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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 34.

1 | 2 > >>

Public Release: 1-Dec-2014
Metabolic Engineering
Sweet smell of success
JBEI researchers have engineered E. coli bacteria to convert glucose into significant quantities of methyl ketones, a class of chemical compounds primarily used for fragrances and flavors, but highly promising as clean, green and renewable blending agents for diesel fuel.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Termite of the sea's wood destruction strategy revealed
Shipworms, known as 'termites of the sea,' have vexed mariners and seagoing vessels for centuries. A recent study involving scientists from the Ocean Genome Legacy Center of New England Biolabs at Northeastern University, the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute, and other institutions has focused on the shipworm Bankia setacea to learn more about the enzymes it utilizes to break down wood for nutrition, information that may prove useful for the generation of biofuels.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
925-296-5643
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 6-Nov-2014
Science
Discovering the undiscovered -- advancing new tools to fill in the microbial tree of life
In a perspective piece published Nov. 6 in the journal Science, Eddy Rubin, Director of the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute discusses why the time is right to apply genomic technologies to discover new life on Earth. 'Nature has been tinkering with life for at least three billion years and we now have a new set of ways to look for novel forms of life that have so far eluded discovery.'
US Department of Energy, DOE/Office of Science, DOE/Office of Biological and Environmental Research

Contact: David Gilbert
davidegilbert@gmail.com
925-296-5643
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
MINER shines in urban emergency response exercise
In a field test in downtown Chicago, Sandia National Laboratories' mobile imager of neutrons for emergency responders (MINER) system identified the exact location of a sealed laboratory radiation source through shielding and at a distance. MINER detects fast neutrons that emanate from special nuclear material and can discriminate the device signature from background radiation and to measure the spectrum of neutrons emitted by it.
DOE/National Nuclear Security Administration, DOE/Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Office of Research and Development

Contact: Patti Koning
pkoning@sandia.gov
925-294-4911
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
Nature
Tiny carbon nanotube pores make big impact
A team led by the Lawrence Livermore scientists has created a new kind of ion channel based on short carbon nanotubes, which can be inserted into synthetic bilayers and live cell membranes to form tiny pores that transport water, protons, small ions and DNA.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
mBio
Boosting biogasoline production in microbes
Researchers with the Joint BioEnergy Institute have identified microbial genes that can improve both the tolerance and the production of biogasoline in engineered strains of E. coli.
U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Adaptive zoom riflescope prototype has push-button magnification
Sandia National Laboratories announces a prototype of a Rapid Adaptive Zoom for Assault Rifles that would enable the user to zoom in and out at the push of a button without having to remove their eyes from their rifles. The prototype uses a patented adaptive zoom that changes the focal length of the lenses by varying their curvature.

Contact: Heather Clark
hclark@sandia.gov
505-844-3511
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 7-Oct-2014
Bio researchers receive patent to fight superbugs
Superbugs, antibiotic-resistant bacteria, have been on the rise since antibiotics were first introduced 80 years ago. That's because these germ-fighting agents have lost their punch from being overprescribed and misused, allowing bacteria pathogens to develop immunities against them.

Contact: Ken Ma
ma28@llnl.gov
925-423-7602
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Microbiome
MaxBin: Automated sorting through metagenomes
MaxBin is an automated software program for binning the genomes of individual microbial species from metagenomic sequences developed at the Joint BioEnergy Institute.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
2015 DOE JGI's science portfolio delves deeper into the Earth's data mine
In selecting 32 new projects with samples from diverse environments for the 2015 Community Science Program (CSP), the Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute shifts 'from solving an organism's genome sequence to enabling an understanding of what this information enables organisms to do.' The total allocation of the CSP 2015 portfolio is expected to exceed 60 trillion bases -- the equivalent of 20,000 human genomes of plant, fungal and microbial genome sequences.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 22-Sep-2014
Physical Review Letters
Sandia magnetized fusion technique produces significant results
Working with two magnetic fields and a laser, all at low points of their power outputs, Sandia's Z machine has released neutrons in an amount surprisingly close to 'break-even' fusion.
DOE/National Nuclear Security Administration

Contact: neal singer
nsinger@sandia.gov
505-845-7078
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Want to print your own cell phone microscope for pennies? Here's how
A 3-D printing process turns a cell phone into a high-powered microscope for pennies.
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Contact: Susan Bauer
susan.bauer@pnnl.gov
509-372-6083
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
eLife
Decoding virus-host interactions in the oxygen-starved ocean
In certain coastal areas, severe reductions in oxygen levels in the water destroy food web structure. Over the past 50 years, such oxygen minimum zones have expanded due to climate change and increased waste run-off. Reported in the journal eLife, a collaboration between researchers from the Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute, the University of British Columbia, and University of Arizona studied how viral infection influences a microbial community in one such OMZ.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 3-Sep-2014
Story from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Sept. 2014
1) Precision projectile tracker. 2) Microscopic needles to imprint the patient's corneal tissue. 3) Connecting vehicles could save nearly 3 billion gallons of fuel. 4) Tiny Titan can help middle and high school students explore the fundamental concepts of parallel computing.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Science
Home is where the microbes are
A study published today in Science reports provides a detailed analysis of the microbes that live in houses and apartments. The study was conducted by researchers from the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Chicago.
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, National Institutes of Health, US Environmental Protection Agency, National Science Foundation

