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Showing releases 1-24 out of 24.

Public Release: 29-Jan-2015
Science
Los Alamos develops new technique for growing high-efficiency perovskite solar cells
Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers reveal a new solution-based hot-casting technique that allows growth of highly efficient and reproducible solar cells from large-area perovskite crystals.
US Department of Energy Office of Basic Energy Sciences

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Jan-2015
Scientific Reports
Tracking fish easier, quicker, safer with new injectable device
A new acoustic fish-tracking tag is so tiny it can be injected with a syringe. It's small size enables researchers to more precisely and safely record how fish swim through dams and use that information to make dams more fish-friendly.
US Army Corps of Engineers

Contact: Franny White
franny.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Jan-2015
Science
New clues about a brain protein with high affinity for Valium
Valium, one of the best known antianxiety drugs, produces its calming effects by binding with a particular protein in the brain. But the drug has an almost equally strong affinity for a completely different protein. New studies revealing atomic level details of this secondary interaction might offer clues about Valium's side effects and point the way to more effective drugs.
National Institutes of Health, New York Structural Biology Center, DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Jan-2015
Nature Communications
Nanoscale mirrored cavities amplify, connect quantum memories
Constructing tiny 'mirrors' to trap light increases the efficiency with which photons can pick up and transmit information about electronic spin states -- which is essential for scaling up quantum memories for functional quantum computing systems and networks.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research, DOE/Office of Science, Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, NASA/Office of the Chief Technologist's Space Technology Research Fellowship, National Science Foundation

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology
Man trumps dog: Earlier assumption about BPA exposure confirmed
Coating the mouth with BPA-containing food, like soup, does not lead to higher than expected levels of BPA in blood, a new study in Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology shows. The study authors conclude that oral exposure does not create a risk for high exposures of BPA, also known as bisphenol A.
American Chemistry Council

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
Scientific Reports
ORNL researchers tune friction in ionic solids at the nanoscale
Experiments conducted by researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have uncovered a way of controlling friction on ionic surfaces at the nanoscale using electrical stimulation and ambient water vapor.

Contact: Chris Samoray
samoraycr@ornl.gov
865-241-0709
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Lawrence Livermore research finds early Mesoamericans affected by climate change
Scientists have reconstructed the past climate for the region around Cantona, a large fortified city in highland Mexico, and found the population drastically declined in the past, at least in part because of climate change.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
Science
New pathway to valleytronics
Berkeley Lab researchers have uncovered a promising new pathway to valleytronics, a potential quantum computing technology in which information is coded based on the wavelike motion of electrons moving through certain 2-D semiconductors.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
NREL scientist Brian Gregg named AAAS Fellow
Brian Gregg, a scientist at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory, has been named a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). AAAS cited Gregg for 'distinguished contributions to the field of solar photoconversion, particularly for developing a unified understanding of the photoconversion mechanism in the various cell types.'
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
NREL releases the 2013 Renewable Energy Data Book, detailing increases in installed capacity
he newly released 2013 Renewable Energy Data Book illustrates United States and global energy statistics, including renewable electricity generation, renewable energy development, clean energy investments, and technology-specific data and trends. The Data Book is produced and published annually by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory on behalf of the Energy Department's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
NREL reports examine economic trade-offs of owning versus leasing a solar photovoltaic system
Two new reports from the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) examine the economic options customers face when deciding how to finance commercial or residential solar energy systems. NREL analysts found that businesses that use low-cost financing to purchase a photovoltaic (PV) system and homeowners who use solar-specific loans can save up to 30 percent compared with consumers who lease a PV system through a conventional third-party owner.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Jan-2015
Office of Science salutes new APS fellows
Thirty-two researchers from national labs stewarded by the Office of Science have been elected as American Physical Society Fellows.

