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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 26-50 out of 352.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>

Public Release: 21-Jun-2016
The clean dozen: 12 techs near commercial use
A dozen clean energy technologies that enable everything from lightweight, fuel-sipping cars to the expansion of renewable energy and cleaner fossil fuel use are getting a boost at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, thanks to $4.4 million from the Department of Energy's Technology Commercialization Fund.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Franny White
franny.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Jun-2016
Microwave imaging expert at Sandia Labs honored as SPIE fellow for radar work
Sandia National Laboratories researcher Armin Doerry has been named a SPIE fellow for his technical achievements in imaging microwave radar technology development, design and analysis.

Contact: Heather Clark
hclark@sandia.gov
505-844-3511
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 20-Jun-2016
Advanced Structural and Chemical Imaging
New electron microscope method detects atomic-scale magnetism
Scientists can now detect magnetic behavior at the atomic level with a new electron microscopy technique developed by a team from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Uppsala University, Sweden. The researchers took a counterintuitive approach by taking advantage of optical distortions that they typically try to eliminate.

Contact: Morgan McCorkle
mccorkleml@ornl.gov
865-574-7308
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Jun-2016
Nature Communications
Titan shines light on high-temperature superconductor pathway
A team led by Thomas Maier of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) used the Titan supercomputer at ORNL to simulate cuprates on the path to superconductivity. Maier's team focused on a pivotal juncture on the cuprates' path called the pseudogap phase, an in-between phase before superconductivity in which cuprates exhibit both insulating and conducting properties.

Contact: Jonathan Hines
jdhines1786@gmail.com
865-574-6944
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Jun-2016
Scientists seek new physics using ORNL's intense neutrino source
Soon to be deployed at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory is an experiment to explore new physics associated with neutrinos. The Precision Oscillation and Spectrum Experiment, or PROSPECT, is led by Yale University and includes partners from 14 academic and governmental institutions. The DOE High Energy Physics program will support the experiment at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), a DOE Office of Science User Facility at ORNL.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Dawn Levy
levyd@ornl.gov
865-576-6448
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Jun-2016
Nature Communications
Discovery of gold nanocluster 'double' hints at other shape-changing particles
Researchers discovered an entirely unexpected atomic arrangement of Gold-144, a molecule-sized nanogold cluster whose structure had been theoretically predicted but never confirmed.
Department of Energy Office of Science, National Science Foundation, Villum Foundation, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Colorado State University, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Ariana Tantillo
atantillo@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Jun-2016
2016 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging
Innovative device allows 3-D imaging of the breast with less radiation
Adding a new device to an existing breast molecular imaging system allows the system to get six times better contrast of cancer lesions in the breast, providing the same or better image quality while also potentially reducing the radiation dose to the patient by half. The device may also allow for 3-D molecular breast images at higher resolution than current 2-D scans in a format that may be used alongside 3-D digital mammography.
Commonwealth of Virginia's Center for Innovative Technology, Dilon Technologies

Contact: Kandice Carter
kcarter@jlab.org
757-269-7263
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

Public Release: 15-Jun-2016
Nature Communications
New 3-D printed polymer can convert methane to methanol
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory scientists have combined biology and 3-D printing to create the first reactor that can continuously produce methanol from methane at room temperature and pressure.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Jun-2016
Nature Communications
New X-ray method allows scientists to probe molecular explosions
A team led by researchers from the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory used the high-intensity, quick-burst X-rays provided by the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory to look at how the atoms in a molecule change when the molecule is bombarded with X-rays.

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5274
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
Science
Neutrons reveal unexpected magnetism in rare-earth alloy
Researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and their collaborators used neutron scattering to uncover magnetic excitations in the metallic compound ytterbium-platinum-lead. Surprisingly, this three-dimensional material exhibits magnetic properties that one would conventionally expect if the connectivity between magnetic ions was only one-dimensional. A better understanding of those behaviors could lead to applications in quantum computing and improved storage device technologies.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Jeremy Rumsey
rumseyjp@ornl.gov
865-576-2038
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
Researchers gear up galaxy-seeking robots for a test run
A prototype system that will test a planned array of 5,000 robots for a sky-mapping instrument is taking shape at Berkeley Lab. Dubbed ProtoDESI, the scaled-down, 10-robot system will run through a series of tests on a telescope in Arizona from August-September.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
Nature Communications
Efficient hydrogen production made easy
Understanding how to use a simple, room-temperature treatment to drastically change the properties of materials could lead to a revolution in renewable fuels production and electronic applications.
Los Alamos Directed Research Grant

