U.S.Department of Energy Research News
Text-Only | Privacy Policy | Site Map  
Search Releases and Features  
Biological SciencesComputational SciencesEnergy SciencesEnvironmental SciencesPhysical SciencesEngineering and TechnologyNational Security Science

Home
Labs
Multimedia Resources
News Releases
Feature Stories
Library
Contacts
RSS Feed



US Department of Energy National Science Bowl


Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 31.

1 | 2 > >>

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Science
Collaboration drives achievement in protein structure research
When this week's print issue of the journal Science comes out, a collective cheer will go up from New Mexico, Montana and even the Netherlands, thanks to the type of collaborative effort that is more and more the norm in these connected times.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Nature
X-rays unlock a protein's SWEET side
Understanding just how sugar makes its way into the cell could lead to the design of better drugs for diabetes patients and an increase in the amount of fruits and vegetables farmers are able to grow. Stanford University researchers have recently uncovered one of these 'pathways' into the cell by piecing together proteins slightly wider than the diameter of a strand of spider silk.
US Department of Energy, National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: Tona Kunz
tkunz@anl.gov
630-252-5560
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
eLife
Decoding virus-host interactions in the oxygen-starved ocean
In certain coastal areas, severe reductions in oxygen levels in the water destroy food web structure. Over the past 50 years, such oxygen minimum zones have expanded due to climate change and increased waste run-off. Reported in the journal eLife, a collaboration between researchers from the Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute, the University of British Columbia, and University of Arizona studied how viral infection influences a microbial community in one such OMZ.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 3-Sep-2014
Story from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Sept. 2014
1) Precision projectile tracker. 2) Microscopic needles to imprint the patient's corneal tissue. 3) Connecting vehicles could save nearly 3 billion gallons of fuel. 4) Tiny Titan can help middle and high school students explore the fundamental concepts of parallel computing.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Cell Host & Microbe
Study reveals how Ebola blocks immune system
Researchers have identified one way the Ebola virus dodges the body's antiviral defenses, providing important insight that could lead to new therapies.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Brian Grabowski
media@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Bone
Revealing a novel mode of action for an osteoporosis drug
Raloxifene is a US Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment for decreasing fracture risk in osteoporosis. While raloxifene is as effective at reducing fracture risk as other current treatments, this works only partially by suppressing bone loss. X-ray studies revealed an additional mechanism underlying raloxifene action, providing an explanation for how this drug can achieve equivalent clinical benefit.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Energy

Contact: Tona Kunz
tkunz@anl.gov
630-252-5560
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Science
Home is where the microbes are
A study published today in Science reports provides a detailed analysis of the microbes that live in houses and apartments. The study was conducted by researchers from the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Chicago.
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, National Institutes of Health, US Environmental Protection Agency, National Science Foundation

Contact: Brian Grabowski
bgrabowski@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Breakthrough antibacterial approach could resolve serious skin infections
In several cases, scientists found an ionic liquid was more efficacious on a pathogenic biofilm than a standard bleach treatment and exhibited minimal cytotoxicity effects on human cell lines (unlike bleach). This has excellent prospects for aiding antibiotic delivery to the pathogen through biofilm disruption.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Science
Unprecedented detail of intact neuronal receptor offers blueprint for drug developers
Scientists succeeded in obtaining an unprecedented view of a type of brain-cell receptor that is implicated in a range of neurological illnesses, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, depression, schizophrenia, autism, and ischemic injuries associated with stroke.
US Department of Energy, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Tona Kunz
tkunz@anl.gov
630-252-5560
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Jul-2014
Biophysical Journal
ORNL, UTGSM study compares structures of Huntington's disease protein
Neutron scattering research has revealed clear structural differences in the normal and pathological forms of a protein involved in Huntington's disease.

Contact: Morgan McCorkle
mccorkleml@ornl.gov
86-557-407-308
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Jul-2014
ORNL wins eight R&D 100s
Researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have received eight R&D 100 awards, presented by R&D Magazine in recognition of the year's top technological innovations.

