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Showing releases 1-25 out of 32.

1 | 2 > >>

Public Release: 28-Jul-2016
Nature Communications
Keep a lid on it: Utah State University geologists probe geological carbon storage
An international collaboration of scientists' research in an area of southeastern Utah, USA, reveals insights about the feasibility of storing carbon.
Royal Dutch Shell, US Department of Energy

Contact: James "Jim" Evans
james.evans@usu.edu
435-797-1267
Utah State University

Public Release: 28-Jul-2016
Nature Communications
New material could advance superconductivity
Scientists have looked for different ways to force hydrogen into a metallic state for decades. Metallic hydrogen is a holy grail for materials science because it could be used for superconductors, materials that have no resistance to the flow of electrons, increasing efficiency many times over. For the first time researchers, led by Carnegie's Viktor Struzhkin, have experimentally produced a new class of materials blending hydrogen with sodium that could alter the superconductivity landscape.
US Department of Energy, Energy Frontier Research in Extreme Environments Center, Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, DARPA, NSFC

Contact: Viktor Struzhkin
vstruzhkin@carnegiescience.edu
Carnegie Institution for Science

Public Release: 27-Jul-2016
Battery500 consortium to spark EV innovations
The PNNL-led Battery500 consortium aims to significantly improve upon the batteries that power today's electric vehicles by more nearly tripling the specific energy in lithium batteries.
DOE/Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

Contact: Franny White
franny.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 27-Jul-2016
Ames Laboratory Ph.D. student is awarded Margaret Butler Fellowship
US Department of Energy's (DOE) Ames Laboratory and Iowa State University Ph.D. student Colleen Bertoni has been named this year's recipient of the Margaret Butler Fellowship in Computational Science.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Public Release: 27-Jul-2016
Environmental Science & Technology
All e-cigarettes emit harmful chemicals, but some emit more than others
While previous studies have found that electronic cigarettes emit toxic compounds, a new study from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has pinpointed the source of these emissions and shown how factors such as the temperature, type, and age of the device play a role in emission levels, information that could be valuable to both manufacturers and regulators seeking to minimize the health impacts of these increasingly popular devices.

Contact: Julie Chao
jhchao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Jul-2016
Angewandte Chemie International Edition
New nontoxic process promises larger ultrathin sheets of 2-D nanomaterials
Scientists has developed a novel way to produce two-dimensional nanosheets by separating bulk materials with nontoxic liquid nitrogen. The environmentally friendly process generates a 20-fold increase in surface area per sheet, which could expand the nanomaterials' commercial applications.

Contact: Sara Shoemaker
shoemakerms@ornl.gov
865-576-9219
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Jul-2016
Physical Review Letters
WSU researchers 'watch' crystal structure change in real time
Washington State University researchers have met the long-standing scientific challenge of watching a material change its crystal structure in real time.
US Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration

Contact: Stefan Turneaure
stefant@wsu.edu
509-335-1834
Washington State University

Public Release: 25-Jul-2016
Ames Laboratory scientists receive DOE award to help commercialize promising technology
US Department of Energy Ames Laboratory senior metallurgist Iver Anderson and postdoctoral research associate Emma White have been awarded a $325,000 grant from the DOE's Technology Commercialization Fund.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Jul-2016
PPPL and Princeton join high-performance software project
Princeton University and the US Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory are participating in the accelerated development of a modern high-performance computing code, or software package. Supporting this development is the Intel Parallel Computing Center Program, which provides funding to universities and laboratories to improve high-performance software capabilities for a wide range of disciplines.
Intel, Inc.

Contact: John Greenwald
jgreenwa@pppl.gov
609-243-2672
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Jul-2016
Nature Energy
New lithium-oxygen battery greatly improves energy efficiency, longevity
A new kind of lithium-oxygen battery developed at MIT, using glass nanoparticles of lithium oxides, could provide more energy, and much better stability and energy efficiency
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Karl-Lydie Jean-Baptiste
kjeanbap@mit.edu
617-253-1682
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 22-Jul-2016
Physical Review Letters
Newly discovered material property may lead to high temp superconductivity
Researchers at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Ames Laboratory have discovered an unusual property of purple bronze that may point to new ways to achieve high temperature superconductivity.

Contact: Laura Millsaps
millsaps@ameslab.gov
515-294-3474
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Jul-2016
Scientific Reports
Trees' surprising role in the boreal water cycle quantified
This is the first study to show that deciduous tree water uptake of snowmelt water represents a large but overlooked aspect of the water balance in boreal watersheds. For the boreal forest of Alaska and Western Canada, this equates to about 17-20 billion cubic meters of water per year. That is roughly equivalent to 8-10 percent of the Yukon River's annual discharge.
US Geological Survey, National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, Alaska Climate Science Center

Contact: Kristin Timm
kmtimm@alaska.edu
907-474-7064
University of Alaska Fairbanks

Public Release: 21-Jul-2016
Procedia Computer Science
An accelerated pipeline to open materials research
The Bellerophon Environment for Analysis of Materials (BEAM) is an ORNL platform that combines scientific instruments with web and data services and HPC resources through a user-friendly interface. Designed to streamline data analysis and workflow processes from experiments originating at DOE Office of Science User Facilities at ORNL, such as the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences and Spallation Neutron Source, BEAM gives materials scientists a direct pipeline to scalable computing, software support, and high-performance cloud storage services.

