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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 50.

1 | 2 > >>

Public Release: 18-Dec-2014
Nature Chemistry
Stunning zinc fireworks when egg meets sperm
Zinc flux plays a central role in regulating the biochemical processes that ensure a healthy egg-to-embryo transition, and this new unprecedented quantitative information should be useful in improving in vitro fertilization methods.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Energy

Contact: Tona Kunz
tkunz@anl.gov
630-252-5560
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Dec-2014
2014 AGU Fall Meeting
PNNL talks climate, carbon, drinking water and the nexus of health and environment at AGU
Scientists from the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory will present a variety of research at the 2014 American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, which runs Monday, Dec. 15 through Friday, Dec. 19, at the Moscone Convention Center in San Francisco.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Susan Bauer
susan.bauer@pnnl.gov
509-372-6083
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
Nature Communications
Turning biological cells to stone improves cancer and stem cell research
A simple technique that creates near-perfect, robust models of human and animal cells is being used to study cancer and stem cells, and could be used to create complex durable structures without the use of machinery.
US Department of Energy's Basic Energy Sciences

Contact: Neal Singer
nsinger@sandia.gov
505-845-7078
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Copper on the brain at rest
A new study by Berkeley Lab researchers has shown that proper copper levels are essential to the health of the brain at rest.
National Institutes of Health and Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Nov-2014
Environmental Science & Technology
Thirdhand smoke: Toxic airborne pollutants linger long after the smoke clears
Scientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have published a new study assessing the health effects of thirdhand smoke constituents present in indoor air. Looking at levels of more than 50 volatile organic compounds and airborne particles for 18 hours after smoking had taken place, they found that thirdhand smoke continues to have harmful health impacts for many hours after a cigarette has been extinguished.
University of California's Tobacco-Related Disease Research Program

Contact: Julie Chao
JHChao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 31-Oct-2014
168th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America
Are my muscular dystrophy drugs working?
People with muscular dystrophy could one day assess the effectiveness of their medication with the help of a smartphone-linked device, a new study in mice suggests. The study used a new method to process ultrasound imaging information that could lead to hand-held instruments that provide fast, convenient medical information.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
ORNL's Urban Dynamics Institute joins global fight against polio
The new Urban Dynamics Institute at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is working with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to aid polio vaccination efforts in developing countries.
Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Contact: Chris Samoray
samoraycr@ornl.gov
865-241-0709
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Genes and Development
Key moment mapped in assembly of DNA-splitting molecular machine
Scientists reveal crucial steps and surprising structures in the genesis of the enzyme that divides the DNA double helix during cell replication.
National Institutes of Health, United Kingdom Medical Research Council

Contact: Justin Eure
jeure@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 7-Oct-2014
Bio researchers receive patent to fight superbugs
Superbugs, antibiotic-resistant bacteria, have been on the rise since antibiotics were first introduced 80 years ago. That's because these germ-fighting agents have lost their punch from being overprescribed and misused, allowing bacteria pathogens to develop immunities against them.

Contact: Ken Ma
ma28@llnl.gov
925-423-7602
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Sep-2014
New NIH/DOE grant for life science studies at NSLS-II
A new grant just awarded by the National Institutes of Health and the US Department of Energy will fund the operation of a suite of powerful experimental tools for Life Sciences research at DOE's Brookhaven National Laboratory.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, US Department of Energy

