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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 51-75 out of 271.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

Public Release: 10-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
PPPL scientists take key step toward solving a major astrophysical mystery
Magnetic reconnection can trigger geomagnetic storms that disrupt cell phone service, damage satellites and black out power grids. But how reconnection, in which the magnetic field lines in plasma snap apart and violently reconnect, transforms magnetic energy into explosive particle energy remains a major unsolved problem in plasma astrophysics.
US Department of Energy as well, Center for Magnetic Self-Organization

Contact: John Greenwald
jgreenwa@pppl.gov
609-243-2672
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
Crystal Solar and NREL team up to cut costs
A faster, cheaper way to manufacture silicon solar cells, partially funded by the Energy Department and fine-tuned at its National Renewable Energy Laboratory, has won a coveted R&D 100 award as one of the top technology innovations of 2013.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
National Renewable Energy Laboratory updates cetane data used for development of energy efficient fuels and engines
The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory has released a long-anticipated update to the source-of-record for cetane number data. This information is vital to the development of new, energy-efficient, low-carbon fuels and compatible engines. Researchers, as well as members of the engine, vehicle, and fuel industries, rely on these numbers to target compounds for development of new fuels capable of greater energy efficiency, cleaner emissions, and maximum performance in diesel engines.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
Buckyballs and diamondoids join forces in tiny electronic gadget
Scientists have married two unconventional forms of carbon -- one shaped like a soccer ball, the other a tiny diamond -- to make a molecule that conducts electricity in only one direction. This tiny electronic component, known as a rectifier, could play a key role in shrinking chip components down to the size of molecules to enable faster, more powerful devices.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Sep-2014
Science
A metallic alloy that is tough and ductile at cryogenic temperatures
A multi-element high‐entropy alloy not only tests out as one of the toughest materials on record, but, unlike most materials, the toughness as well as the strength and ductility of this alloy actually improves at cryogenic temperatures.
US Department of Energy's Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Sep-2014
Science
Birth of a mineral
One of the most important molecules on earth, calcium carbonate crystallizes into chalk, shells and minerals the world over. In a study led by the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, researchers used a powerful microscope that allows them to see the birth of crystals in real time, giving them a peek at how different calcium carbonate crystals form, they report in Sept. 5 issue of Science.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Sep-2014
Story from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Sept. 2014
1) Precision projectile tracker. 2) Microscopic needles to imprint the patient's corneal tissue. 3) Connecting vehicles could save nearly 3 billion gallons of fuel. 4) Tiny Titan can help middle and high school students explore the fundamental concepts of parallel computing.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Peptoid nanosheets at the oil-water interface
Researchers at Berkeley Lab's Molecular Foundry have developed peptoid nanosheets that form at the interface between oil and water, opening the door to increased structural complexity and chemical functionality for a broad range of applications.
DOE/Office of Science, Defense Threat Reduction Agency

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Nature Materials
Argonne scientists pioneer strategy for creating new materials
Making something new is never easy. Scientists constantly theorize about new materials, but when the material is manufactured it doesn't always work as expected. To create a new strategy for designing materials, scientists at the Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory combined two different approaches at two different facilities to synthesize new materials. This new strategy gives faster feedback on what growth schemes are best, thus shortening the timeframe to manufacture a new, stable material for energy transport and conversion applications.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Tona Kunz
tkunz@anl.gov
630-252-5560
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Science
Mysteries of space dust revealed
The first analysis of space dust collected by a special collector onboard NASA's Stardust mission and sent back to Earth for study in 2006 suggests the tiny specks open a door to studying the origins of the solar system and possibly the origin of life itself.
NASA, US Department of Energy, Klaus Tschira Foundation, Tawani Foundation, German Science Foundation, Funds for Scientific Research -- Flanders, Belgium

Contact: Tona Kunz
tkunz@anl.gov
630-252-5560
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Ames Laboratory scientists named 'Most Influential Scientific Minds'
Three Ames Laboratory physicists, Paul Canfield, Sergey Bud'ko, and Costas Soukoulis, were recently named to Thomson Reuters' World's Most Influential Scientific Minds 2014.

Contact: Laura Millsaps
millsaps@ameslab.gov
515-294-3474
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
RSC Advances
Rubber meets the road with new ORNL carbon, battery technologies
Recycled tires could see new life in lithium-ion batteries.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
Competition for graphene
Berkeley Lab reports the first experimental observation of ultrafast charge transfer in photo-excited MX2 materials, the graphene-like two-dimensional semiconductors. Charge transfer time clocked in at under 50 femtoseconds, comparable to the fastest times recorded for organic photovoltaics.

