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Showing releases 1-21 out of 21.

Public Release: 3-May-2016
Physics of Plasmas
Scientists challenge conventional wisdom to improve predictions of bootstrap current
This article describes a new finding about the composition of bootstrap current at the edge of fusion plasmas.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: John Greenwald
jgreenwa@pppl.gov
609-243-2672
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 3-May-2016
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, May 2016
ORNL's GLIDES features advanced energy storage technology; Old tires get new life in sodium-ion batteries; Silicon carbide shows promise for reactor fuel, core structures; and a ORNL, Boeing collaboration delivers impressive results.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 2-May-2016
Nature Geoscience
A cleansing rain falls; a soil-filled mist arises
Scientists have found that rain triggers the release of a mist of particles from wet soils into the air, a finding with consequences for how scientists model our planet's climate and future. The evidence comes in the form of tiny glassy spheres, less than one-hundredth the width of a human hair, discovered in the Great Plains.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
585-709-9672
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Apr-2016
Environmental Research Letters
Insect outbreaks reduce wildfire severity
Surprising new research shows that outbreaks by the mountain pine beetle and western spruce budworm can actually reduce wildfire severity.The findings contrast sharply with popular attitudes -- and some US forest policies.
NASA, US Forest Service, USDA McIntire-Stennis Forest Research Program, US Department of Energy, National Park Service

Contact: Basil Waugh
basil.waugh@uvm.edu
802-656-8369
University of Vermont

Public Release: 27-Apr-2016
Scientific Reports
3-D printed foam outperforms traditional cellular materials in long-term stress
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory material scientists have found that 3-D printed foam works better than standard cellular materials in terms of durability and long-term mechanical performance.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 27-Apr-2016
Nature
Researchers create a better way to find out 'when'
A machine-learning algorithm created by a A research team has created an algorithm that improves the accuracy of dating past events by a factor of up to 300. The mathematical research, led by two UWM physicists, is featured in the journal Nature.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Abbas Ourmazd
ourmazd@uwm.edu
414-430-2226
University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee

Public Release: 26-Apr-2016
Nature Chemistry
NREL finds nanotube semiconductors well-suited for PV systems
Researchers at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) discovered single-walled carbon nanotube semiconductors could be favorable for photovoltaic systems because they can potentially convert sunlight to electricity or fuels without losing much energy.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Apr-2016
Science Advances
NREL theory establishes a path to high-performance 2-D semiconductor devices
Researchers at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have uncovered a way to overcome a principal obstacle in using two-dimensional (2-D) semiconductors in electronic and optoelectronic devices.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Apr-2016
Science
NREL demonstrates light-driven process for enzymatic ammonia production
A new process using light to reduce dinitrogen into ammonia, the main ingredient in chemical fertilizers could inspire development of new, more sustainable processes that eliminate the energy-intensive, lengthier processes now commonly in use.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Apr-2016
Seeing atoms and molecules in action with an electron 'eye'
A unique rapid-fire electron source -- originally built as a prototype for driving next-generation X-ray lasers -- will help scientists at Berkeley Lab study ultrafast chemical processes and changes in materials at the atomic scale. Berkeley Lab is a member of the LCLS-II project collaboration.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Apr-2016
Journal of American Chemical Society
Flipping a chemical switch helps perovskite solar cells beat the heat
A simple chemical conversion could be another step toward making cheap, efficient and stable perovskite solar cells.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Kevin Stacey
kevin_stacey@brown.edu
401-863-3766
Brown University

Public Release: 25-Apr-2016
Nature Physics
The light stuff: A brand-new way to produce electron spin currents
Publishing in Nature Physics April 25, Colorado State University scientists are the first to demonstrate using non-polarized light to produce in a metal what's called a spin voltage -- a unit of power produced from the quantum spinning of an individual electron.
US Army Research Office, US Department of Energy

Contact: Anne Ju Manning
anne.manning@colostate.edu
970-491-7099
Colorado State University

Public Release: 22-Apr-2016
Physical Review Letters
ORNL researchers discover new state of water molecule
Neutron scattering and computational modeling have revealed unique and unexpected behavior of water molecules under extreme confinement that is unmatched by any known gas, liquid or solid states.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Apr-2016
Bakery switches to propane vans
A switch to propane from diesel by a major Midwest bakery fleet showed promising results, including a significant displacement of petroleum, a drop in greenhouse gases and a fuel cost savings of 7 cents per mile, according to a study recently completed by the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory.
DOE/Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

Contact: Gregory S. Cunningham
gcunningham@anl.gov
630-252-8232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Apr-2016
Nature Communications
Cleaning up hybrid battery electrodes improves capacity and lifespan
Hybrid batteries that charge faster than conventional ones could have significantly better electrical capacity and long-term stability when prepared with a gentle-sounding way of making electrodes. Called ion soft-landing, the high-precision technique resulted in electrodes that could store a third more energy and had twice the lifespan compared to those prepared by a conventional method, the researchers report in Nature Communications.
Department of Energy

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Apr-2016
Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research
Advances in extracting uranium from seawater announced in special issue
The oceans hold more than four billion tons of uranium--enough to meet global energy needs for the next 10,000 years if only we could capture the element from seawater to fuel nuclear power plants. Major advances in this area have been published by the American Chemical Society's journal Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research. Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory led more than half of the 30 papers in the special issue.
DOE/Office of Nuclear Energy

Contact: Dawn Levy
levyd@ornl.gov
865-576-6448
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory, DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Apr-2016
Physical Review D
Numerical simulations shed new light on early universe
Innovative multidisciplinary research in nuclear and particle physics and cosmology has led to the development of a new, more accurate computer code to study the early universe. The code simulates conditions during the first few minutes of cosmological evolution to model the role of neutrinos, nuclei and other particles in shaping the early universe.
National Science Foundation at University of California San Diego, Laboratory Directed Research and Development program through the Center for Space and Earth Sciences

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Apr-2016
Science
Study shows how to make fertilizer from sunlight
A group of scientists led by the US Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden and involving the University of Colorado Boulder has developed a new, eco-friendly method to produce ammonia, the main ingredient of fertilizer, using light.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Gordana Dukovic
gordana.dukovic@colorado.edu
303-735-5297
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 21-Apr-2016
Physical Review D
Numerical simulations shed new light on early universe
Innovative multidisciplinary research in nuclear and particle physics and cosmology has led to the development of a new, more accurate computer code to study the early universe.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Apr-2016
Science
USU chemists shed new light on global energy, food supply challenge
Utah State University, NREL, University of Colorado and Montana State announce light-driven process to convert dinitrogen to ammonia.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Lance Seefeldt
lance.seefeldt@usu.edu
435-797-3964
Utah State University

Public Release: 20-Apr-2016
ACM Computer-Human Interaction conference
In gaming, player behavior reflects roles -- even when no roles are given
New research finds that player behavior in narrative role-playing games (RPGs) reflects specific character roles -- even if the game tells players nothing about the character's role. The finding is relevant to both game designers and gaming researchers who study player behavior in RPGs.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Showing releases 1-21 out of 21.

More Releases


Features

Could aluminum nitride be engineered to produce quantum bits?

Could aluminum nitride be engineered to produce quantum bits?

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Math helps scientists capture molecules in motion

Math helps scientists capture molecules in motion

Full Story >>
 


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