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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 41.

1 | 2 > >>

Public Release: 16-Jul-2015
Science
Unearthing cornerstones in root microbiomes
A plant's immune system can distinguish between friends and foes among these microbes, and upon detecting pathogens, can produce regulatory chemicals called phytohormones to activate a defensive response. In a study published online July 16, 2015, in Science Express, a team including scientists from the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute looked at roles of three phytohormones in controlling the composition of the root microbiome in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 15-Jul-2015
FASEB Journal
Closer look at microorganism provides insight on carbon cycling
An Argonne/University of Tennessee research team reconstructed the crystal structure of BAP, a protein involved in the process by which marine archaea release carbon, to determine how it functioned, as well as its larger role in carbon cycling in marine sediments.

Contact: Brian Grabowski
bgrabowski@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Jul-2015
Nature Communications
Gut microbes enable coffee pest to withstand extremely toxic concentrations of caffeine
Berkeley Lab scientists discovered that coffee berry borers worldwide share 14 bacterial species in their digestive tracts that degrade and detoxify caffeine. They also found the most prevalent of these bacteria has a gene that helps break down caffeine. Their research sheds light on the ecology of the destructive bug and could lead to new ways to fight it.
US Department of Agriculture, Laboratory Directed Research and Development program at Berkeley Lab, Mexico's National Council for Science and Technology

Contact: Jon Weiner
jrweiner@lbl.gov
510-486-4014
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Jun-2015
Science
Orange is the new red
Berkeley Lab researchers discovered that a photoprotective mechanism in cyanobacteria is triggered by an unprecedented, large-scale movement from one location to another of the carotenoid pigment within the Orange Carotenoid Protein.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Jun-2015
Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry
New tool on horizon for surgeons treating cancer patients
Surgeons could know while their patients are still on the operating table if a tissue is cancerous, according to researchers from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Brigham and Women's Hospital/Harvard Medical School.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Jun-2015
ISME Journal
Automating microbial genome sequence decontamination
Single cell genomics and metagenomics have helped researchers assess environmental microbial community structure and function. To help speed up the time-consuming sequence decontamination process of microbial genomes in public databases, a US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute team has developed the first computational protocol for quick and automated removal of contaminant sequences from draft genomes and describe it in a study published online June 9, 2015, in The ISME Journal.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 13-May-2015
Blood
Starving cancer cells instead of feeding them poison
An enzyme-drug that prevents the essential nutrient asparagine from reaching cancer cells seem an effective way to kill them, but that enzyme-drug also does away with the nutrient glutamine that all cells need. Now a simulation has directed the mutation of the enzyme so that, in wet labs, it left normal cells unharmed in Petri dishes and cancer cells dead in test tubes. Lab tests are underway with mice. If successful, human tests are next.
Sandia National Laboratories' Laboratory-Directed Research and Development

Contact: Neal Singer
nsinger@sandia.gov
505-845-7078
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 12-May-2015
mBio
Using microbial communities to assess environmental contamination
A study sponsored by ENIGMA, a DOE 'Scientific Focus Area Program' based at the Berkeley Lab has found that statistical analysis of DNA from natural microbial communities can be used to accurately identify environmental contaminants and serve as quantitative geochemical biosensors.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 12-May-2015
Tests with Sandia's Davis gun aid B61-12 life extension effort
Sandia National Laboratories successfully completed a three-test series with its cannon-like Davis gun.

Contact: Sue Holmes
sholmes@sandia.gov
505-844-6362
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 14-Apr-2015
Nature Scientific Data
New ORNL, NC State and LanzaTech DNA dataset is potent, accessible tool
Scientists focused on producing biofuels more efficiently have a new powerful dataset to help them study the DNA of microbes that fuel bioconversion and other processes.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
X-ray ptychography, fluorescence microscopy combo sheds new light on trace elements
Scientists have developed a new approach that combines ptychographic X-ray imaging and fluorescence microscopy to study the important role trace elements play in biological functions on hydrated cells.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Energy, National Center for Research Resources

Contact: Tona Kunz
tkunz@anl.gov
630-252-5560
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 1-Apr-2015
Genome Research
Longer DNA fragments reveal rare species diversity
A challenge in metagenomics is that the more commonly used sequencing machines generate data in short lengths, while short-read assemblers may not be able to distinguish among multiple occurrences of the same or similar sequences, making it difficult to identify all the members in a microbial community. In the April 2015 issue of Genome Research, a team including DOE JGI researchers compared two ways of using next generation Illumina sequencing machines to help with this.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 26-Mar-2015
MESA complex starts largest production series in its history
Sandia National Laboratories has begun making silicon wafers for three nuclear weapon modernization programs, the largest production series in the history of its Microsystems and Engineering Sciences Applications complex.

