U.S.Department of Energy Research News
Text-Only | Privacy Policy | Site Map  
Search Releases and Features  
Biological SciencesComputational SciencesEnergy SciencesEnvironmental SciencesPhysical SciencesEngineering and TechnologyNational Security Science

Home
Labs
Multimedia Resources
News Releases
Feature Stories
Library
Contacts
RSS Feed



US Department of Energy National Science Bowl


Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 352.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Public Release: 27-Apr-2016
Scientific Reports
3-D printed foam outperforms traditional cellular materials in long-term stress
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory material scientists have found that 3-D printed foam works better than standard cellular materials in terms of durability and long-term mechanical performance.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Apr-2016
Nature Chemistry
NREL finds nanotube semiconductors well-suited for PV systems
Researchers at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) discovered single-walled carbon nanotube semiconductors could be favorable for photovoltaic systems because they can potentially convert sunlight to electricity or fuels without losing much energy.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Apr-2016
Science Advances
NREL theory establishes a path to high-performance 2-D semiconductor devices
Researchers at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have uncovered a way to overcome a principal obstacle in using two-dimensional (2-D) semiconductors in electronic and optoelectronic devices.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Apr-2016
Science
NREL demonstrates light-driven process for enzymatic ammonia production
A new process using light to reduce dinitrogen into ammonia, the main ingredient in chemical fertilizers could inspire development of new, more sustainable processes that eliminate the energy-intensive, lengthier processes now commonly in use.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Apr-2016
Seeing atoms and molecules in action with an electron 'eye'
A unique rapid-fire electron source -- originally built as a prototype for driving next-generation X-ray lasers -- will help scientists at Berkeley Lab study ultrafast chemical processes and changes in materials at the atomic scale. Berkeley Lab is a member of the LCLS-II project collaboration.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Apr-2016
Physical Review Letters
ORNL researchers discover new state of water molecule
Neutron scattering and computational modeling have revealed unique and unexpected behavior of water molecules under extreme confinement that is unmatched by any known gas, liquid or solid states.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Apr-2016
Nature Communications
Cleaning up hybrid battery electrodes improves capacity and lifespan
Hybrid batteries that charge faster than conventional ones could have significantly better electrical capacity and long-term stability when prepared with a gentle-sounding way of making electrodes. Called ion soft-landing, the high-precision technique resulted in electrodes that could store a third more energy and had twice the lifespan compared to those prepared by a conventional method, the researchers report in Nature Communications.
Department of Energy

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Apr-2016
Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research
Advances in extracting uranium from seawater announced in special issue
The oceans hold more than four billion tons of uranium--enough to meet global energy needs for the next 10,000 years if only we could capture the element from seawater to fuel nuclear power plants. Major advances in this area have been published by the American Chemical Society's journal Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research. Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory led more than half of the 30 papers in the special issue.
DOE/Office of Nuclear Energy

Contact: Dawn Levy
levyd@ornl.gov
865-576-6448
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory, DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Apr-2016
Physical Review D
Numerical simulations shed new light on early universe
Innovative multidisciplinary research in nuclear and particle physics and cosmology has led to the development of a new, more accurate computer code to study the early universe. The code simulates conditions during the first few minutes of cosmological evolution to model the role of neutrinos, nuclei and other particles in shaping the early universe.
National Science Foundation at University of California San Diego, Laboratory Directed Research and Development program through the Center for Space and Earth Sciences

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Apr-2016
Physical Review D
Numerical simulations shed new light on early universe
Innovative multidisciplinary research in nuclear and particle physics and cosmology has led to the development of a new, more accurate computer code to study the early universe.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 19-Apr-2016
Americans use less energy in 2015 according to Lawrence Livermore analysis
Americans used less energy overall in 2015 than the previous year, according to the most recent energy flow charts released by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 19-Apr-2016
Chemistry consortium uses Titan supercomputer to understand actinides
A multi-institution team led by the University of Alabama's David Dixon is using Titan to understand actinide chemistry at the molecular level in hopes of designing methods to clean up contamination and safely store spent nuclear fuel.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Eric Gedenk
gedenked@ornl.gov
865-241-5497
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Apr-2016
Physical Review Letters
What screens are made of: New twists (and bends) in LCD research
A research team has directly measured a spiral molecular arrangement formed by liquid crystals that could help unravel its mysteries and possibly improve the performance of electronic displays.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Apr-2016
Nature Energy
Unexpected discovery leads to a better battery
An unexpected discovery has led to a zinc-manganese oxide rechargeable battery that's as inexpensive as conventional car batteries, but has a much higher energy density.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Franny White
franny.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Apr-2016
Ames Laboratory scientist inducted into National Academy of Inventors
US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory senior metallurgist Iver Anderson was inducted into the National Academy of Inventors at a special ceremony in Washington, D.C., today at the United States Patent and Trademark Office.

