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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 37.

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Public Release: 4-Feb-2016
Journal of American Chemical Society
Scientists take key step toward custom-made nanoscale chemical factories
Scientists have for the first time reengineered a building block of a geometric nanocompartment that occurs naturally in bacteria to give it a new function.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Feb-2016
Algae raceway paves path from lab to real-world applications
In a twist of geometry, an oval can make a line. The new algae raceway testing facility at Sandia National Laboratories may be oval in shape, but it paves a direct path between laboratory research and solving the demand for clean energy.

Contact: Patti Koning
pkoning@sandia.gov
925-294-4911
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 27-Jan-2016
Nature Communications
Uncovering hidden microbial lineages from hot springs
Although global microbial populations are orders of magnitude larger than nearly any other population in, on or around the planet, only a fraction has been identified thus far. In a Nature Communications study published Jan; 27, 2016, a team led by researchers at the DOE Joint Genome Institute, a DOE Office of Science User Facility, utilized the largest collection of metagenomic datasets to uncover a completely novel bacterial phylum that they have dubbed "Kryptonia."
United States Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
925-296-5643
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 21-Jan-2016
ACS Chemical Biology
Microbes take their vitamins -- for the good of science
Scientists have made a 'vitamin mimic' -- a molecule that looks and acts just like a natural vitamin to bacteria -- that offers a new window into the inner workings of living microbes.
U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 5-Jan-2016
Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators and Beams
Thor's hammer to crush materials at 1 million atmospheres
Thor, expected to be 40 times more efficient than Sandia's Z machine, the world's largest and most powerful pulsed-power accelerator, is expected to dramatically improve the design of similar machines aiming for high-yield fusion.
Sandia's Laboratory Directed Research and Development office, National Nuclear Security Administration's Science Campaign

Contact: Neal Singer
nsinger@sandia.gov
505-845-7078
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 22-Dec-2015
Nano Letters
Nature's masonry: The first steps in how thin protein sheets form polyhedral shells
Scientists have for the first time viewed how bacterial proteins self-assemble into thin sheets and begin to form the walls of the outer shell for nano-sized polyhedral compartments that function as specialized factories. The new insight may aid scientists who seek to tap this natural origami by designing novel compartments or using them as scaffolding for new types of nanoscale architectures, such as drug-delivery systems.
US Department of Energy, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jon Weiner
jrweiner@lbl.gov
510-486-4014
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Nov-2015
Scientific Reports
Microbes map path toward renewable energy future
In the quest for renewable fuels, scientists are taking lessons from a humble bacterium that fills our oceans and covers moist surfaces the world over. Cyanothece 51142, a type of bacteria also called blue-green algae, produces hydrogen in robust fashion, and scientists have found that it taps into an unexpected source of energy to do so.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Oct-2015
Nature
It takes a thief
The discovery by Berkeley Lab researchers of the structural basis by which bacteria are able to capture genetic information from viruses and other foreign invaders for use in their own immunological system holds promise for studying or correcting problems in human genomes.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Oct-2015
Building off known genomes to advance systems and ecosystems biology
The US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI), a DOE Office of Science User Facility, has selected 27 new projects for the 2016 Community Science Program (CSP). The full list of projects may be found at http://jgi.doe.gov/our-projects/csp-plans/fy-2016-csp-plans/. Susannah Tringe, DOE JGI User Programs Deputy, noted that these projects 'build our portfolio in key focus areas including sustainable bioenergy production, plant microbiomes and terrestrial biogeochemistry.'
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
925-296-5643
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 9-Oct-2015
Science Advances
Field widens for environments, microbes that produce toxic form of mercury
Thawing permafrost and contaminated sediment in marine coastal areas pose some of the greatest risks for the production of highly toxic methylmercury.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Sep-2015
Nature Communications
Dirty, crusty meals fit for (long-dormant) microbes
Deploying a set of tools he calls 'exometabolomics,' Trent Northen, a scientist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute, and his team harnessed the analytical capabilities of the latest mass spectrometry techniques to quantitatively measure how individual microbes and the biocrust community transform complex mixtures of metabolites, in this case, from soil. The study published Sept. 22, 2015 in Nature Communications.

Contact: Jon Weiner
jrweiner@lbl.gov
510-486-4014
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 25-Aug-2015
'Laboratory Biorisk Management' details safety, security methods for biosciences sites
Sandia National Laboratories announces a new book, titled 'Laboratory Biorisk Management.' It's the first full-length manuscript detailing the implementation of biorisk management principles to improve the safety and security of biosciences labs.