Contact: Chris Samoray
samoraycr@ornl.gov
865-241-0709
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Jul-2014
DARPA selects Lawrence Livermore to develop world's first neural device to restore memory
The Department of Defense's Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) awarded Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory up to $2.5 million to develop an implantable neural device with the ability to record and stimulate neurons within the brain to help restore memory, DARPA officials announced this week.
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

Contact: Ken Ma
ma28@llnl.gov
925-423-7602
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Jul-2014
Science
New discovery in living cell signaling
A breakthrough discovery into how living cells process and respond to chemical information could help advance the development of treatments for a large number of cancers and other cellular disorders that have been resistant to therapy.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Jun-2014
Nature Communications
Scientists use X-rays to look at how DNA protects itself from UV light
The molecular building blocks that make up DNA absorb ultraviolet light so strongly that sunlight should deactivate them -- yet it does not. Now scientists have made detailed observations of a 'relaxation response' that protects these molecules, and the genetic information they encode, from UV damage.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.standford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Jun-2014
Moly 99 reactor using Sandia design could lead to US supply of isotope to track disease
An Albuquerque startup company has licensed a Sandia National Laboratories technology that offers a way to make molybdenum-99, a key radioactive isotope needed for diagnostic imaging in nuclear medicine, in the United States.

Contact: Nancy Salem
mnsalem@sandia.gov
505-844-2739
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 11-Jun-2014
Lawrence Livermore Lab awarded $5.6 million to develop next-generation neural devices
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory recently received $5.6 million from the Department of Defense's Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency to develop an implantable neural interface with the ability to record and stimulate neurons within the brain for treating neuropsychiatric disorders.
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

Contact: Ken Ma
ma28@llnl.gov
925-423-7602
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Jun-2014
Journal of American Chemical Society
DNA-linked nanoparticles form switchable 'thin films' on a liquid surface
Scientists have used DNA-linked nanoparticles to form a single-particle-thick layer on a liquid surface where the properties of the layer can be easily switched. Understanding the assembly of such nanostructured thin films provides a possible pathway to adjustable filters, surfaces with variable mechanical response, or even new ways to deliver genes for biomedical applications.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Jun-2014
Nature Communications
Berkeley Lab researchers create nanoparticle thin films that self-assemble in 1 minute
Berkeley Lab researchers have devised a technique whereby self-assembling nanoparticle arrays can form a highly ordered thin film over macroscopic distances in one minute.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Jun-2014
Science
Scientists reveal details of calcium 'safety-valve' in cells
The New York Consortium on Membrane Protein Structure used X-rays at Brookhaven Lab's National Synchrotron Light Source to decipher the atomic level structure of a protein that regulates the level of calcium in cells, providing clues about a key signaling agent that can trigger programmed cell death and potentially leading to new anticancer drug targets.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Energy

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 5-Jun-2014
Cell Reports
New clues to why older women are more vulnerable to breast cancer
Berkeley Lab scientists have gained more insights into why older women are more susceptible to breast cancer. They found that as women age, the cells responsible for maintaining healthy breast tissue stop responding to their immediate surroundings, including mechanical cues that should prompt them to suppress nearby tumors.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Jun-2014
Advanced Healthcare Materials
Prototype electrolyte sensor to provide immediate read-outs
A prototype handheld sensor expected to detect and replenish elecrolytes may aid athletes (runners), soldiers on long missions, and ordinary citizens trying to minimize doctor visits and resultant lab charges.
Sandia Laboratory Directed Research and Development, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

Contact: Neal Singer
nsinger@sandia.gov
505-845-7078
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 29-May-2014
Stroke
A tool to better screen and treat aneurysm patients
New research by an international consortium, including a researcher from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, may help physicians better understand the chronological development of a brain aneurysm.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-May-2014
Cell
New details on microtubules and how the anti-cancer drug Taxol works
Berkeley Lab researchers have produced images of microtubule assembly and disassembly at the unprecedented resolution of 5 angstroms, providing new insight into the success of the anti-cancer drug Taxol and pointing the way to possible improvements.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-May-2014
Science
A glimpse into nature's looking glass -- to find the genetic code is reassigned
It has long been assumed that there is only one 'canonical' genetic code, so each word means the same thing to every organism. Now, this paradigm has been challenged by the discovery of large numbers of exceptions from the canonical genetic code, published by a team of researchers from the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute in the May 23, 2014, edition of the journal Science.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Massie Ballon
mlballon@lbl.gov
925-927-2541
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 12-May-2014
Cell
All in the rotation
Berkeley Lab researchers have shed new light on a type of molecular motor used to package the DNA of a number of viruses, including herpes and the adenoviruses. Their findings could help in the development of more effective drugs and inspire the design of new and improved synthetic biomotors.
National Institutes of Health, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Showing releases 1-25 out of 31.

1 | 2 > >>

 

 

Text-Only | Privacy Policy | Site Map