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Showing releases 1-25 out of 28.

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Public Release: 26-Mar-2015
Science
Using magnetic fields to understand high-temperature superconductivity
Taking our understanding of quantum matter to new levels, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory are exposing high-temperature superconductors to very high magnetic fields, changing the temperature at which the materials become perfectly conducting and revealing unique properties of these substances.
National Science Foundation Division of Materials Research, DOE/Office of Science, Florida State University, State of Florida, and Los Alamos National Laboratory/LDRD Program

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Mar-2015
Science
New study shows bacteria can use magnetic particles to create a 'natural battery'
New research shows bacteria can use tiny magnetic particles to effectively create a 'natural battery.' According to work published in journal Science on March 27, the bacteria can load electrons onto and discharge electrons from microscopic particles of magnetite. This discovery holds out the potential of using this mechanism to help clean up environmental pollution, and other bioengineering applications.
Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Science Focus Area, Subsurface Biogeochemical Research program, US Department of Energy Office of Biology

Contact: Press Officer
tom@parkhill.it
39-349-238-8191
European Association of Geochemistry

Public Release: 25-Mar-2015
ACS Catalysis
Rare-earth innovation to improve nylon manufacturing
The Critical Materials Institute, a US Department of Energy Innovation Hub led by the Ames Laboratory, has created a new chemical process that makes use of the widely available rare-earth metal cerium to improve the manufacture of nylon.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Laura Millsaps
millsaps@ameslab.gov
515-294-3474
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Mar-2015
Nature Nanotechnology
ORNL-led team demonstrates desalination with nanoporous graphene membrane
Desalination is an energy-intensive process, which concerns those wanting to expand its application. Now, a team of experimentalists led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has demonstrated an energy-efficient desalination technology that uses a porous membrane made of strong, slim graphene -- a carbon honeycomb one atom thick. The results are published in the March 23 advance online issue of Nature Nanotechnology.

Contact: Dawn Levy
levyd@ornl.gov
865-576-6448
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Mar-2015
American Chemical Society 249th National Meeting & Exposition
PNNL team wins American Chemical Society award
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory wins the first-ever team award for the American Chemical Society's Catalysis Lectureship for the Advancement of Catalytic Science.

Contact: MaryAnne Wuennecke
maryanne.wuennecke@PNNL.gov
509-375-2447
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Mar-2015
Applied Physics Letters
Can perovskites and silicon team up to boost industrial solar cell efficiencies?
A collaboration between the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Stanford University may be poised to shake things up in the solar energy world. By exploring ways to create solar cells using low-cost manufacturing methods, the team has developed a novel prototype device that combines perovskite with traditional silicon solar cells into a two-terminal 'tandem' device.
US Department of Energy, Bay Area Photovoltaic Consortium

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 23-Mar-2015
Nature
UW scientists build a nanolaser using a single atomic sheet
University of Washington scientists have built a new nanometer-sized laser using a semiconductor that's only three atoms thick. It could help open the door to next-generation computing that uses light, rather than electrons, to transfer information.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Clean Energy Institute, Office of Naval Research, US Department of Energy, European Commission

Contact: Jennifer Langston
jlangst@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 23-Mar-2015
WIREs Water
Global water use may outstrip supply by mid-century
Population growth could cause demand for water to outpace supply by mid-century if current use levels continue. But it wouldn't be the first time this has happened, a Duke study finds. Using a mathematical model to analyze historic data, the researchers identified a regularly recurring pattern of time periods when demand for water outstripped supply, and shortages were resolved by technological advancements. The model projects a similar period of innovation could occur in coming decades.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Agriculture, US Department of Energy

Contact: Tim Lucas
tdlucas@duke.edu
919-613-8084
Duke University

Public Release: 23-Mar-2015
Nature Chemistry
Catching and releasing tiny molecules
Employing an ingenious microfluidic design that combines chemical and mechanical properties, a team of Harvard scientists has demonstrated a new way of detecting and extracting biomolecules from fluid mixtures. The approach requires fewer steps, uses less energy, and achieves better performance than several techniques currently in use and could lead to better technologies for medical diagnostics and chemical purification.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Paul Karoff
karoff@seas.harvard.edu
617-496-0450
Harvard University

Public Release: 23-Mar-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Discovery could yield more efficient portable electronics, solar cells
A team of chemists from the University of Wisconsin-Madison has set the stage for more efficient and sturdier portable electronic devices and possibly a new generation of solar cells based on organic materials.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Mark Ediger
ediger@chem.wisc.edu
608-262-7273
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 23-Mar-2015
Nature Chemistry
Catch-release-repeat: Study reveals novel technique for handling molecules
In research appearing in the current issue of the journal Nature Chemistry, Ximin He, Ph.D., and her colleagues describe a method capable of mimicking Nature's ability to sort, capture, transport and release molecules. The technique sets the stage for continuous and efficient manipulation of a broad range of molecules of relevance to human and environmental health.
US Department of Energy, Basic Energy Science Division, Biomolecular Materials Program

Contact: Joseph Caspermeyer
Joseph.Caspermeyer@asu.edu
Arizona State University

Public Release: 19-Mar-2015
Explosive Destruction System begins first stockpile project
This week the Explosive Destruction System (EDS), designed by Sandia National Laboratories for the US Army, began safely destroying stockpile chemical munitions. The project to destroy 560 chemical munitions at the US Army Pueblo Chemical Depot in Colorado with EDS is a prelude to a much larger operation to destroy the stockpile of 780,000 munitions containing 2,600 tons of mustard agent, stored at the Pueblo depot since the 1950s.
US Army

Contact: Patti Koning
pkoning@sandia.gov
925-294-4911
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 19-Mar-2015
Sandia showcases biology breakthroughs available for licensing
Technologies developed in Sandia National Laboratories' biosciences program could soon find their way into doctors' offices -- devices like wearable microneedles that continuously analyze electrolyte levels and a lab-on-a-disk that can test a drop of blood for 64 different diseases in minutes. At a recent seminar for potential investors and licensees, part of the Sandia Technology Showcase series, Sandia bioscientists presented eight ready-to-license technologies in three key areas: medical diagnostics, biosurveillance and therapeutics and drug discovery.

