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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 26-50 out of 142.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>

Public Release: 21-Aug-2014
Science
X-ray laser probes tiny quantum tornadoes in superfluid droplets
An experiment at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory revealed a well-organized 3-D grid of quantum 'tornadoes' inside microscopic droplets of supercooled liquid helium -- the first time this formation has been seen at such a tiny scale. The findings by an international research team provide new insight on the strange nanoscale traits of a so-called 'superfluid' state of liquid helium.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
American Chemical Society 248th National Meeting & Exposition
Journal of American Chemical Society
Water leads to chemical that gunks up biofuels production
Trying to understand the chemistry that turns plant material into the same energy-rich gasoline and diesel we put in our vehicles, researchers have discovered that water in the conversion process helps form an impurity which, in turn, slows down key chemical reactions.
Department of Energy

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 19-Aug-2014
Agewandte Chemie
NMR using Earth's magnetic field
Berkeley Lab researchers carried out nuclear magnetic resonance experiments using an ultra-low magnetic field comparable to Earth's magnetic field.

Contact: Rachel Berkowitz
rberkowitz@lbl.gov
510-486-7254
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 19-Aug-2014
Physical Review Letters
First indirect evidence of so-far undetected strange baryons
New supercomputing calculations provide the first evidence that particles predicted by the theory of quark-gluon interactions but never before observed are being produced in heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider.
Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing program of the DOE Office of Science (Nuclear Physics and Advanced Scientific Computing Research), Federal Ministry of Education and Research of Germany, German Research Foundation

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Bionic liquids from lignin
Bionic liquids -- solvents made from lignin and hemicellulose, two by-products of biofuel production -- show great promise for liberating fermentable sugars from lignocellulose and improving the economics of biofuels refineries.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Dark Energy Survey kicks off second season cataloging the wonders of deep space
On Aug. 15, with its successful first season behind it, the Dark Energy Survey collaboration began its second year of mapping the southern sky in unprecedented detail. Using the Dark Energy Camera, a 570-megapixel imaging device built by the collaboration and mounted on the Victor M. Blanco Telescope in Chile, the survey's five-year mission is to unravel the fundamental mystery of dark energy and its impact on our universe.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Andre Salles
asalles@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Nature Communications
Promising ferroelectric materials suffer from unexpected electric polarizations
Brookhaven Lab scientists find surprising locked charge polarizations that explain the poor performance of next-gen materials that would otherwise revolutionize data-driven devices.
US Department of Energy's Office of Science

Contact: Justin Eure
jeure@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Science
Mysteries of space dust revealed
The first analysis of space dust collected by a special collector onboard NASA's Stardust mission and sent back to Earth for study in 2006 suggests the tiny specks, which likely originated from beyond our solar system, are more complex in composition and structure than previously imagined.
NASA, Klaus Tschira Foundation, Tawani Foundation, German Science Foundation, Funds for Scientific Research (Flanders, Belgium)

Contact: Kate Greene
kgreene@lbl.gov
510-486-4404
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 12-Aug-2014
Ames Laboratory's Thiel winner of 2014 Welch Award
Pat Thiel has been named the 2014 winner of the American Vacuum Society Medard W. Welch Award, which recognizes outstanding research in the fields of materials, interfaces and processing. Thiel, who is a faculty scientist at the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory and a Distinguished Professor of chemistry at Iowa State University, is recognized for her 'seminal contributions to the understanding of quasicrystalline surfaces and thin-film nucleation and growth.'

Contact: Breehan Gerleman Lucchesi
breehan@ameslab.gov
515-294-9750
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Aug-2014
Two NREL scientists named to highly cited researcher list
Two scientists at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory have been included in Thomson Reuters' Highly Cited Research list for the thousands of citations of their work by fellow researchers over the past decade.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Aug-2014
NREL research earns 2 prestigious R&D 100 Awards
A growth system that can produce thin solar cells quickly and at low cost, and an ultra-efficient supercomputer platform -- both developed or advanced by the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory and its partners -- have been named among this year's most significant innovations by R&D Magazine.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Aug-2014
NREL uses industry best practices to add partners
The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory is accelerating the availability of next-generation energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies in the marketplace by making it easier for industry partners to work with the laboratory.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 5-Aug-2014
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, August 2014
1) Glass used for military vehicle windshields is being put to the test. 2) Tomorrow's commercial refrigeration systems could be cooled by carbon dioxide. 3) Graphite put to the test . 4) Reformulated plant matter could be at the roots of a revolution in 3-D printing. 5) Batteries for cars, phones, and laptop computers could retain their charge and last longer.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Aug-2014
Nature Communications
Bottling up sound waves
Berkeley Lab researchers have developed a technique for generating acoustic bottles in open air that can bend the paths of sound waves along prescribed convex trajectories. These self-bending bottle beams hold promise for ultrasonic imaging and therapy, and acoustic cloaking, levitation and particle manipulation.
Office of Naval Research