Contact: Jonathan Hines
hinesjd@ornl.gov
865-574-6944
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Jul-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Tide-triggered tremors give clues for earthquake prediction
The triggering of small, deep earthquakes along California's San Andreas Fault reveals depth-dependent frictional behavior that may provide insight into patterns signaling when a major quake could be on the horizon, according to a paper released this week by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Jul-2016
Mars rover's laser can now target rocks all by itself
New software is enabling ChemCam, the laser spectrometer on NASA's Curiosity Mars rover, to select rock targets autonomously -- the first time autonomous target selection is available for an instrument of this kind on any robotic planetary mission.

Contact: Laura Mullane
mullane@lanl.gov
505-667-6012
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Jul-2016
Energy & Environmental Science
Scientists harness CO2 to consolidate biofuel production process
JBEI scientists have shown that adding carbon dioxide gas during the deconstruction phase of biofuel production successfully neutralized the toxicity of ionic liquids. The technique, which is reversible, allows the liquid to be recycled, representing a major step forward in streamlining the biofuel production process.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Sarah Yang
scyang@lbl.gov
510-486-4575
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Jul-2016
Nature Materials
Self-organizing smart materials that mimic swarm behavior
An international team of researchers has successfully demonstrated the self-organizing pattern formation in active materials at microscale with computer simulations.
Korean Institute for Basic Science, US Department of Energy, Northwestern's Materials Research Center, and National Science Foundation

Contact: JooHyeon Heo
joohyeonheo@unist.ac.kr
82-522-171-223
Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology(UNIST)

Public Release: 21-Jul-2016
IDM2016, Identification of Dark Matter
World's most sensitive dark matter detector completes search
The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) dark matter experiment, which, with the help of Berkeley Lab researchers, operates beneath a mile of rock at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in the Black Hills of South Dakota, has completed its search for the missing matter of the universe. At a meeting in the UK, LUX scientific collaborators presented the results from the detector's final 20-month run.
DOE/Office of Science, National Science Foundation

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Jul-2016
Identification of Dark Matter Conference (IDM2016)
World's most sensitive dark matter detector completes search
At a conference in the United Kingdom, scientists with the LUX dark matter experiment present results from the detector's final 20-month run.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Kevin Stacey
kevin_stacey@brown.edu
401-863-3766
Brown University

Public Release: 21-Jul-2016
Science
Mines hydrology research provides 'missing link' in water modeling
Groundbreaking research on global water supply co-authored by Colorado School of Mines Hydrology Professor Reed Maxwell and alumna Laura Condon, now assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering at Syracuse University, appears in the July 22 issue of Science Magazine.
US Department of Energy, DOE/Office of Science, DOE/Office of Biological and Environmental Research, DOE/Office of Advanced Scientific Computing

Contact: Reed Maxwell
rmaxwell@mines.edu
303-384-2456
Colorado School of Mines

Public Release: 20-Jul-2016
Science Advances
Titanium + gold = new gold standard for artificial joints
Titanium is the leading material for artificial knee and hip joints because it's strong, wear-resistant and nontoxic, but an unexpected discovery by Rice University physicists shows that the gold standard for artificial joints can be improved with the addition of some actual gold.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, Texas A&M's Turbomachinery Laboratory, Florida State University Research Foundation

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 20-Jul-2016
Energy Department grants $2.5M for biorefinery waste use, renewable bioproduct study
The US Department of Energy granted $2.5 million to Texas A&M AgriLife Research to find ways to use biorefinery waste to make new, marketable products. 'It is said you can make anything but money out of lignin. Yet, that is the majority of what's left over in the biorefinery plants,' said Dr. Joshua Yuan, a biotechnologist and lead scientist on the project. 'Until we resolve this problem, biorefinery is not going to become economically viable.'
US Department of Energy

Contact: Kathleen Phillips
ka-phillips@tamu.edu
979-845-2872
Texas A&M AgriLife Communications

Public Release: 19-Jul-2016
Energy for Sustainable Development
Modern off-grid lighting could create 2 million new jobs in developing world
Many households in impoverished regions around the world are starting to shift away from inefficient and polluting fuel-based lighting -- such as candles, firewood, and kerosene lanterns -- to solar-LED systems. While this trend has tremendous environmental benefits, a new study by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has found that it spurs economic development as well, to the tune of 2 million potential new jobs.
University of California/Blum Center for Developing Economies

Contact: Julie Chao
jhchao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 19-Jul-2016
Nature Communications
Scientists create new thin material that mimics cell membranes
Materials scientists have created a new material that performs like a cell membrane found in nature. Such a material has long been sought for applications as varied as water purification and drug delivery. The material can assemble itself into a sheet thinner but stabler than a soap bubble, the researchers report July 12 in Nature Communications.
Department of Energy

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 19-Jul-2016
Physical Review Letters
Weird quantum effects stretch across hundreds of miles
MIT scientists have discovered strange quantum effects hold, even over hundreds of miles. In longest test of quantum mechanics, researchers find neutrinos, traveling over 450 miles at close to speed of light, have no single identity.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Karl-Lydie
kjeanbap@mit.edu
617-253-1682
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Showing releases 1-25 out of 32.

1 | 2 > >>

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