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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 51-75 out of 138.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>

Public Release: 13-Feb-2014
Physical Review Letters
Superconductivity in orbit: Scientists find new path to loss-free electricity
Researchers at the US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory have combined atoms with multiple orbitals and precisely pinned down their electron distributions. Using advanced electron diffraction techniques, the scientists discovered that orbital fluctuations in iron-based compounds induce strongly coupled polarizations that can enhance electron pairing -- the essential mechanism behind superconductivity.
US Department of Energy's Office of Science

Contact: Justin Eure
jeure@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
Department of Energy speakers and sessions at AAAS
Attendees of the 2014 AAAS Annual Meeting are invited to the events at which representatives from DOE's Office of Science and its labs will play an active part.

Contact: Rick Borchelt
rick.borchelt@science.doe.gov
DOE/US Department of Energy

Public Release: 12-Feb-2014
Nature
NIF experiments show initial gain in fusion fuel
Ignition the process of releasing fusion energy equal to or greater than the amount of energy used to confine the fuel has long been considered the "holy grail" of inertial confinement fusion science. A key step along the path to ignition is to have "fuel gains" greater than unity, where the energy generated through fusion reactions exceeds the amount of energy deposited into the fusion fuel.

Contact: Breanna Bishop
bishop33@llnl.gov
925-423-9802
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Feb-2014
NREL report finds similar value in 2 CSP technologies
Parabolic troughs and dry-cooled towers deliver similar value for concentrating solar power plants, despite different solar profiles, a new report by the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory has found.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Feb-2014
NREL director Arvizu elected to National Academy of Engineering
Dan Arvizu, director of the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory, has been elected to membership in the National Academy of Engineering.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Feb-2014
2014 AAAS Annual Meeting
Targeting tumors: Ion beam accelerators take aim at cancer
Hear the latest in the development of particle accelerators for delivering cancer-killing beams from a physicist, a radiobiologist, and a clinical oncologist, and participate in a discussion about cost, access, and ethics.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 7-Feb-2014
Anderson recognized with TMS Application to Practice Award
Iver Anderson, senior metallurgist at the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory, has been chosen as a recipient of the 2014 Application to Practice Award by the Minerals, Metals and Materials Society.
Minerals, Metals and Materials Society

Contact: Laura Millsaps
millsaps@ameslab.gov
515-294-3474
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Public Release: 5-Feb-2014
Nature Materials
Crossover sound
The first "unambiguous demonstration" of the atomic-scale sound waves known as phonons crossing over from particle-like to wave-like behavior in superlattices opens the door to improved thermoelectrics and possibly even phonon lasers.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 5-Feb-2014
Nature
Quarks in the looking glass
A recent experiment carried out at DOE's Jefferson Lab has determined how much of the mirror-symmetry breaking in the electron-quark interaction originates from quarks' spin preference in the weak interaction five times more precisely than a previous measurement. The result has also set new limits, in a way complementary to high-energy colliders such as the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, for the energies that researchers would need to access physics beyond the Standard Model.
Department of Energy Office of Science, National Science Foundation Division of Physics, Jeffress Memorial Trust

Contact: Kandice Carter
kcarter@jlab.org
757-269-7263
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

Public Release: 4-Feb-2014
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, February 2014
This release focuses on 1) LEDs to light UT arena. 2) Self-cleaning solar panel. 3) Bioenergy researchers defeating lignin. 4) Protection for utilities. 5) New tool for first responders.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Feb-2014
Nature Communications
Good hair day: New technique grows tiny 'hairy' materials at the microscale
Scientists at Argonne National Laboratory attacked a tangled problem by developing a new technique to grow tiny "hairy" materials that assemble themselves at the microscale.
US Department of Energy's Office of Science, Russian Russian Foundation for Basic Research