Contact: Sue Holmes
sholmes@sandia.gov
505-844-6362
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 19-Mar-2015
Explosive Destruction System begins first stockpile project
This week the Explosive Destruction System (EDS), designed by Sandia National Laboratories for the US Army, began safely destroying stockpile chemical munitions. The project to destroy 560 chemical munitions at the US Army Pueblo Chemical Depot in Colorado with EDS is a prelude to a much larger operation to destroy the stockpile of 780,000 munitions containing 2,600 tons of mustard agent, stored at the Pueblo depot since the 1950s.
US Army

Contact: Patti Koning
pkoning@sandia.gov
925-294-4911
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 19-Mar-2015
Sandia showcases biology breakthroughs available for licensing
Technologies developed in Sandia National Laboratories' biosciences program could soon find their way into doctors' offices -- devices like wearable microneedles that continuously analyze electrolyte levels and a lab-on-a-disk that can test a drop of blood for 64 different diseases in minutes. At a recent seminar for potential investors and licensees, part of the Sandia Technology Showcase series, Sandia bioscientists presented eight ready-to-license technologies in three key areas: medical diagnostics, biosurveillance and therapeutics and drug discovery.

Contact: Patti Koning
pkoning@sandia.gov
925-294-4911
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 18-Mar-2015
Nucleic Acids Research
Los Alamos creates bioinformatics tool for metagenome analysis
Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed a new method for DNA analysis of microbial communities such as those found in the ocean, the soil, and our own guts.
Defense Threat Reduction Agency/Chemical and Biological Technologies-Joint Science and Technology Office

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Mar-2015
Nature
Permafrost's turn of the microbes
As the Arctic warms, tons of carbon locked away in Arctic tundra will be transformed into the powerful greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and methane, but scientists know little about how that transition takes place. In a study appearing in today's issue of Nature, scientists looking at microbes in different types of Arctic soil have a new picture of life in permafrost that reveals entirely new species and hints that subzero microbes might be active.
Department of Energy, United States Geological Survey, Academy of Finland

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Mar-2015
Nature
Characterizing permafrost microbes in a changing climate
With global temperatures projected to rise over the coming centuries, the frozen Arctic soils may thaw completely, potentially causing the largest contribution of carbon transferred to the atmosphere by a single terrestrial process. To better characterize the microbial activities in the permafrost, scientists from the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute reported on the application of multiple molecular technologies -- 'omics' -- in a paper published online March 4, 2015, in Nature.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
925-296-5643
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 2-Mar-2015
10th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting
10th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting
Register now for 10th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting. The US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute has assembled a roster of dynamic speakers and workshops for its Annual Meeting, March 23-26, 2015.

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
925-296-5643
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 2-Mar-2015
Nature
Unlocking the key to immunological memory in bacteria
A powerful genome editing tool may soon become even more powerful. Berkeley Lab researchers have unlocked the key to how bacteria are able to 'steal' genetic information from viruses and other foreign invaders for use in their own immunological memory system.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
Nature Genetics
Retracing the roots of fungal symbioses
In the roots of host plants, mycorrhizal fungi exchange the sugars plants produce for nutrients they absorb from the soil. To understand the basis for fungal symbiotic relationships with plants, DOE Joint Genome Institute researchers and longtime collaborators reported the first broad, comparative phylogenomic analysis of mycorrhizal fungi in the Feb. 23, 2015 edition of Nature Genetics. The results help researchers understand how the mutualistic association provides host plants with beneficial traits for environmental adaptation.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
925-296-5643
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 11-Feb-2015
2015 AAAS Annual Meeting
Berkeley Lab researchers at AAAS
Can more accurate climate models help us understand extreme weather events? What can we expect with the upcoming restart of the Large Hadron Collider and what does the future of accelerators look like? These questions, and the ongoing search for a better battery, are just some of the many presentations by Berkeley Lab researchers at this year's AAAS meeting. And don't forget to stop by our booth (#406) in the Exhibit Hall this week.

Contact: Jon Weiner
jrweiner@lbl.gov
510-486-4014
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Feb-2015
Nature
Scientists call for antibody 'bar code' system to follow Human Genome Project
More than 100 researchers from around the world have collaborated to craft a request that could fundamentally alter how the antibodies used in research are identified, a project potentially on the scale of the now-completed Human Genome Project.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 30-Jan-2015
PNNL recognized for moving biofuel, chemical analysis innovations to market
Developing renewable fuel from wet algae and enabling analysis of complex liquids are two of the latest innovations Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has successfully driven to the market with the help of commercial partners.

Contact: Eric Francavilla
eric.francavilla@pnnl.gov
509-372-4066
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 1-Dec-2014
Metabolic Engineering
Sweet smell of success
JBEI researchers have engineered E. coli bacteria to convert glucose into significant quantities of methyl ketones, a class of chemical compounds primarily used for fragrances and flavors, but highly promising as clean, green and renewable blending agents for diesel fuel.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Showing releases 1-25 out of 41.

1 | 2 > >>

 

 

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