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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 40.

1 | 2 > >>

Public Release: 16-Jun-2016
2016 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging
Innovative device allows 3-D imaging of the breast with less radiation
Adding a new device to an existing breast molecular imaging system allows the system to get six times better contrast of cancer lesions in the breast, providing the same or better image quality while also potentially reducing the radiation dose to the patient by half. The device may also allow for 3-D molecular breast images at higher resolution than current 2-D scans in a format that may be used alongside 3-D digital mammography.
Commonwealth of Virginia's Center for Innovative Technology, Dilon Technologies

Contact: Kandice Carter
kcarter@jlab.org
757-269-7263
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

Public Release: 16-Jun-2016
Journal of Virology
Sandia researchers discover mechanism for Rift Valley fever virus infection
Viruses can't live without us -- literally. As obligate parasites, viruses need a host cell to survive. Scientists are exploiting this characteristic by developing therapeutics that close off pathways necessary for viral infection, essentially stopping pathogens in their tracks. Rift Valley fever virus and other bunyaviruses may soon be added to the list of viruses denied access to a human host. Sandia National Laboratories researchers have discovered a mechanism by which RVFV hijacks the host machinery to cause infection.

Contact: Patti Koning
pkoning@sandia.gov
925-294-4911
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 7-Jun-2016
Journal of Medical Devices
Chemical 'sponges' designed to soak up toxic cancer-fighting drugs after targeting tumors
Researchers are creating materials for a cancer treatment system that can limit the side effects of chemotherapy drugs by quickly removing them from the body after use.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Jun-2016
Nature Chemical Biology
Copper is key in burning fat
A new study led by a Berkeley Lab scientist and UC Berkeley professor establishes for the first time copper's role in fat metabolism, further burnishing the metal's reputation as an essential nutrient for human physiology.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Sarah Yang
scyang@lbl.gov
510-486-4575
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 1-Jun-2016
Bone
Team identifies gene involved with fracture healing
New identification of a gene involved in the fracture healing process could lead to the development of new therapeutic treatments for difficult-to-heal injuries.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 31-May-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
RNA simulations boost understanding of retroviral diseases
New molecular dynamics research into how RNA folds into hairpin-shaped structures called tetraloops could provide important insights into new treatments for retroviral diseases.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 27-May-2016
Nature Microbiology
PNNL helps lead national microbiome initiative
Scientists Janet Jansson and Ljiljana Paša-Toli are part of a core group of scientists leading a national effort to understand communities of microorganisms and their role in climate science, food production and human health.

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 25-May-2016
Radiation 101: DoseNet delivers environmental data as an educational tool
A network of radiation-monitoring devices and a companion website and open-source code serve as educational and outreach tools for an international project called DoseNet that stretches from Northern California classrooms to a city hall in Japan. Its broad aim is to inform and connect students and communities using science and data as common ground.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-May-2016
Angewandte Chemie
Neutrons probe structure of enzyme critical to development of next-generation HIV drugs
A team led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory used neutron analysis to better understand a protein implicated in the replication of HIV, the retrovirus that causes AIDS. The enzyme, known as HIV-1 protease, is a key drug target for HIV and AIDS therapies. The multi-institutional team used neutron crystallography to uncover detailed interactions of hydrogen bonds at the enzyme's active site, revealing a pH-induced proton 'hopping' mechanism that guides its activity.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Jeremy Rumsey
rumseyjp@ornl.gov
865-576-2038
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 19-May-2016
Journal of Orthopaedic Research
New research could personalize medicine for arthritis patients
Recently, a team of scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, University of California, Davis, University of California, Merced and Regeneron Pharmaceuticals examined the whole-joint gene expression by RNA sequencing at one day, one, six and 12 weeks after injury. The team used a new, non-invasive tibial compression mouse model of PTOA, that mimics ACL rupture in humans from a single high-impact injury.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Mar-2016
ACS Nano
ORNL-NIST team explores nanoscale objects and processes with microwave microscopy
Researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the National Institute of Standards and Technology have demonstrated a nondestructive way to observe nanoscale objects and processes in conditions simulating their normal operating environments. Their novel approach combines ultrathin membranes with microwaves and a scanning probe.
Department of Energy Office of Science, National Institute of Standards and Technology

Contact: Dawn Levy
levyd@ornl.gov
865-576-6448
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Mar-2016
Analytical Chemistry
Lighting up disease-carrying mosquitoes
Robert Meagher, a chemical engineer at Sandia National Laboratories, has developed a simple technique for simultaneously detecting RNA from West Nile and chikungunya virus in samples from mosquitoes. He is now working to add the ability to screen for Zika virus.

