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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-23 out of 23.

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
Angewandte Chemie International Edition
Halving hydrogen
Like a hungry diner ripping open a dinner roll, a fuel cell catalyst that converts hydrogen into electricity must tear open a hydrogen molecule. Now researchers have captured a view of such a catalyst holding onto the two halves of its hydrogen feast. The view confirms previous hypotheses and provides insight into how to make the catalyst work better for alternative energy uses, researchers reported in Angewandte Chemie International Edition.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Pocket-sized anthrax detector aids global agriculture
A credit-card-sized anthrax detection cartridge developed at Sandia National Laboratories and recently licensed to a small business makes testing safer, easier, faster and cheaper.

Contact: Stephanie Holinka
slholin@sandia.gov
505-284-9227
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 10-Apr-2014
Princeton, PPPL join major arms-control project
Princeton University and the Princeton Plasma Physics Physics Laboratory have joined a $25 million consortium to address technology and policy issues related to arms control.
National Nuclear Security Administration

Contact: John Greenwald
609-243-2672
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Mar-2014
Nature Communications
Resistance is not futile
Researchers with the Joint BioEnergy Institute have identified the genetic origins of a microbial resistance to ionic liquids and successfully introduced this resistance into a strain of E. coli bacteria for the production of advanced biofuels.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Mar-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
A tale of 2 data sets: New DNA analysis strategy helps researchers cut through the dirt
Researchers from Michigan State University, the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, have published the largest soil DNA sequencing effort to date in PNAS. What has emerged in this first of the studies to come from this project is a simple, elegant solution to sifting through the deluge of information gleaned, as well as a sobering reality check on just how hard a challenge these environments will be.
Department of Energy Office of Science, US Department of Agriculture, National Science Foundation, Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
925-296-5643
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 6-Feb-2014
Science
New insight into an emerging genome-editing tool
A collaboration led by Berkeley Lab's Jennifer Doudna and Eva Nogales has produced the first detailed look at the 3D structure of the Cas9 enzyme and how it partners with guide RNA to interact with target DNA. The results should enhance Cas9's value and versatility as a genome-editing tool.
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, National Science Foundation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Jan-2014
Nature
Puzzling question in bacterial immune system answered
Berkeley researchers have answered a central question about Cas9, an enzyme that plays an essential role in the bacterial immune system and is fast becoming a valuable tool for genetic engineering: How is Cas9 able to precisely discriminate between non-self DNA that must be degraded and self DNA that may be almost identical within genomes that are millions to billions of base pairs long.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Jan-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Hugging hemes help electrons hop
Researchers simulating how certain bacteria run electrical current through tiny molecular wires have discovered a secret Nature uses for electron travel. This is the first time scientists have seen this evolutionary design principle for electron transport.
US Department of Energy, Royal Society

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Jan-2014
Physical Review Letters
Fusion instabilities lessened by unexpected effect
Introducition of a secondary, weaker magnetic field into a fusion experiment at Sandia's Z machine unexpectedly reduced the plasma disturbance that customarily sinks fusion efforts.
National Nuclear Security Administratoin

Contact: Neal Singer
nsinger@sandia.gov
505-845-7078
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 7-Jan-2014
Science
NREL finds a new cellulose digestion mechanism by a fast-eating enzyme
Researchers at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory have discovered that an enzyme from a microorganism first found in the Valley of Geysers on the Kamchatka Peninsula in Russia in 1990 can digest cellulose almost twice as fast as the current leading component cellulase enzyme on the market.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Dec-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
A wrong molecular turn leads down the path to Type 2 diabetes
Computing resources at the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory have helped researchers better grasp how proteins misfold to create the tissue-damaging structures that lead to type 2 diabetes. The structures, called amyloid fibrils, are also implicated in neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, and in prion diseases like Creutzfeldt-Jacob and mad cow disease.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Brian Grabowski
bgrabowski@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Dec-2013
Acta Crystallographica
Scientists reduce protein crystal damage, improve pharmaceutical development
Researchers at the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory, in collaboration with two other institutions, have identified a method for protein crystallography that reduces damage to the protein crystal. This will allow crystals to be studied for longer periods of time as researchers study protein structures for new pharmaceuticals.
US Department of Energy Office of Science, National Science Foundation

