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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 126-150 out of 330.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 > >>

Public Release: 26-Oct-2015
Nature Physics
Unraveling the complex, intertwined electron phases in a superconductor
A team led by researchers from Brookhaven Lab and Cornell has characterized a key arrangement of electrons that may impede superconductivity in cuprates. Understanding this 'electron density wave' may lead to ways to suppress or remove it to induce superconductivity, possibly even at room temperature.
DOE Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Oct-2015
Nature Photonics
Exciting breakthrough in 2-D lasers
An important step towards next-generation ultra-compact photonic and optoelectronic devices has been taken with the realization of a two-dimensional excitonic laser. Berkeley Lab researchers have embedded a monolayer of tungsten disulfide into a special microdisk resonator to achieve bright excitonic lasing at visible light wavelengths.
US Air Force Office of Scientific Research, DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Oct-2015
Physical Review Letters
Scientists gain insight into origin of tungsten-ditelluride's magnetoresistance
Two new significant findings may move scientists closer to understanding the origins of tungsten-ditelluride's (WTe2) extremely large magnetoresistance, a key characteristic in modern electronic devices like magnetic hard drives and sensors. Scientists in Illinois recently discovered that tungsten-ditelluride (WTe2) is electronically three-dimensional with a low anisotropy.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 19-Oct-2015
Scientific Reports
Solvents save steps in solar cell manufacturing
Advances in ultrathin films have made solar panels and semiconductor devices more efficient and less costly, and researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory say they've found a way to manufacture the films more easily, too.
Basic Energy Sciences

Contact: Jeremy Rumsey
rumseyjp@ornl.gov
865-576-2038
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 19-Oct-2015
Nature Physics
'Molecular accordion' drives thermoelectric behavior in promising material
Engines, laptops and power plants generate waste heat. Thermoelectric materials, which convert temperature gradients to electricity and vice versa, can recover some of that heat and improve energy efficiency. A team of scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory explored the fundamental physics of the world's best thermoelectric material -- tin selenide -- using neutron scattering and computer simulations. Their work may aid energy sustainability and design of materials that convert heat into electricity.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Dawn Levy
levyd@ornl.gov
865-576-6448
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Oct-2015
Nature Communications
Is black phosphorus the next big thing in materials?
Berkeley Lab researchers have confirmed that single-crystal black phosphorus nanoribbons display a strong in-plane anisotropy in thermal conductivity, an experimental revelation that should facilitate the future application of this highly promising material to electronic, optoelectronic and thermoelectric devices.
US Department of Energy's Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Oct-2015
Nuclear Science Advisory Committee issues plan for US nuclear physics research
The Nuclear Science Advisory Committee, or NSAC, has publicly released 'Reaching for the Horizon, The 2015 Long Range Plan for Nuclear Science.' The new plan was unanimously accepted by NSAC, a committee composed of eminent scientists who have been tasked by DOE and the National Science Foundation to provide recommendations on future research in the field.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Kandice Carter
kcarter@jlab.org
757-269-7263
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

Public Release: 14-Oct-2015
SC15
Nanoelectronics researchers employ Titan for an electrifying simulation speedup
A team led by ETH Zurich's Mathieu Luisier used the Titan supercomputer to improve size and speed of nanoelectronics models.
US Department of Energy, ETH Zurich, CSCS

Contact: Eric Gedenk
gedenked@ornl.gov
865-241-5497
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Oct-2015
It's solid: Storing hydrogen in a new form
As part of a tri-lab consortium, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researchers will develop tools and understanding necessary for designing new solid-state materials for storing hydrogen gas.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Oct-2015
Bay Area national labs team to tackle long-standing automotive hydrogen storage challenge
Sandia National Laboratories will lead a new tri-lab consortium to address unsolved scientific challenges in the development of viable solid-state materials for storage of hydrogen onboard vehicles. Better onboard hydrogen storage could lead to more reliable and economic hydrogen fuel cell vehicles.

Contact: Patti Koning
pkoning@sandia.gov
925-294-4911
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 7-Oct-2015
Nature Communications
Dirt-cheap catalyst may lower fuel costs for hydrogen-powered cars
Bringing closer a mass market for hydrogen-powered cars, Sandia researchers are upgrading $0.37/gram molybdenum disulfide, 'molly' for short, to take the place of $1,500/gram catalyst platinum. Unlike gasoline, hydrogen as fuel releases water, not carbon, into the air.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Neal Singer
nsinger@sandia.gov
505-845-7078
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 6-Oct-2015
JBEI joins 100/500 club
The Joint BioEnergy Institute is now a member of the '100/500 Club,' having filed its 100th patent application and published its 500th scientific paper. JBEI is a DOE Bioenergy Research Center led by Berkeley Lab.

