some of the world's most complex biomedical questions.

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Apr-2015
Cell
X-ray study may aid in designing better blood pressure drugs
An experiment at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has revealed in atomic detail how a hypertension drug binds to a cellular receptor that plays a key role in regulating blood pressure. The results could help scientists design new drugs that better control blood pressure while limiting side effects.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Apr-2015
Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells
New 'cool roof time machine' will accelerate cool roof deployment
A collaboration led by Berkeley Lab scientists has established a method to simulate in the lab the soiling and weathering of roofing materials, reproducing in only a few days the solar reflectance of roofing products naturally aged for three years. Now this protocol has been approved by American Society for Testing and Materials International as a standard practice for the industry.
US Deptartment of Energy

Contact: Julie Chao
JHChao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
X-ray ptychography, fluorescence microscopy combo sheds new light on trace elements
Scientists have developed a new approach that combines ptychographic X-ray imaging and fluorescence microscopy to study the important role trace elements play in biological functions on hydrated cells.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Energy, National Center for Research Resources

Contact: Tona Kunz
tkunz@anl.gov
630-252-5560
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Apr-2015
Synthetic muscle developed with PPPL scientists' help ready for launch
NASA will launch a rocket containing a synthetic muscle experiment on April 13.

Contact: Jeanne Jackson DeVoe
jeanne@devoecom.com
609-243-2757
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Apr-2015
Nature
Improved understanding of protein complex offers insight into DNA replication initiation mechanism basics
A clearer understanding of the origin recognition complex -- a protein complex that directs DNA replication -- through its crystal structure offers new insight into fundamental mechanisms of DNA replication initiation. This will also provide insight into how ORC may be compromised in a subset of patients with Meier-Gorlin syndrome, a form of dwarfism in humans.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Energy

Contact: Tona Kunz
tkunz@anl.gov
630-252-5560
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 2-Apr-2015
Analytical innovations bring $10 million back to national laboratory, Battelle
A suite of analytical innovations used to detect and measure very low levels of compounds and elements has topped $10 million in licensing income for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and its operator Battelle. It's the first time that income tied to a specific technology developed at PNNL has reached this level.

Contact: Greg Koller
greg.koller@pnnl.gov
509-372-4864
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 19-Mar-2015
Sandia showcases biology breakthroughs available for licensing
Technologies developed in Sandia National Laboratories' biosciences program could soon find their way into doctors' offices -- devices like wearable microneedles that continuously analyze electrolyte levels and a lab-on-a-disk that can test a drop of blood for 64 different diseases in minutes. At a recent seminar for potential investors and licensees, part of the Sandia Technology Showcase series, Sandia bioscientists presented eight ready-to-license technologies in three key areas: medical diagnostics, biosurveillance and therapeutics and drug discovery.

Contact: Patti Koning
pkoning@sandia.gov
925-294-4911
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 18-Mar-2015
Nucleic Acids Research
Los Alamos creates bioinformatics tool for metagenome analysis
Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed a new method for DNA analysis of microbial communities such as those found in the ocean, the soil, and our own guts.
Defense Threat Reduction Agency/Chemical and Biological Technologies-Joint Science and Technology Office

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Mar-2015
Scientific Reports
New clues about the risk of cancer from low-dose radiation
Berkeley Lab scientists studied mice and found their risk of mammary cancer from low-dose radiation depends a great deal on their genetic makeup. They also learned key details about how genes and the cells immediately surrounding a tumor (also called the tumor microenvironment) affect cancer risk.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Mar-2015
Argonne research expanding from injectors to inhalers
In collaboration with Australian researchers, Argonne's scientists are using decades of experience analyzing vehicle fuel injectors to study medical inhalers, hoping to unlock the secrets of the devices that are so well known to asthma sufferers everywhere.

Contact: Greg Cunningham
gcunningham@anl.gov
630-252-8232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Showing releases 1-25 out of 45.

1 | 2 > >>

 

 

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