Contact: Louise Lerner
Louise@anl.gov
630-252-5526
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Jan-2014
NREL study: Active power control of wind turbines can improve power grid reliability
The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory, along with partners from the Electric Power Research Institute and the University of Colorado have completed a comprehensive study to understand how wind power technology can assist the power grid by controlling the active power output being placed onto the system. The rest of the power system's resources have traditionally been adjusted around wind to support a reliable and efficient system. The research that led to this report challenges that concept.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 27-Jan-2014
Physical Review Letters
ORNL study advances quest for better superconducting materials
Nearly 30 years after the discovery of high-temperature superconductivity, many questions remain, but an Oak Ridge National Laboratory team is providing insight that could lead to better superconductors.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Jan-2014
Nature Communications
Cooling microprocessors with carbon nanotubes
Berkeley Lab researchers at the Molecular Foundry have developed a "process friendly" technique to enable the cooling of microprocessor chips through the use of carbon nanotubes.
US Department of Energy Office of Science, Intel Corporation

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Jan-2014
Small Satellites
Lawrence Livermore 'space cops' to help control traffic in space
A team of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory scientists are using mini-satellites that work as "space cops" to help control traffic in space.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Jan-2014
Energy and Building
White, green or black roofs? Berkeley Lab report compares economic payoffs
Looking strictly at the economic costs and benefits of three different roof types -- black, white and "green" (or vegetated) -- Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory researchers have found in a new study that white roofs are the most cost-effective over a 50-year time span. While the high installation cost of green roofs sets them back in economic terms, their environmental and amenity benefits may at least partially mitigate their financial burden.

Contact: Julie Chao
jhchao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
E-whiskers
Researchers with Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley have created e-whiskers -- highly sensitive tactile sensors made from carbon nanotubes and silver nanoparticles that should have a wide range of applications including advanced robotics, human-machine interfaces, and biological and environmental sensors.
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Jan-2014
NREL working to clean air in fracking process
A microbe capable of digesting methane could save countless tons of greenhouse gas from reaching the atmosphere during the hydraulic fracturing process. Hydraulic fracturing, also known as fracking, uses pressurized water to fracture rock to release natural gas. It's been a boon to local economies and a source of inexpensive fuels -- but if nothing is done to capture the byproduct methane, which is typically flared in the air, it can also contribute heftily to greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Jan-2014
NREL model licensed to improve accuracy of battery simulations
The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory has licensed its Equivalent Circuit Battery Model to software developer ThermoAnalytics for use in its recently updated RadTherm software package.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Jan-2014
Nature Communications
Highly efficient broadband terahertz radiation from metamaterials
Scientists at the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory have demonstrated broadband terahertz wave generation using metamaterials. The discovery may help develop noninvasive imaging and sensing, and make possible terahertz-speed information communication, processing and storage.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Breehan Gerleman Lucchesi
breehan@ameslab.gov
515-294-9750
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Jan-2014
Science
Natural 3-D counterpart to graphene discovered
A natural 3-D counterpart to 2-D graphene with similar or even better electron mobility and velocity has been discovered at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source. This discovery promises exciting new things to come for the high-tech industry, including much faster transistors and far more compact hard drives.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Hugging hemes help electrons hop
Researchers simulating how certain bacteria run electrical current through tiny molecular wires have discovered a secret Nature uses for electron travel. This is the first time scientists have seen this evolutionary design principle for electron transport.
US Department of Energy, Royal Society

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Jan-2014
LLNL partnership with Calysta works to convert natural gas to liquid fuel
In an effort to put to good use natural gas (methane) that might otherwise become pollution, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is collaborating with start-up company Calysta Energy on a new technology to convert natural gas to liquid fuel.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Jan-2014
Europhysics Letters
A deeper look at interfaces
A technique developed at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source makes it possible for the first time to selectively study the electronic structure of buried interfaces in multilayer nanodevices. The technique is called Standing Wave Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Jan-2014
Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics
Argonne scientists discover new pathway for artificial photosynthesis
Currently, the most efficient methods that we have of making fuel -- principally hydrogen -- from sunlight and water involve rare and expensive metal catalysts, like platinum. In a new study, researchers at the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory have found a new, more efficient way to link a less expensive synthetic cobalt-containing catalyst to an organic light-sensitive molecule, called a chromophore.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Showing releases 51-75 out of 138.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>

 

 

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