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Aug-2014
Nature Communications
Nanoscale details of electrochemical reactions in electric vehicle battery materials
Using a new method to track the electrochemical reactions in a common electric vehicle battery material under operating conditions, scientists have revealed new insight into why fast charging inhibits this material's performance. The results could inform battery makers' efforts to optimize materials for faster-charging batteries with higher capacity.
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory, US Department of Energy

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 1-Aug-2014
Nature Communications
'Wetting' a battery's appetite for renewable energy storage
A new liquid metal alloy material enables sodium-beta batteries to operate at lower temperatures, which could help the batteries store more renewable energy and strengthen the power grid.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Franny White
frances.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
Los Alamos laser selected for 2020 Mars mission
NASA announced today that laser technology originally developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory has been selected for its new Mars mission in 2020.

Contact: James E. Rickman
jamesr@lanl.gov
505-665-9203
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
Science
Nanostructured metal-oxide catalyst efficiently converts CO2 to methanol
Scientists have discovered a new catalytic system for converting carbon dioxide (CO2) to methanol -- a key commodity used to create a wide range of industrial chemicals and fuels. With significantly higher activity than other catalysts now in use, the new system could make it easier to get normally unreactive CO2 to participate in these reactions.
DOE/Office of Science, Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad of Spain, European Regional Development Fund, Instituto de Tecnologia Venezolana para el Petroleo

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
How sweet it is
JBEI researchers have developed a powerful new tool that can help advance the genetic engineering of 'fuel' crops for clean, green and renewable bioenergy -- an assay that enables scientists to identify and characterize the function of nucleotide sugar transporters, critical components in the biosynthesis of plant cell walls.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
ORNL study reveals new characteristics of complex oxide surfaces
A combination of microscopy and data processing has given researchers an unprecedented look at the surface of a material known for its unusual physical and electrochemical properties.

Contact: Morgan McCorkle
mccorkleml@ornl.gov
865-574-7308
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Three PNNL staff elected to membership in state academy
Don Baer, Alain Bonneville, and Jud Virden, three scientists at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, have been selected to join the Washington State Academy of Sciences.

Contact: MaryAnne Wuennecke
maryanne.wuennecke@pnnl.gov
509-375-2447
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Jul-2014
Nature Materials
A noble gas cage
A new material called CC3 effectively traps xenon, krypton, and radon. These gases are used in industries such as lighting or medicine and, in the case of radon, one that can be hazardous when it accumulates in buildings. Research appearing on July 20th in Nature Materials shows how: by breathing enough to let the gases in but not out. The results might lead to cheaper, less energy intensive ways to extract these gases.
Department of Energy, Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Jul-2014
Physical Review Letters
First ab initio method for characterizing hot carriers
Berkeley Lab researchers have developed the first ab initio method for characterizing the properties of 'hot carriers' in semiconductors. This should help clear a major road block to the development of new, more efficient solar cells.
US Department of Energy Office of Science, National Science Foundation

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Jul-2014
Nature
Peering into giant planets from in and out of this world
Lawrence Livermore scientists for the first time have experimentally re-created the conditions that exist deep inside giant planets, such as Jupiter, Uranus and many of the planets recently discovered outside our solar system.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Jul-2014
Nanotechnology
Fundamental chemistry findings could help extend Moore's Law
In a bid to continue decreasing transistor size while increasing computation and energy efficiency, chip-maker Intel has partnered with researchers from the US Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Lab to design an entirely new kind of resist. Results could be easily incorporated by companies that make resist, and find their way into manufacturing lines as early as 2017.
Intel, JSR Micro, US Department of Energy

Contact: Kate Greene
kgreene@lbl.gov
510-486-4404
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Showing releases 26-50 out of 142.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>

 

 

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