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Do we live in a 2-D hologram?
A unique experiment at the US Department of Energy's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory called the Holometer has started collecting data that will answer some mind-bending questions about our universe -- including whether we live in a hologram.
DOE Office of Science

Contact: Andre Salles
media@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
New process helps overcome obstacles to produce renewable fuels and chemicals
There's an old saying in the biofuels industry: 'You can make anything from lignin except money.' But now, a new study may pave the way to challenging that adage. The study from the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory demonstrates a concept that provides opportunities for the successful conversion of lignin into a variety of renewable fuels, chemicals, and materials for a sustainable energy economy.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Aug-2014
Science
Shaping the future of nanocrystals
Berkeley Lab researchers have recorded the first direct observations of how facets form and develop on platinum nanocubes in solution, pointing the way towards more sophisticated and effective nanocrystal design and revealing that a nearly 150-year-old scientific law describing crystal growth breaks down at the nanoscale.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Aug-2014
Advanced Materials
ORNL scientists uncover clues to role of magnetism in iron-based superconductors
New measurements of atomic-scale magnetic behavior in iron-based superconductors are challenging conventional wisdom about superconductivity and magnetism.
US Department of Energy Office of Science, National Science Foundation

Contact: Morgan McCorkle
mccorkleml@ornl.gov
865-574-7308
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Aug-2014
Science
Researchers map quantum vortices inside superfluid helium nanodroplets
Scientists have, for the first time, characterized so-called quantum vortices that swirl within tiny droplets of liquid helium. The research, led by scientists at the US Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory , the University of Southern California, and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, confirms that helium nanodroplets are in fact the smallest possible superfluidic objects and opens new avenues to study quantum rotation.
National Science Foundation, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences Division

Contact: Kate Greene
kgreene@lbl.gov
510-486-4404
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Aug-2014
Science
X-ray laser probes tiny quantum tornadoes in superfluid droplets
An experiment at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory revealed a well-organized 3-D grid of quantum 'tornadoes' inside microscopic droplets of supercooled liquid helium -- the first time this formation has been seen at such a tiny scale. The findings by an international research team provide new insight on the strange nanoscale traits of a so-called 'superfluid' state of liquid helium.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
American Chemical Society 248th National Meeting & Exposition
Journal of American Chemical Society
Water leads to chemical that gunks up biofuels production
Trying to understand the chemistry that turns plant material into the same energy-rich gasoline and diesel we put in our vehicles, researchers have discovered that water in the conversion process helps form an impurity which, in turn, slows down key chemical reactions.
Department of Energy

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 19-Aug-2014
Agewandte Chemie
NMR using Earth's magnetic field
Berkeley Lab researchers carried out nuclear magnetic resonance experiments using an ultra-low magnetic field comparable to Earth's magnetic field.

Contact: Rachel Berkowitz
rberkowitz@lbl.gov
510-486-7254
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 19-Aug-2014
Physical Review Letters
First indirect evidence of so-far undetected strange baryons
New supercomputing calculations provide the first evidence that particles predicted by the theory of quark-gluon interactions but never before observed are being produced in heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider.
Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing program of the DOE Office of Science (Nuclear Physics and Advanced Scientific Computing Research), Federal Ministry of Education and Research of Germany, German Research Foundation

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Bionic liquids from lignin
Bionic liquids -- solvents made from lignin and hemicellulose, two by-products of biofuel production -- show great promise for liberating fermentable sugars from lignocellulose and improving the economics of biofuels refineries.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Dark Energy Survey kicks off second season cataloging the wonders of deep space
On Aug. 15, with its successful first season behind it, the Dark Energy Survey collaboration began its second year of mapping the southern sky in unprecedented detail. Using the Dark Energy Camera, a 570-megapixel imaging device built by the collaboration and mounted on the Victor M. Blanco Telescope in Chile, the survey's five-year mission is to unravel the fundamental mystery of dark energy and its impact on our universe.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Andre Salles
asalles@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Nature Communications
Promising ferroelectric materials suffer from unexpected electric polarizations
Brookhaven Lab scientists find surprising locked charge polarizations that explain the poor performance of next-gen materials that would otherwise revolutionize data-driven devices.
US Department of Energy's Office of Science

Contact: Justin Eure
jeure@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Showing releases 51-75 out of 271.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

 

 

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