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Oct-2015
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oct. 2015
This tip sheet includes: High octane rating makes ethanol attractive; ORNL has potential solution to congestion, collisions; ORNL using advanced methods to discover new materials; ORNL hosting molten salt reactor workshop; and Virginia Tech using ORNL computing resources for energy exploration

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 5-Oct-2015
Nanoscale
ORNL researchers find 'greener' way to assemble materials for solar applications
The efficiency of solar cells depends on precise engineering of polymers that assemble into films 1,000 times thinner than a human hair. Today, formation of that polymer assembly requires solvents that can harm the environment, but scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have found a 'greener' way to control the assembly of photovoltaic polymers in water using a surfactant -- a detergent-like molecule -- as a template.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Dawn Levy
levyd@ornl.gov
865-576-6448
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 5-Oct-2015
Angewandte Chemie International Edition
Flipping molecular attachments amps up activity of CO2 catalyst
New research by chemists at Brookhaven Lab offers clues that could help scientists design more effective catalysts for transforming carbon dioxide to useful products. The study reveals how a simple rearrangement of molecular attachments on an iridium hydride catalyst can greatly improve its ability to coax notoriously stable CO2 molecules to react.
DOE Office of Science, Japan Science and Technology Agency

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 1-Oct-2015
Quark Matter 2015
Scientists present, discuss latest data from experiments smashing nuclei
Scientists intent on unraveling the mystery of the force that binds the building blocks of visible matter are gathered in Kobe, Japan, this week to present and discuss the latest results from smashups of nuclei at the world's premier particle colliders -- the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and the Large Hadron Collider.
DOE Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 30-Sep-2015
Electric vehicle charging habits revealed
This week, Idaho National Laboratory is reporting analysis results from the largest collection of light-duty plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) and charging infrastructure demonstrations in the world. The key finding was that public charging infrastructure is not needed everywhere to enable PEV adoption.
DOE/Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Charge Point America Project, Chrysler Ram PEV Demonstration, General Motors Volt Demonstration, South Coast Air Quality Management District/Via Motors PHEV Demonstration, and others

Contact: Nicole Stricker
nicole.stricker@inl.gov
208-526-5955
DOE/Idaho National Laboratory

Public Release: 30-Sep-2015
Arizona State University & PNNL sign agreement to develop solutions to global challenges
A new memorandum of understanding between PNNL and Arizona State University formalizes the institutions' research collaboration on topics involving energy security, climate science and sustainability, and other aspects of global security.

Contact: Susan Bauer
susan.bauer@PNNL.gov
509-372-6083
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Sep-2015
Science
A different type of 2-D semiconductor
Berkeley Lab researchers have produced the first atomically thin 2-D sheets of organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites. These ionic materials exhibit optical properties not found in 2-D covalent semiconductors such as graphene, making them promising alternatives to silicon for future electronic devices.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Sep-2015
ChemSusChem
ORNL demonstrates road to supercapacitors for scrap tires
Some of the 300 million tires discarded each year in the United States alone could be used in supercapacitors for vehicles and the electric grid using a technology developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Drexel University.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Sep-2015
Science
The rise of X-ray beam chemistry
By using powerful photon beams generated by the Advanced Photon Source, a DOE User Facility, researchers have shown that they can now control the chemical environment and provide nanoscale structural detail while simultaneously imaging the mineral calcite as it is pushed to its extremes.
Geosciences Research Program of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences

Contact: Justin H. S. Breaux
jbreaux@anl.gov
630-252-5823
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Sep-2015
Physical Review Letters
New theory of stealth dark matter may explain universe's missing mass
Lawrence Livermore scientists have come up with a new theory that may identify why dark matter has evaded direct detection in Earth-based experiments.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Sep-2015
Journal of the American Chemical Society
Los Alamos explores hybrid ultrasmall gold nanocluster for enzymatic fuel cells
With fossil-fuel sources dwindling, better biofuel cell design is a strong candidate in the energy field. In research published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, Los Alamos researchers and external collaborators synthesized and characterized a new DNA-templated gold nanocluster (AuNC) that could resolve a critical methodological barrier for efficient biofuel cell design.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Sep-2015
Vision for NREL technology has entrepreneur seeing clearly
A serial entrepreneur with four companies to his credit, Loren Burnett found the makings of his fifth at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The founder, chairman, and CEO of what is now called e-Chromic Technologies Inc., Burnett was looking for a technology with a potentially huge market, something unique and easily understood that wouldn't take a decade and tens of millions of dollars to turn into a product

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Sep-2015
NREL signs agreement with China's national utility
Representatives of the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory and China's State Grid Energy Research Institute today signed a first-ever memorandum of understanding between the two organizations.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Showing releases 126-150 out of 330.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 > >>

 

 

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