Contact: Brian Grabowski
bgrabowski@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Breakthrough antibacterial approach could resolve serious skin infections
In several cases, scientists found an ionic liquid was more efficacious on a pathogenic biofilm than a standard bleach treatment and exhibited minimal cytotoxicity effects on human cell lines (unlike bleach). This has excellent prospects for aiding antibiotic delivery to the pathogen through biofilm disruption.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 5-Aug-2014
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, August 2014
1) Glass used for military vehicle windshields is being put to the test. 2) Tomorrow's commercial refrigeration systems could be cooled by carbon dioxide. 3) Graphite put to the test . 4) Reformulated plant matter could be at the roots of a revolution in 3-D printing. 5) Batteries for cars, phones, and laptop computers could retain their charge and last longer.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Jun-2014
Nature
Scientists devloping novel technique that could facilitate nuclear disarmament
Scientist at Princeton University and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory are developing a novel 'zero-knowledge protocol' for nuclear-warhead verification.
Simons Foundation/Global Zero, US Department of State, US Department of Energy, US National Nuclear Security Administration

Contact: John Greenwald
jgreenwa@pppl.gov
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Jun-2014
Genome Research
Study reveals livestock gut microbes contributing to greenhouse gas emissions
The EPA attributes one-fifth of methane emissions to livestock such as cattle, sheep and other ruminants, but the amount of methane produced varies substantially among animals in the same species. As published online June 6, 2014 in Genome Research, a team led by the U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute collaborated with NZ's AgResearch Limited to explore role the microbes living in the rumen play in this process.
U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
925-321-1107
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 8-Jun-2014
Nature Genetics
More than just a hill of beans: Phaseolus genome lends insights into nitrogen fixation
The US Department of Energy Office of Science has targeted research into the common bean because of its importance in enhancing nitrogen use efficiency for bioenergy crops sustainability, and for increasing plant resilience and productivity in the face of the changing climate and environment. To this end, a team of researchers sequenced and analyzed the genome of the common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris. The work was published online June 8, 2014, in the journal Nature Genetics.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
925-321-1107
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 22-May-2014
Science
A glimpse into nature's looking glass -- to find the genetic code is reassigned
It has long been assumed that there is only one 'canonical' genetic code, so each word means the same thing to every organism. Now, this paradigm has been challenged by the discovery of large numbers of exceptions from the canonical genetic code, published by a team of researchers from the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute in the May 23, 2014, edition of the journal Science.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Massie Ballon
mlballon@lbl.gov
925-927-2541
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 9-May-2014
Nature Communications
Salt needed: Tolerance lessons from a dead sea fungus
Some organisms thrive in salty environments by lying dormant when salt concentrations are very high. Other organisms need salt to grow. In the May 9, 2014 issue of Nature Communications, a team including DOE Joint Genome Institute researchers described the genome of a Dead Sea fungus. Understanding how organisms adapt to extremely salty environments could help improve salt tolerance in crops, laying the groundwork of understanding necessary to grow them in desert and saline environments.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
925-927-2541
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
How a plant beckons the bacteria that will do it harm
A common plant puts out a welcome mat to bacteria seeking to invade, and scientists have discovered the mat's molecular mix. The team showed that the humble and oft-studied plant Arabidopsis puts out a molecular signal that invites an attack from a pathogen. The study reveals new targets during the battle between microbe, which often infects tomatoes, and host that researchers can exploit to protect plants.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
Angewandte Chemie International Edition
Halving hydrogen
Like a hungry diner ripping open a dinner roll, a fuel cell catalyst that converts hydrogen into electricity must tear open a hydrogen molecule. Now researchers have captured a view of such a catalyst holding onto the two halves of its hydrogen feast. The view confirms previous hypotheses and provides insight into how to make the catalyst work better for alternative energy uses, researchers reported in Angewandte Chemie International Edition.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Pocket-sized anthrax detector aids global agriculture
A credit-card-sized anthrax detection cartridge developed at Sandia National Laboratories and recently licensed to a small business makes testing safer, easier, faster and cheaper.

Contact: Stephanie Holinka
slholin@sandia.gov
505-284-9227
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Showing releases 1-25 out of 34.

1 | 2 > >>

 

 

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