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
Nature Chemistry
DNA shaping up to be ideal framework for rationally designed nanostructures
Scientists developed two DNA-based self-assembly approaches for desired nanostructures. The first approach allows the same set of nanoparticles to be connected into a variety of three-dimensional structures; the second facilitates the integration of different nanoparticles and DNA frames into interconnecting modules, expanding the diversity of possible structures. These approaches could enable the rational design of nanomaterials with enhanced or combined optical, electric, and magnetic properties to achieve desired functions.
US Department of Energy, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Ariana Tantillo
atantillo@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
Nature Communications
New material has potential to cut costs and make nuclear fuel recycling cleaner
Researchers are investigating a new material that might help in nuclear fuel recycling and waste reduction by capturing certain gases released during reprocessing more efficiently than today's technology. The metal-organic framework captures radioactive gases xenon and krypton at ambient temperature, eliminating an energy-intensive, expensive step.
DOE/Offices of Nuclear Energy and Science

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
Nature Nanotechnology
Weird, water-oozing material could help quench thirst
Nanorods created by PNNL researchers have an unusual property -- spontaneously emitting water. After further development, the nanorods could be used for water harvesting and purification, or sweat-gathering fabric.
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Contact: Franny White
franny.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Jun-2016
Science Advances
New mathematics accurately captures liquids and surfaces moving in synergy
A new mathematical framework developed at Berkeley Lab, published in the June 10, 2016 issue of Science Advances, allows researchers to capture fluid dynamics coupled to interface motion at unprecedented detail. The framework, called 'interfacial gauge methods', developed by Robert Saye, a Luis W. Alvarez Fellow in the Mathematics Group at Berkeley Lab, rewrites the equations governing incompressible fluid flow in a way that is more amenable to accurate computer modeling.
DOE/Office of Science, Berkeley Lab's Laboratory Directed Research Development program

Contact: Linda Vu
lvu@lbl.gov
510-495-2402
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Jun-2016
Energy & Environmental Science
Massive trove of battery and molecule data released to public
The Materials Project, a Google-like database of material properties aimed at accelerating innovation, has released an enormous trove of data to the public, giving scientists working on batteries, fuel cells, photovoltaics, thermoelectrics, and a host of other advanced materials a powerful tool to explore new research avenues.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Julie H Chao
jhchao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Jun-2016
Provisional names announced for superheavy elements 113, 115, 117, and 118
The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry Inorganic Chemistry Division has published a Provisional Recommendation for the names and symbols of the recently discovered superheavy elements 113, 115, 117, and 118.

Contact: Morgan McCorkle
mccorkleml@ornl.gov
865-574-7308
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Jun-2016
Names recommended for elements 115, 117 and 118
The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) opened a public comment period Wednesday for the recommended names of elements 115, 117 and 118.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 7-Jun-2016
Nature Communications
ORNL research finds magnetic material could host wily Weyl fermions
An elusive massless particle could exist in a magnetic crystal structure, revealed by neutron and X-ray research from a team of scientists led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Tennessee.

Contact: Morgan McCorkle
mccorkleml@ornl.gov
865-574-7308
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 7-Jun-2016
Journal of Medical Devices
Chemical 'sponges' designed to soak up toxic cancer-fighting drugs after targeting tumors
Researchers are creating materials for a cancer treatment system that can limit the side effects of chemotherapy drugs by quickly removing them from the body after use.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Jun-2016
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, June 2016
New battery technology a boost for Formula E race cars; New ORNL roof coating helps keep roofs cool; ORNL technique reveals defects in solar cell material; ORNL finding shows promise for alternating current conduction for oxide electronics.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Jun-2016
New alloy promises to boost rare earth production while improving engine efficiency
Researchers have developed aluminum alloys that are both easier to work with and more heat tolerant than existing products.

Contact: Leo Williams
williamsjl2@ornl.gov
865-574-8891
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 2-Jun-2016
Science
Scientists find surprising magnetic excitations in a metallic compound
Scientists have found magnetic excitations in a metallic compound whose main source of magnetism is the orbital movement of its electrons. Their discovery challenges conventional wisdom that these excitations are only found in materials whose magnetism is dominated by the spin of its electrons.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research, Netherlands Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter

Contact: Ariana Tantillo
atantillo@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 1-Jun-2016
Physics Review Letters
Spinning electrons yield positrons for research
A team of researchers has successfully demonstrated a new method for producing a beam of polarized positrons, a method that could enable a wide range of applications and research, such as improved product manufacturing and polarized positron beams to power breakthrough scientific research.
DOE/Office of Science, French Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, International Linear Collider project

Contact: Kandice Carter
kcarter@jlab.org
757-269-7263
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

Showing releases 26-50 out of 352.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>

 

 

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