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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 26-50 out of 52.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 > >>

Public Release: 11-Jun-2014
Lawrence Livermore Lab awarded $5.6 million to develop next-generation neural devices
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory recently received $5.6 million from the Department of Defense's Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency to develop an implantable neural interface with the ability to record and stimulate neurons within the brain for treating neuropsychiatric disorders.
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

Contact: Ken Ma
ma28@llnl.gov
925-423-7602
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Jun-2014
Journal of American Chemical Society
DNA-linked nanoparticles form switchable 'thin films' on a liquid surface
Scientists have used DNA-linked nanoparticles to form a single-particle-thick layer on a liquid surface where the properties of the layer can be easily switched. Understanding the assembly of such nanostructured thin films provides a possible pathway to adjustable filters, surfaces with variable mechanical response, or even new ways to deliver genes for biomedical applications.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Jun-2014
Nature Communications
Berkeley Lab researchers create nanoparticle thin films that self-assemble in 1 minute
Berkeley Lab researchers have devised a technique whereby self-assembling nanoparticle arrays can form a highly ordered thin film over macroscopic distances in one minute.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Jun-2014
Science
Scientists reveal details of calcium 'safety-valve' in cells
The New York Consortium on Membrane Protein Structure used X-rays at Brookhaven Lab's National Synchrotron Light Source to decipher the atomic level structure of a protein that regulates the level of calcium in cells, providing clues about a key signaling agent that can trigger programmed cell death and potentially leading to new anticancer drug targets.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Energy

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 5-Jun-2014
Cell Reports
New clues to why older women are more vulnerable to breast cancer
Berkeley Lab scientists have gained more insights into why older women are more susceptible to breast cancer. They found that as women age, the cells responsible for maintaining healthy breast tissue stop responding to their immediate surroundings, including mechanical cues that should prompt them to suppress nearby tumors.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Jun-2014
Advanced Healthcare Materials
Prototype electrolyte sensor to provide immediate read-outs
A prototype handheld sensor expected to detect and replenish elecrolytes may aid athletes (runners), soldiers on long missions, and ordinary citizens trying to minimize doctor visits and resultant lab charges.
Sandia Laboratory Directed Research and Development, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

Contact: Neal Singer
nsinger@sandia.gov
505-845-7078
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 29-May-2014
Stroke
A tool to better screen and treat aneurysm patients
New research by an international consortium, including a researcher from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, may help physicians better understand the chronological development of a brain aneurysm.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-May-2014
Cell
New details on microtubules and how the anti-cancer drug Taxol works
Berkeley Lab researchers have produced images of microtubule assembly and disassembly at the unprecedented resolution of 5 angstroms, providing new insight into the success of the anti-cancer drug Taxol and pointing the way to possible improvements.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-May-2014
Science
A glimpse into nature's looking glass -- to find the genetic code is reassigned
It has long been assumed that there is only one 'canonical' genetic code, so each word means the same thing to every organism. Now, this paradigm has been challenged by the discovery of large numbers of exceptions from the canonical genetic code, published by a team of researchers from the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute in the May 23, 2014, edition of the journal Science.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Massie Ballon
mlballon@lbl.gov
925-927-2541
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 12-May-2014
Cell
All in the rotation
Berkeley Lab researchers have shed new light on a type of molecular motor used to package the DNA of a number of viruses, including herpes and the adenoviruses. Their findings could help in the development of more effective drugs and inspire the design of new and improved synthetic biomotors.
National Institutes of Health, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
How a plant beckons the bacteria that will do it harm
A common plant puts out a welcome mat to bacteria seeking to invade, and scientists have discovered the mat's molecular mix. The team showed that the humble and oft-studied plant Arabidopsis puts out a molecular signal that invites an attack from a pathogen. The study reveals new targets during the battle between microbe, which often infects tomatoes, and host that researchers can exploit to protect plants.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Nano Letters
First size-based chromatography technique for the study of living cells
Using nanodot technology, Berkeley Lab researchers demonstrated the first size-based form of chromatography for studying the membranes of living cells. This unique physical approach to probing cellular membrane structures reveals critical information that can't be obtained through conventional microscopy.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Pocket-sized anthrax detector aids global agriculture
A credit-card-sized anthrax detection cartridge developed at Sandia National Laboratories and recently licensed to a small business makes testing safer, easier, faster and cheaper.