Contact: Charles Rousseaux
charles.rousseaux@science.doe.gov
DOE/US Department of Energy

Public Release: 26-Jan-2015
Nature Materials
How ionic: Scaffolding is in charge of calcium carbonate crystals
Nature packs away carbon in chalk, shells and rocks made by marine organisms that crystallize calcium carbonate. Now, research suggests that the soft, organic scaffolds in which such crystals form guide crystallization by soaking up the calcium like an 'ion sponge,' according to new work in Nature Materials. Understanding the process better may help researchers develop advanced materials for energy and environmental uses, such as for removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Jan-2015
Physical Review Letters
Researchers make magnetic graphene
Graphene has many desirable properties. Magnetism alas is not one of them. Magnetism can be induced in graphene by doping it with magnetic impurities, but this tends to disrupt graphene's electronic properties. Now a team of UC Riverside physicists has found a way to induce magnetism in graphene while also preserving graphene's electronic properties. They have accomplished this by bringing a graphene sheet very close to a magnetic insulator -- an electrical insulator with magnetic properties.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 23-Jan-2015
Nano Letters
Silver nanowires demonstrate unexpected self-healing mechanism
Northwestern University researchers find that silver nanowires can withstand strong cyclic loads, which is a key attribute needed for flexible electronics.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 23-Jan-2015
Energy & Environmental Science
Calculating the future of solar-fuel refineries
A team of University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers has developed a new tool to help engineers better gauge the overall yield, efficiency and costs associated with scaling solar-fuel production processes up into large-scale refineries.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Scott Gordon
gordon@engr.wisc.edu
608-265-8592
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 22-Jan-2015
Energy Policy
California's policies can significantly cut greenhouse gas emissions through 2030
A new model of the impact of California's existing and proposed policies on its greenhouse gas reduction goals suggests that the state is on track to meet 2020 goals, and could achieve greater emission reductions by 2030, but the state will need to do more to reach its 2050 climate goals.
California Air Resources Board

Contact: Julie Chao
jhchao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Jan-2015
Science
New research re-creates planet formation, super-earths and giant planets in the laboratory
New laser-driven compression experiments reproduce the conditions deep inside exotic super-Earths and giant planet cores, and the conditions during the violent birth of Earth-like planets, documenting the material properties that determined planets' formation and evolution processes.

Contact: Breanna Bishop
bishop33@llnl.gov
925-423-9802
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Jan-2015
ACS Nano
Self-powered intelligent keyboard could provide a new layer of security
By analyzing such parameters as the force applied by key presses and the time interval between them, a new self-powered non-mechanical intelligent keyboard could provide a stronger layer of security for computer users.
US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences

Contact: John Toon
jtoon@gatech.edu
404-894-6986
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 21-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the Royal Society A
Sequestration on shaky ground
A study finds a natural impediment to the long-term sequestration of carbon dioxide.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 21-Jan-2015
Nature
Biological safety lock for genetically modified organisms
Scientists have genetically recoded a strain of E. coli to depend on a synthetic amino acid so the bacteria can't survive outside the lab. The E. coli were also made resistant to two viruses.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Cameron
david_cameron@hms.harvard.edu
617-432-0441
Harvard Medical School

Public Release: 21-Jan-2015
Nature Communications
Self-assembled nanotextures create antireflective surface on silicon solar cells
Scientists at Brookhaven National Laboratory show that etching a nanoscale texture onto silicon creates an antireflective surface that works as well as state-of-the-art thin-film multilayer antireflective coatings for solar cells.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
ORNL model explores location of future US population growth
Researchers have developed a population distribution model that provides unprecedented county-level predictions of where people will live in the US in the coming decades.

Contact: Morgan McCorkle
mccorkleml@ornl.gov
865-574-7308
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 19-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Self-destructive effects of magnetically-doped ferromagnetic topological insulators
A new atomic-scale study of the surface properties of certain ferromagnetic topological insulators reveals that these materials exhibit extreme, unexpected, and self-destructive electronic disorder.
US Department of Energy, Institute of Basic Science of Korea

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Showing releases 1-24 out of 24.

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SLAC welcomes professor and Chemical Sciences Division director Tony Heinz

SLAC welcomes professor and Chemical Sciences Division director Tony Heinz

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