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Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

 

DOE NEWS RELEASES

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 37.

1 | 2 > >>

Public Release: 27-May-2016
Nature Microbiology
PNNL helps lead national microbiome initiative
Scientists Janet Jansson and Ljiljana Paša-Toli are part of a core group of scientists leading a national effort to understand communities of microorganisms and their role in climate science, food production and human health.

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 23-May-2016
Trends in Microbiology
A rallying call for microbiome science national data management
In a paper published online May 16, 2016, in Trends in Microbiology, researchers from the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute call for the formation of a National Microbiome Data Center to efficiently manage the datasets accumulated globally. By integrating and harnessing all available microbiome data and metadata, researchers could conduct larger-scale comparative analyses in order to address global challenges related to energy, environment, health and agriculture.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Massie S. Ballon
mlballon@lbl.gov
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 20-May-2016
Science
Chemists settle longstanding debate on how methane is made biologically
Like the poet, microbes that make methane are taking chemists on a road less traveled: Of two competing ideas for how microbes make the main component of natural gas, the winning chemical reaction involves a molecule less favored by previous research, something called a methyl radical. Reported today in the journal Science, the work is important for understanding not only how methane is made, but also how to make things from it.
Department of Energy

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 11-May-2016
Physics Review Letters
Scientists take a major leap toward a 'perfect' quantum metamaterial
Scientists have devised a way to build a 'quantum metamaterial' -- an engineered material with exotic properties not found in nature -- using ultracold atoms trapped in an artificial crystal composed of light. The theoretical work represents a step toward manipulating atoms to transmit information, perform complex simulations or function as powerful sensors.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 9-May-2016
Suicide bomb detector moves forward with Sandia engineer's help
With technical help from Sandia Labs, an Albuquerque company and a group of other small businesses are developing a way to prevent suicide attacks by detecting concealed bombs before they go off.

Contact: Nancy Salem
mnsalem@sandia.gov
505-844-2739
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 9-May-2016
Cold War Warriors: Sandia's decades in nuclear weapons
Sandia National Laboratories has produced a video about the people behind Sandia's decades of above-ground and underground nuclear weapons testing.

Contact: Sue Holmes
sholmes@sandia.gov
505-844-6362
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 4-May-2016
Three PNNL scientists receive DOE Early Career Research awards
Three scientists at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have been selected to receive 2016 Early Career Research Program research grants from the US Department of Energy. Scientists Yingge Du, Kirsten Hofmockel and James Moran will receive funding to further their studies in climate science, energy storage, and other areas important to the nation.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 7-Apr-2016
Nature Communications
Microbes take center stage in workings of 'the river's liver'
Scientists have found evidence that rising river waters deliver a feast of carbon to hungry microbes where water meets land, triggering increased activity and altering the flow of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 31-Mar-2016
Agewandte Chemie
Proving the genetic code's flexibility
Three-letter codons in a genome sequence can represent one of the 20 regularly used amino acids or stops. In the journal Angewandte Chemie International Ed., researchers from the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute and Yale University have discovered that microorganisms recognize more than one codon for selenocysteine. The finding adds credence to recent studies indicating that an organism's genetic vocabulary is not as constrained as had been long held.
DOE Office of Science, National Institute for General Medical Sciences

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 30-Mar-2016
Nature Communications
Revealing the fluctuations of flexible DNA in 3-D
Scientists have captured the first high-resolution 3-D images from individual double-helix DNA segments attached to gold nanoparticles, which could aid in the use of DNA segments as building blocks for molecular devices that function as nanoscale drug-delivery systems, markers for biological research, and components for electronic devices.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Mar-2016
Analytical Chemistry
Lighting up disease-carrying mosquitoes
Robert Meagher, a chemical engineer at Sandia National Laboratories, has developed a simple technique for simultaneously detecting RNA from West Nile and chikungunya virus in samples from mosquitoes. He is now working to add the ability to screen for Zika virus.

Contact: Patti Koning
pkoning@sandia.gov
925-294-4911
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 15-Mar-2016
PLOS ONE
Microbes may not be so adaptable to climate change
Microbes in soil -- organisms that exert enormous influence over our planet's carbon cycle -- may not be as adaptable to climate change as most scientists have presumed.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Mar-2016
PNNL gives a helping hand to small green businesses
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory will help three small businesses reduce the cost of hydropower, cut building energy use, and make adhesives from plants through new projects announced today by DOE's Small Business Vouchers program.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Franny White
franny.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 2-Mar-2016
Green Chemistry
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, March 2016
March 2016 story tips includes: 'Simulation results could lead to lower production costs for biofuels'; 'New app provides fuel economy information and more to buyers on the go'; 'ORNL supercomputer, SNS offer insight into disease'; and 'Advanced heat pump provides hot savings.'