Contact: Stephanie Holinka
slholin@sandia.gov
505-284-9227
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Journal of Environmental Quality
Significant baseline levels of arsenic found in Ohio soils are due to natural processes
Geologic and soil processes are to blame for significant baseline levels of arsenic in soil throughout Ohio, according to a new study. The findings pose a challenge for regulators, who must determine what levels should trigger action when natural arsenic levels everywhere are above suggested screening standards.
Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geological Survey, US Geological Survey

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Mar-2014
Society of Toxicology Annual Meeting
ATHENA desktop human 'body' could reduce need for animal drug tests
Creating surrogate human organs, coupled with insights from highly sensitive mass spectrometry technologies, a new project is on the brink of revolutionizing the way we screen new drugs and toxic agents. ATHENA, the Advanced Tissue-engineered Human Ectypal Network Analyzer project team, is developing four human organ constructs -- liver, heart, lung and kidney -- that are based on a significantly miniaturized platform.
Defense Threat Reduction Agency

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Mar-2014
Entrepreneur teams with scientists to bring vaccines to far reaches of the world
With technical help from Sandia National Laboratories through the New Mexico Small Business Assistance Program, a Santa Fe entrepreneur has developed a solar thermal icemaker to cool high-performance shipping containers that safely transport and store temperature-sensitive vaccines and biopharmaceuticals. Thousands of the systems are now being used throughout the world.

Contact: Nancy Salem
505-844-2739
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 16-Mar-2014
Nature
Vast gene-expression map yields neurological and environmental stress insights
A consortium led by Berkeley Lab scientists has conducted the largest survey yet of how information encoded in an animal genome is processed in different organs, stages of development, and environmental conditions. Their findings, based on fruit fly research, paint a new picture of how genes function in the nervous system and in response to environmental stress.
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Mar-2014
Biomaterials
First look at how Staphylococcus cells adhere to nanostructures could help fight infections
A team of researchers led by Berkeley Lab scientists have explored, for the first time, how individual Staphylococcus cells glom onto metallic nanostructures of various shapes and sizes that are not much bigger than the cells themselves. Their work could lead to a more nuanced understanding of what makes a surface less inviting to bacteria.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Mar-2014
Laminar-flow cleanroom inventor honored posthumously by National Inventors Hall of Fame
The inventor of the modern cleanroom, Willis Whitfield, will be honored posthumously by the National Inventors Hall of Fame for a technology that revolutionized manufacturing in electronics and pharmaceuticals, made hospital operating rooms safer and advanced space exploration.

Contact: Heather Clark
hclark@sandia.gov
505-844-3511
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 26-Feb-2014
Journal of Synchrotron Radiation
Nanoscale freezing leads to better imaging
New X-ray tool allows for more sensitivity to trace metals, such as those that cause cancer, in whole cells and tissues.
National Institutes of Health, Department of Energy

Contact: Tona Kunz
tkunz@anl.gov
630-252-5560
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Feb-2014
Journal of American Chemical Society
Tracking catalytic reactions in microreactors
Berkeley Lab researchers have demonstrated a technique that for the first time allows the catalytic reactivity inside a microreactor to be mapped in high resolution from start to finish. This technique opens a more effective and efficient synthesis of pharmaceutical drugs and other flow reactor chemical products.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
Department of Energy speakers and sessions at AAAS
Attendees of the 2014 AAAS Annual Meeting are invited to the events at which representatives from DOE's Office of Science and its labs will play an active part.

Contact: Rick Borchelt
rick.borchelt@science.doe.gov
DOE/US Department of Energy

Public Release: 11-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
Targeting tumors: Ion beam accelerators take aim at cancer
Hear the latest in the development of particle accelerators for delivering cancer-killing beams from a physicist, a radiobiologist, and a clinical oncologist, and participate in a discussion about cost, access, and ethics.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Jan-2014
International Journal of Cancer
Berkeley Lab research finds running may be better than walking for breast cancer survival
Previous studies have shown that breast cancer survivors who meet the current exercise recommendations (2.5 hours of moderate intensity physical activity per week) are at 25 percent lower risk for dying from breast cancer. New research from Berkeley Lab, and reported in the International Journal of Cancer, suggests that exceeding the recommendations may provide greater protection, and that running may be better than walking.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jon Weiner
jrweiner@lbl.gov
510-486-4014
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Jan-2014
Energy and Building
White, green or black roofs? Berkeley Lab report compares economic payoffs
Looking strictly at the economic costs and benefits of three different roof types -- black, white and "green" (or vegetated) -- Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory researchers have found in a new study that white roofs are the most cost-effective over a 50-year time span. While the high installation cost of green roofs sets them back in economic terms, their environmental and amenity benefits may at least partially mitigate their financial burden.

Contact: Julie Chao
jhchao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Showing releases 26-50 out of 52.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 > >>

 

 

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