Contact: Laura Millsaps
millsaps@ameslab.gov
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Apr-2016
Nuclear Fusion
Princeton graduate student creates program that helps stabilize fusion plasma
Description of a new method for controlling plasma rotation.
US Department of Energy

Contact: John Greenwald
jgreenwa@pppl.gov
609-243-2672
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Apr-2016
Science Advances
'Odd couple' monolayer semiconductors align to advance optoelectronics
In a study led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, scientists synthesized a stack of atomically thin monolayers of two lattice-mismatched semiconductors. Where the two semiconductor layers met, they formed an atomically sharp heterostructure, which generated a photovoltaic response by separating electron-hole pairs that were generated by light. The achievement of creating this atomically thin solar cell shows the promise of synthesizing mismatched layers to enable new families of functional two-dimensional materials.
US Department of Energy, DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Contact: Dawn Levy
levyd@ornl.gov
865-576-6448
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Apr-2016
Science.gov's new interagency microsites for STEM education & training opportunities
Two new federal interagency websites designed to connect undergraduate and graduate students with education and training opportunities in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields have been launched on Science.gov, the portal to US government science information.

Contact: Cathey Daniels
danielsc@osti.gov
865-576-9539
DOE/US Department of Energy

Public Release: 13-Apr-2016
Nature
Elusive state of superconducting matter discovered after 50 years
Scientists at the US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory, Cornell University, and collaborators have produced the first direct evidence of a state of electronic matter first predicted by theorists in 1964 -- a 'Cooper pair density wave.' The discovery, described in a paper published online April 13, 2016, in Nature, may provide key insights into the workings of high-temperature superconductors.
Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Apr-2016
Nature Physics
Ames Laboratory physicists discover new material that may speed computing
Physicists at the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory have discovered a topological metal, PtSn4 (platinum and tin), with a unique electronic structure that may someday lead to energy efficient computers with increased processor speeds and data storage.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Laura Millsaps
millsaps@ameslab.gov
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Apr-2016
ACS Nano
Quantum dots enhance light-to-current conversion in layered semiconductors
Scientists combined the excellent light-harvesting properties of quantum dots with the tunable electrical conductivity of a layered tin disulfide semiconductor to produce a hybrid material that exhibited enhanced light-harvesting and energy transfer properties. The research paves the way for using these materials in optoelectronic applications such as energy-harvesting photovoltaics, light sensors, and light emitting diodes (LEDs).
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 7-Apr-2016
Nature Materials
ORNL neutron 'splashes' reveal signature of exotic particles
Researchers used neutrons to uncover novel behavior in materials that holds promise for quantum computing. The findings provide evidence for long-sought phenomena in a two-dimensional magnet.

Contact: Katie Bethea
betheakl@ornl.gov
865-576-8039
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Apr-2016
Angewandte Chemie International Edition
Plastic proteins: Synthetic material mimics essential characteristics of natural proteins
PNNL researchers hoping to design new materials for energy uses have developed a system to make synthetic polymers -- some would say plastics -- with the versatility of nature's own polymers, the ubiquitous proteins. Based on an inexpensive industrial chemical, these synthetic polymers might one day be used to create materials with functions as limitless as proteins, which are involved in every facet of life.
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Apr-2016
Journal of the American Chemical Society
ORNL tracks how halogen atoms compete to grow 'winning' perovskites
Researchers have found a potential path to further improve solar cell efficiency by understanding the competition among halogen atoms during the synthesis of sunlight-absorbing crystals.

Contact: Bill Cabage
cabagewh@ornl.gov
865-574-4399
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Apr-2016
Nuclear Fusion
PPPL scientists help test innovative device to improve efficiency of tokamaks
This article describes a successful test of liquid lithium limiter on China's EAST tokamak.
National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China, National Nature Science Foundation of China, Foresight Program, US Department of Energy

Contact: John Greenwald
jgreenwa@pppl.gov
609-243-2672
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Showing releases 1-25 out of 352.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

 

 

Text-Only | Privacy Policy | Site Map