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Feb-2016
Science
Biofuel tech straight from the farm
Nature's figured it out already, how to best break down food into fuel. Now scientists have caught up, showing that fungi found in the guts of goats, horses and sheep could help fill up your gas tank too.
US Department of Energy Office of Science, US Department of Agriculture, Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies

Contact: Eric Francavilla
eric.francavilla@pnnl.gov
509-372-4066
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Feb-2016
Nature Structural & Molecular Biology
Scientists propose 'pumpjack' mechanism for splitting and copying DNA
New close-up images of the proteins that copy DNA inside the nucleus of a cell have led a team of scientists to propose a brand new mechanism for how this molecular machinery works. The scientists studied proteins from yeast cells, which share many features with the cells of complex organisms such as humans, and could offer new insight into ways that DNA replication can go awry.
National Institutes of Health, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Brookhaven Lab Biology Department

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 4-Feb-2016
Journal of American Chemical Society
Scientists take key step toward custom-made nanoscale chemical factories
Scientists have for the first time reengineered a building block of a geometric nanocompartment that occurs naturally in bacteria to give it a new function.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 3-Feb-2016
Algae raceway paves path from lab to real-world applications
In a twist of geometry, an oval can make a line. The new algae raceway testing facility at Sandia National Laboratories may be oval in shape, but it paves a direct path between laboratory research and solving the demand for clean energy.

Contact: Patti Koning
pkoning@sandia.gov
925-294-4911
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 27-Jan-2016
Nature Communications
Uncovering hidden microbial lineages from hot springs
Although global microbial populations are orders of magnitude larger than nearly any other population in, on or around the planet, only a fraction has been identified thus far. In a Nature Communications study published Jan; 27, 2016, a team led by researchers at the DOE Joint Genome Institute, a DOE Office of Science User Facility, utilized the largest collection of metagenomic datasets to uncover a completely novel bacterial phylum that they have dubbed "Kryptonia."
United States Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
925-296-5643
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 21-Jan-2016
ACS Chemical Biology
Microbes take their vitamins -- for the good of science
Scientists have made a 'vitamin mimic' -- a molecule that looks and acts just like a natural vitamin to bacteria -- that offers a new window into the inner workings of living microbes.
U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 5-Jan-2016
Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators and Beams
Thor's hammer to crush materials at 1 million atmospheres
Thor, expected to be 40 times more efficient than Sandia's Z machine, the world's largest and most powerful pulsed-power accelerator, is expected to dramatically improve the design of similar machines aiming for high-yield fusion.
Sandia's Laboratory Directed Research and Development office, National Nuclear Security Administration's Science Campaign

Contact: Neal Singer
nsinger@sandia.gov
505-845-7078
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 22-Dec-2015
Nano Letters
Nature's masonry: The first steps in how thin protein sheets form polyhedral shells
Scientists have for the first time viewed how bacterial proteins self-assemble into thin sheets and begin to form the walls of the outer shell for nano-sized polyhedral compartments that function as specialized factories. The new insight may aid scientists who seek to tap this natural origami by designing novel compartments or using them as scaffolding for new types of nanoscale architectures, such as drug-delivery systems.
US Department of Energy, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jon Weiner
jrweiner@lbl.gov
510-486-4014
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Nov-2015
Scientific Reports
Microbes map path toward renewable energy future
In the quest for renewable fuels, scientists are taking lessons from a humble bacterium that fills our oceans and covers moist surfaces the world over. Cyanothece 51142, a type of bacteria also called blue-green algae, produces hydrogen in robust fashion, and scientists have found that it taps into an unexpected source of energy to do so.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Oct-2015
Nature
It takes a thief
The discovery by Berkeley Lab researchers of the structural basis by which bacteria are able to capture genetic information from viruses and other foreign invaders for use in their own immunological system holds promise for studying or correcting problems in human genomes.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Oct-2015
Building off known genomes to advance systems and ecosystems biology
The US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI), a DOE Office of Science User Facility, has selected 27 new projects for the 2016 Community Science Program (CSP). The full list of projects may be found at http://jgi.doe.gov/our-projects/csp-plans/fy-2016-csp-plans/. Susannah Tringe, DOE JGI User Programs Deputy, noted that these projects 'build our portfolio in key focus areas including sustainable bioenergy production, plant microbiomes and terrestrial biogeochemistry.'
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
925-296-5643
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Showing releases 1-25 out of 37.

1 | 2 > >>

 

 

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