Contact: Patti Koning
pkoning@sandia.gov
925-294-4911
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 25-Feb-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Analyzing genetic tree sheds new light on disease outbreaks
Scientists have a new tool for unraveling the mysteries of how diseases such as HIV move through a population, thanks to insights into phylogenetics, the creation of an organism's genetic tree and evolutionary relationships.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Feb-2016
Nature Structural & Molecular Biology
Scientists propose 'pumpjack' mechanism for splitting and copying DNA
New close-up images of the proteins that copy DNA inside the nucleus of a cell have led a team of scientists to propose a brand new mechanism for how this molecular machinery works. The scientists studied proteins from yeast cells, which share many features with the cells of complex organisms such as humans, and could offer new insight into ways that DNA replication can go awry.
National Institutes of Health, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Brookhaven Lab Biology Department

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Feb-2016
Journal of American Chemical Society
Scientists take key step toward custom-made nanoscale chemical factories
Scientists have for the first time reengineered a building block of a geometric nanocompartment that occurs naturally in bacteria to give it a new function.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Jan-2016
PNNL moves cybersecurity software and a novel disinfecting system beyond the lab
Software that helps cybersecurity analysts prevent hacks and a microbial disinfecting system that kills with an activated salt spray are two of the latest innovations Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has successfully commercialized with the help of business partners. The Federal Laboratory Consortium has honored the two teams with 2016 Excellence in Technology Transfer awards.
Department of Energy

Contact: Eric Francavilla
eric.francavilla@pnnl.gov
509-372-4066
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Jan-2016
2015 GPU Technology Conference
Titan targets tumors
Researchers at the German research laboratory Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden Rossendorf are using Titan to understand and control new methods for particle acceleration that could have big impacts on laser-driven tumor removal.
Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, US Department of Energy

Contact: Eric Gedenk
gedenked@ornl.gov
865-241-5497
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Jan-2016
ORNL, SCIEX sign license agreement for analytical chemistry tech
The Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and SCIEX of Framingham, Mass., have signed a licensing agreement for technologies that speed up, simplify and expand the use of analytic chemistry equipment.

Contact: Morgan McCorkle
mccorkleml@ornl.gov
865-574-7308
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Dec-2015
Small
ORNL cell-free protein synthesis is potential lifesaver
Lives of soldiers and others injured in remote locations could be saved with a cell-free protein synthesis system developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Dec-2015
Nature Communications
Diamonds may be the key to future NMR/MRI technologies
Berkeley Lab researchers have demonstrated that diamonds may hold the key to the future for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technologies. NMR/MRI signals were significantly strengthened through the hyperpolarization of carbon-13 nuclei in diamond using microwaves.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Dec-2015
Journal of Breast Cancer Research and Treatment
New weapon in the fight against breast cancer
Berkeley Lab researchers have developed the first clinically-relevant mouse model of human breast cancer to successfully express functional estrogen receptor positive adenocarcinomas. This model should be a powerful tool for testing therapies for aggressive ER+ breast cancers and for studying luminal cancers -- the most prevalent and deadliest forms of breast cancer.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Dec-2015
Portable MRI named Top 10 Breakthrough of 2015 by Physics World magazine
Los Alamos National Laboratory's portable MRI was named one of the Top 10 Breakthroughs of the Year by Physics World, the member magazine of the Institute of Physics. Portable MRI, also called Battlefield MRI (bMRI), uses ultra-low-field magnetic resonance imaging to create images of injured soft tissues, such as the brain.

Contact: Luara Mullane
mullane@lanl.gov
505-667-6012
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 7-Dec-2015
A cure for medical researchers' big data headache
Oak Ridge Graph Analytics for Medical Innovation (ORiGAMI), supplies researchers with an advanced data tool for literature-based discovery that has the potential to accelerate medical research and discovery. The result of collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the US National Library of Medicine, ORiGAMI unites three emerging technologies that are shaping the future of health care: big data, graph computing, and the Semantic Web.

Contact: Jonathan Hines
hinesjd@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 7-Dec-2015
Scientific Reports
New clues for battling botulism
Scientists have discovered new details about how 'cloaking' proteins protect the toxin that causes botulism, a fatal disease caused most commonly by consuming improperly canned foods. That knowledge and the cloaking proteins themselves might now be turned against the toxin -- the deadliest known to humankind.
Defense Threat Reduction Agency, National Institutes of Health, DOE Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Dec-2015
Livermore Lab researchers use 3-D printing to build human physiology outside the body
The cardiovascular system is a complex web of tens of thousands of miles of arteries, capillaries and veins, branching throughout the body like tributaries of a great river. And now, researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are recapitulating this intricate network using an emerging technology: 3-D bioprinting.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Showing releases 1-25 out of 40.

1 | 2 > >>

 

 

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