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Dec-2013
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, December 2013
The following are story ideas from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory for December 2013.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Dec-2013
2013 AGU Fall Meeting
At AGU: Shale sequestration, water for energy & soil microbes
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientists will present research on carbon sequestration at shale gas sites, water needs for energy production, climate-induced changes in microbes and more at the 2013 American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, Dec. 9-13.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Franny White
franny.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Dec-2013
Argonne partners with Metropolitan Water Reclamation District to study Chicago River microbe population
Argonne National Laboratory scientists are partnering with the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago to find out the typical sources and distribution of microbial communities in Chicago-area waterways.
Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago

Contact: Louise Lerner
media@anl.gov
630-252-5526
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Dec-2013
Engineer honored for contributions to precision strike systems
The chief engineer of Conventional Prompt Global Strike programs at Sandia National Laboratories has been honored with a national award for his outstanding contributions to precision strike systems.

Contact: Heather Clark
hclark@sandia.gov
505-844-3511
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 25-Nov-2013
Cell
The inner workings of a bacterial black box caught on time-lapse video
Using a pioneering visualization method, researchers from the UC Berkeley and the Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute made movies of a complex and vital cellular machine called the carboxysome being assembled inside living cells. They observed that bacteria build these internal compartments in a way never seen in plant, animal and other eukaryotic cells. The findings, published Nov. 21, 2013, in the journal Cell, will illuminate bacterial physiology and may also influence nanotechnology development.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
925-296-5643
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 25-Nov-2013
ACS Chemical Biology
Scientists capture 'redox moments' in living cells
Scientists have glimpsed key chemical events, known as redox reactions, inside living cells of fast-growing Synechococcus. The work marks the first time that redox activity, a very fast regulatory network involved in all major aspects of a cell's operation, has been observed in specific proteins within living cells. The findings hone scientists' control over a common tool in the biofuels toolbox -- a microbe that supplies some of the oxygen you breathe.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3772
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Nov-2013
Frontiers in Microbiology
Lignin-feasting microbe holds promise for biofuels
Researchers at the Joint BioEnergy Institute have identified a rain forest microbe that feasts on the lignin in plant leaf litter, making it a potential ally for the cost-effective production of advanced biofuels.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 12-Nov-2013
Journal of Biological Chemistry
Structure of bacterial nanowire protein hints at secrets of conduction
Tiny electrical wires protrude from some bacteria and contribute to rock and dirt formation. Researchers studying the protein that makes up one such wire have determined the protein's structure. The finding is important to such diverse fields as producing energy, recycling Earth's carbon and miniaturizing computers.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Nov-2013
Molecular Biosystems
Crafting a better enzyme cocktail to turn plants into fuel faster
Scientists looking to create a potent blend of enzymes to transform materials like corn stalks and wood chips into fuels have developed a test that should turbocharge their efforts. The work revolves around the fungus Trichoderma reesei, which introduced itself to US troops during World War II by chewing through their tents in the Pacific theater. Now the fungus is a star in the world of biofuels.
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Oct-2013
Expanding research communities and collaborations
From the depths of oceans, to wide swaths of forests, and rising to the troposphere, where weather changes occur, the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2014 Community Science Program portfolio seeks to parse functional information extracted from complex ecosystems to address urgent energy and environmental challenges. These massive, data-intensive undertakings require interdisciplinary approaches, many leveraging additional expertise through a new inter-DOE-Facility partnership.
US Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
925-296-5643
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 29-Oct-2013
Nature Biotechnology
Less toxic metabolites, more chemical product
By preventing the build-up of toxic metabolites in engineered microbes, a dynamic regulatory system developed at JBEI can help boost production of an advanced biofuel, a therapeutic drug, or other valuable chemical products. The system has already been used to double the production in E. coli of amorphadiene, a precursor to the premier antimalarial drug artemisinin.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Showing releases 1-23 out of 23.

 

 

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