Contact: Patti Koning
pkoning@sandia.gov
925-294-4911
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 19-Mar-2015
Energy & Environmental Science
Rutgers University chemistry research holds great promise for advancing sustainable energy
Researchers have developed a compound, Ni5P4 (nickel-5 phosphide-4), that has the potential to replace platinum in two types of electrochemical cells: electrolyzers that make hydrogen by splitting water through hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) powered by electrical energy, and fuel cells that make electricity from combining hydrogen and oxygen.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research, US Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable EnergyNATCO Pharma Ltd., Rutgers University

Contact: Fred Feiner
fred@yankeepr.com
908-425-4878
Yankee Public Relations

Public Release: 18-Mar-2015
Journal of Physical Chemistry
Buckyballs become bucky-bombs
Scientists have built nanoscale explosives out of buckyballs that could one day be used to eliminate cancer cells without damaging surrounding tissue.
São Paulo Research Foundation, Brazilian National Council for Scientific and Technological Development, US Department of Energy, Russian Science Foundation

Contact: Robert Perkins
perkinsr@usc.edu
213-740-9226
University of Southern California

Public Release: 18-Mar-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Computer sims: In climatic tug of war, carbon released from thawing permafrost wins handily
There will be a lot more carbon released from thawing permafrost than the amount taken in by more Arctic vegetation, according to new computer simulations conducted by Berkeley Lab scientists.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Mar-2015
Nature Geoscience
Iron rain fell on early Earth, new Z machine data supports
Physical tests at Sandia's Z machine reveal that, at pressures rivaling those when worlds collide, iron vaporizes at far lower pressures than assumed by theoreticians, explaining why the element is distributed in Earth's mantle rather than collected at its core.
National Nuclear Security Administration

Contact: Neal Singer
nsinger@sandia.gov
505-845-7078
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 18-Mar-2015
Nucleic Acids Research
Los Alamos creates bioinformatics tool for metagenome analysis
Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed a new method for DNA analysis of microbial communities such as those found in the ocean, the soil, and our own guts.
Defense Threat Reduction Agency/Chemical and Biological Technologies-Joint Science and Technology Office

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Mar-2015
ORNL and SINAP cooperate on development of salt-cooled reactors
Representatives from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics are meeting at ORNL this week as part of an agreement between the two institutions to work together on the advancement of salt-cooled nuclear reactor technologies.

Contact: Morgan McCorkle
mccorkleml@ornl.gov
865-574-7308
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Mar-2015
Nature
A better way of scrubbing CO2
Berkeley Lab researchers have discovered a means by which the removal of carbon dioxide (CO2) from coal-fired power plants might one day be done far more efficiently and at far lower costs than today. By appending a diamine molecule to the sponge-like solid materials known as metal-organic-frameworks (MOFs), the researchers were able to more than triple the CO2-scrubbing capacity of the MOFs, while significantly reducing parasitic energy.
US Department of Energy Office of Science ARPA-E

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Mar-2015
Angewandte Chemie International Edition
Drexel University materials research could unlock potential of lithium-sulfur batteries
Drexel researchers, along with colleagues at Aix-Marseille University in France, have discovered a high performance cathode material with great promise for use in next generation lithium-sulfur batteries that could one day be used to power mobile devices and electric cars.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Britt Faulstick
bef29@drexel.edu
215-895-2617
Drexel University

Public Release: 17-Mar-2015
Nature Communications
Graphene membrane could lead to better fuel cells, water filters
An atomically thin membrane with microscopically small holes may prove to be the basis for future hydrogen fuel cells, water filtering and desalination membranes, according to a group of 15 theorists and experimentalists, including three theoretical researchers from Penn State.
US Department of Energy

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 17-Mar-2015
Nature Communications
Graphene 'gateway' discovery opens possibilities for improved energy technologies
Graphene, a strong, lightweight carbon honeycombed structure, only one atom thick, holds great promise for energy research and development. Recently scientists with the Fluid Interface Reactions, Structures, and Transport Energy Frontier Research Center, led by the US Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, revealed graphene can serve as a proton-selective permeable membrane, providing a new basis for streamlined and more efficient energy technologies such as improved fuel cells.
US Department of Energy's Office of Science

Contact: Dawn Levy
levyd@ornl.gov
865-576-6448
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Mar-2015
Scientific Reports
Los Alamos offers new insights into radiation damage evolution
Two reports from Los Alamos National Laboratory this week in the Nature journal Scientific Reports are helping crack the code of how certain materials respond in the highly damaging radiation environments within a nuclear reactor.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Mar-2015
Physical Review Letters
Symmetry matters in graphene growth
Research led by Rice University detailed the subtle interplay between carbon and substrate atoms in the growth of graphene. The results may lead to finer control over the growth of graphene films for applications.
US Department of Energy, Institute of Basic Science/Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Showing releases 1-25 out of 28.

1 | 2 > >>

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