Contact: Heather Clark
hclark@sandia.gov
505-844-3511
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 14-Aug-2015
Metabolic Engineering
BESC creates microbe that bolsters isobutanol production
Another barrier to commercially viable biofuels from sources other than corn has fallen with the engineering of a microbe that improves isobutanol yields by a factor of 10.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Aug-2015
Cell Host & Microbe
Gut microbes affect circadian rhythms in mice, study says
A study including researchers from the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Chicago found evidence that gut microbes affect circadian rhythms and metabolism in mice.

Contact: Brian Grabowski
bgrabowski@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Aug-2015
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, August 2015
This tip sheet includes: intelligent agent-based software to be showcased at Smithsonian; Supercomputer speeding design, deployment of lightweight powertrain materials; ORNL process produces hydrogen from switchgrass; Sampling probe system identifies bioactive compounds in fungi and ORNL technique could accelerate advances in materials science.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Jul-2015
Science
Unearthing cornerstones in root microbiomes
A plant's immune system can distinguish between friends and foes among these microbes, and upon detecting pathogens, can produce regulatory chemicals called phytohormones to activate a defensive response. In a study published online July 16, 2015, in Science Express, a team including scientists from the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute looked at roles of three phytohormones in controlling the composition of the root microbiome in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 15-Jul-2015
FASEB Journal
Closer look at microorganism provides insight on carbon cycling
An Argonne/University of Tennessee research team reconstructed the crystal structure of BAP, a protein involved in the process by which marine archaea release carbon, to determine how it functioned, as well as its larger role in carbon cycling in marine sediments.

Contact: Brian Grabowski
bgrabowski@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Jul-2015
Nature Communications
Gut microbes enable coffee pest to withstand extremely toxic concentrations of caffeine
Berkeley Lab scientists discovered that coffee berry borers worldwide share 14 bacterial species in their digestive tracts that degrade and detoxify caffeine. They also found the most prevalent of these bacteria has a gene that helps break down caffeine. Their research sheds light on the ecology of the destructive bug and could lead to new ways to fight it.
US Department of Agriculture, Laboratory Directed Research and Development program at Berkeley Lab, Mexico's National Council for Science and Technology

Contact: Jon Weiner
jrweiner@lbl.gov
510-486-4014
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Jun-2015
Science
Orange is the new red
Berkeley Lab researchers discovered that a photoprotective mechanism in cyanobacteria is triggered by an unprecedented, large-scale movement from one location to another of the carotenoid pigment within the Orange Carotenoid Protein.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Jun-2015
Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry
New tool on horizon for surgeons treating cancer patients
Surgeons could know while their patients are still on the operating table if a tissue is cancerous, according to researchers from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Brigham and Women's Hospital/Harvard Medical School.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Jun-2015
ISME Journal
Automating microbial genome sequence decontamination
Single cell genomics and metagenomics have helped researchers assess environmental microbial community structure and function. To help speed up the time-consuming sequence decontamination process of microbial genomes in public databases, a US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute team has developed the first computational protocol for quick and automated removal of contaminant sequences from draft genomes and describe it in a study published online June 9, 2015, in The ISME Journal.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 13-May-2015
Blood
Starving cancer cells instead of feeding them poison
An enzyme-drug that prevents the essential nutrient asparagine from reaching cancer cells seem an effective way to kill them, but that enzyme-drug also does away with the nutrient glutamine that all cells need. Now a simulation has directed the mutation of the enzyme so that, in wet labs, it left normal cells unharmed in Petri dishes and cancer cells dead in test tubes. Lab tests are underway with mice. If successful, human tests are next.
Sandia National Laboratories' Laboratory-Directed Research and Development

Contact: Neal Singer
nsinger@sandia.gov
505-845-7078
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 12-May-2015
mBio
Using microbial communities to assess environmental contamination
A study sponsored by ENIGMA, a DOE 'Scientific Focus Area Program' based at the Berkeley Lab has found that statistical analysis of DNA from natural microbial communities can be used to accurately identify environmental contaminants and serve as quantitative geochemical biosensors.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 12-May-2015
Tests with Sandia's Davis gun aid B61-12 life extension effort
Sandia National Laboratories successfully completed a three-test series with its cannon-like Davis gun.

Contact: Sue Holmes
sholmes@sandia.gov
505-844-6362
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 14-Apr-2015
Nature Scientific Data
New ORNL, NC State and LanzaTech DNA dataset is potent, accessible tool
Scientists focused on producing biofuels more efficiently have a new powerful dataset to help them study the DNA of microbes that fuel bioconversion and other processes.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Showing releases 1-25 out of 37.

1 | 2 > >>

 

 

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