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Science
Collaboration drives achievement in protein structure research
When this week's print issue of the journal Science comes out, a collective cheer will go up from New Mexico, Montana and even the Netherlands, thanks to the type of collaborative effort that is more and more the norm in these connected times.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Nature
X-rays unlock a protein's SWEET side
Understanding just how sugar makes its way into the cell could lead to the design of better drugs for diabetes patients and an increase in the amount of fruits and vegetables farmers are able to grow. Stanford University researchers have recently uncovered one of these 'pathways' into the cell by piecing together proteins slightly wider than the diameter of a strand of spider silk.
US Department of Energy, National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: Tona Kunz
tkunz@anl.gov
630-252-5560
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
eLife
Decoding virus-host interactions in the oxygen-starved ocean
In certain coastal areas, severe reductions in oxygen levels in the water destroy food web structure. Over the past 50 years, such oxygen minimum zones have expanded due to climate change and increased waste run-off. Reported in the journal eLife, a collaboration between researchers from the Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute, the University of British Columbia, and University of Arizona studied how viral infection influences a microbial community in one such OMZ.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 3-Sep-2014
Story from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Sept. 2014
1) Precision projectile tracker. 2) Microscopic needles to imprint the patient's corneal tissue. 3) Connecting vehicles could save nearly 3 billion gallons of fuel. 4) Tiny Titan can help middle and high school students explore the fundamental concepts of parallel computing.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Cell Host & Microbe
Study reveals how Ebola blocks immune system
Researchers have identified one way the Ebola virus dodges the body's antiviral defenses, providing important insight that could lead to new therapies.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Brian Grabowski
media@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Bone
Revealing a novel mode of action for an osteoporosis drug
Raloxifene is a US Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment for decreasing fracture risk in osteoporosis. While raloxifene is as effective at reducing fracture risk as other current treatments, this works only partially by suppressing bone loss. X-ray studies revealed an additional mechanism underlying raloxifene action, providing an explanation for how this drug can achieve equivalent clinical benefit.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Energy

Contact: Tona Kunz
tkunz@anl.gov
630-252-5560
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Science
Home is where the microbes are
A study published today in Science reports provides a detailed analysis of the microbes that live in houses and apartments. The study was conducted by researchers from the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Chicago.
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, National Institutes of Health, US Environmental Protection Agency, National Science Foundation

Contact: Brian Grabowski
bgrabowski@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Breakthrough antibacterial approach could resolve serious skin infections
In several cases, scientists found an ionic liquid was more efficacious on a pathogenic biofilm than a standard bleach treatment and exhibited minimal cytotoxicity effects on human cell lines (unlike bleach). This has excellent prospects for aiding antibiotic delivery to the pathogen through biofilm disruption.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Science
Unprecedented detail of intact neuronal receptor offers blueprint for drug developers
Scientists succeeded in obtaining an unprecedented view of a type of brain-cell receptor that is implicated in a range of neurological illnesses, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, depression, schizophrenia, autism, and ischemic injuries associated with stroke.
US Department of Energy, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Tona Kunz
tkunz@anl.gov
630-252-5560
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Jul-2014
Biophysical Journal
ORNL, UTGSM study compares structures of Huntington's disease protein
Neutron scattering research has revealed clear structural differences in the normal and pathological forms of a protein involved in Huntington's disease.

Contact: Morgan McCorkle
mccorkleml@ornl.gov
86-557-407-308
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Jul-2014
ORNL wins eight R&D 100s
Researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have received eight R&D 100 awards, presented by R&D Magazine in recognition of the year's top technological innovations.

Contact: Chris Samoray
samoraycr@ornl.gov
865-241-0709
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Jul-2014
DARPA selects Lawrence Livermore to develop world's first neural device to restore memory
The Department of Defense's Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) awarded Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory up to $2.5 million to develop an implantable neural device with the ability to record and stimulate neurons within the brain to help restore memory, DARPA officials announced this week.
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

Contact: Ken Ma
ma28@llnl.gov
925-423-7602
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Jul-2014
Science
New discovery in living cell signaling
A breakthrough discovery into how living cells process and respond to chemical information could help advance the development of treatments for a large number of cancers and other cellular disorders that have been resistant to therapy.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Jun-2014
Nature Communications
Scientists use X-rays to look at how DNA protects itself from UV light
The molecular building blocks that make up DNA absorb ultraviolet light so strongly that sunlight should deactivate them -- yet it does not. Now scientists have made detailed observations of a 'relaxation response' that protects these molecules, and the genetic information they encode, from UV damage.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.standford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Jun-2014
Moly 99 reactor using Sandia design could lead to US supply of isotope to track disease
An Albuquerque startup company has licensed a Sandia National Laboratories technology that offers a way to make molybdenum-99, a key radioactive isotope needed for diagnostic imaging in nuclear medicine, in the United States.

Contact: Nancy Salem
mnsalem@sandia.gov
505-844-2739
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Showing releases 1-25 out of 50.

1 | 2 > >>

 

 

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