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Showing releases 1-24 out of 24.

Public Release: 30-Jun-2015
New CMI process recycles magnets from factory floor
A new recycling method developed by scientists at the Critical Materials Institute, a US Department of Energy Innovation Hub led by the Ames Laboratory, recovers valuable rare-earth magnetic material from manufacturing waste and creates useful magnets out of it. Efficient waste-recovery methods for rare-earth metals are one way to reduce demand for these limited mined resources.

Contact: Laura Millsaps
millsaps@ameslab.gov
515-294-7901
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Public Release: 30-Jun-2015
Physical Review D
New model of cosmic stickiness favors 'Big Rip' demise of universe
Vanderbilt University mathematician Marcelo Disconzi, working with physicists Robert Scherrer and Tom Kephart, has come up with a new approach to calculate cosmic viscosity and the formulation favors the 'Big Rip' scenario for the end of the universe.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: David Salisbury
david.salisbury@vanderbilt.edu
615-343-6803
Vanderbilt University

Public Release: 30-Jun-2015
Advanced Science
Carnegie Mellon chemists characterize 3-D macroporous hydrogels
Carnegie Mellon University chemists have developed two novel methods to characterize 3-D macroporous hydrogels -- materials that hold great promise for developing 'smart' responsive materials that can be used for catalysts, chemical detectors, tissue engineering scaffolds and absorbents for carbon capture.
US Department of Energy's Office of Science

Contact: Jocelyn Duffy
jhduffy@andrew.cmu.edu
412-268-2900
Carnegie Mellon University

Public Release: 30-Jun-2015
Physics of Plasmas
Scientists propose new model of mysterious barrier to fusion known as the 'density limit'
PPPL researchers have developed a detailed model of the source of a puzzling limitation on fusion reactions.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Raphael Rosen
rrosen@pppl.gov
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Jun-2015
Sandia's Z machine receives funding aimed at fusion energy
To hasten the day of low-cost, high-yield fusion reactions for energy purposes, a $3.8 million ARPA-E grant to Sandia National Labs and the U of Rochester will help smooth laser beams to increase output of a promising Sandia fusion technique called MagLIF.
DOE/Advanced Research Projects Agency Energy

Contact: Neal Singer
nsinger@sandia.gov
505-845-7078
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 29-Jun-2015
Nature Communications
X-rays and electrons join forces to map catalytic reactions in real-time
A new technique pioneered at Brookhaven Lab reveals atomic-scale changes during catalytic reactions in real time and under real operating conditions.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Justin Eure
jeure@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Jun-2015
Science
Orange is the new red
Berkeley Lab researchers discovered that a photoprotective mechanism in cyanobacteria is triggered by an unprecedented, large-scale movement from one location to another of the carotenoid pigment within the Orange Carotenoid Protein.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Jun-2015
Nature Communications
Opening a new route to photonics
Berkeley scientists have developed a technique for effectively controlling pulses of light in closely packed nanoscale waveguides, an essential requirement for ultrahigh density, ultracompact integrated photonic circuitry.
Office of Naval Research

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Jun-2015
Physical Review Letters
Helium 'balloons' offer new path to control complex materials
Researchers have developed a new method to manipulate a wide range of materials and their behavior using only a handful of helium ions.

Contact: Morgan McCorkle
mccorkleml@ornl.gov
865-574-7308
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Jun-2015
ACS Environmental Science and Technology
Argonne analysis shows increased carbon intensity from Canadian oil sands
The US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory this week released a study that shows gasoline and diesel refined from Canadian oil sands has a higher carbon impact than fuels derived from conventional domestic crude sources.
Bioenergy Technologies Office and Vehicle Technologies Office within US Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

Contact: Gregory Cunningham
gcunningham@anl.gov
630-252-8232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Jun-2015
Science
Sandia's Z machine helps solve Saturn's 2-billion-year age problem
Data from Z-machine experiments at Sandia National Laboratories may help explain why Saturn appears 2 billion years younger than its neighbor Jupiter in some computer simulations.
National Nuclear Security Administration

Contact: Neal Singer
nsinger@sandia.gov
505-845-7078
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 25-Jun-2015
Acta Crystallographica Section D
The silent partner in macromolecular crystals
On average, the mother liquor or solvent and its constituents occupy about 50 percent of a macromolecular crystal. Ordered as well as disordered solvent components need to be accurately accounted for in modelling and refinement, often with considerable complexity.
Marie Curie People Action Grant, National Institutes of Health, Phoenix Industrial Consortium, US Department of Energy

Contact: Dr. Jonathan Agbenyega
ja@iucr.org
44-124-434-2878
International Union of Crystallography

Public Release: 24-Jun-2015
Journal of Physical Oceanography
Analyzing ocean mixing reveals insight on climate
Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed a computer model that clarifies the complex processes driving ocean mixing in the vast eddies that swirl across hundreds of miles of open ocean.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Jun-2015
Angewandte Chemie International Edition
Silica 'spiky screws' could enhance industrial coatings, additive manufacturing
It took marine sponges millions of years to perfect their spike-like structures, but research mimicking these formations may soon alter how industrial coatings and 3-D printed objects are produced.
Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Laboratory Directed Research and Development program

Contact: Heidi Hill
hillhm@ornl.gov
865-241-0709
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Jun-2015
University of Illinois awarded $3.1 million to develop all-terrain rovers for high-throughput field phenotyping
The University of Illinois announced that is has been awarded a two-year, $3.1 million grant from the DOE Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy. The U. of I. will be the lead institution on the Mobile Energy-crop Phenotyping Platform, working in partnership with researchers from Cornell University and Signetron Inc.
US Department of Energy Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy

Contact: Haley Ahlers
ahlers@illinois.edu
217-265-5447
Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 23-Jun-2015
Physical Review Letters
X marks the spot: Researchers confirm novel method for controlling plasma rotation
Timothy Stoltzfus-Dueck, a physicist at the US Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, has demonstrated a novel method that scientists can use to manipulate the intrinsic - or self-generated - rotation of hot, charged plasma gas within fusion facilities called tokamaks.
The US Department of Energy's FES division

Contact: Raphael Rosen
rrosen@pppl.gov
609-243-3317
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Jun-2015
Nature Communications
Sweeping lasers snap together nanoscale geometric grids
New technique developed by Brookhaven Lab scientists to rapidly create multi-layered, self-assembled grids could transform the manufacture of high-tech coatings for anti-reflective surfaces, improved solar cells, and touchscreen electronics.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Justin Eure
jeure@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Jun-2015
Journal of Biological Chemistry
Researchers successfully target 'Achilles' heel' of MERS virus
Researchers studying the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, have found molecules that shut down the activity of an essential enzyme in the virus and could lead the way to better treatments for those infected. The team identified molecules that inhibit an enzyme essential to MERS virus replication, and also discovered a characteristic of the enzyme that is very different from other coronaviruses.
National Institutes of Health, Walther Cancer Foundation, US Department of Energy, Purdue Center for Cancer Research, Michigan Economic Development Corporation and Michigan Technology TriCorridor, Eli Lilly Company

Contact: Elizabeth K. Gardner
ekgardner@purdue.edu
765-494-2081
Purdue University

Public Release: 22-Jun-2015
Nature Materials
The secrets of secretion
Living tissues rely on their ability to package, transport and secrete liquid, where and when it's needed. Nature's secretion system is responsive, self-regulatory and intrinsically linked with its surroundings. Synthetic systems haven't been able to replicate that complexity -- until now. A new system developed at Harvard spontaneously releases only enough fluid to replace what is lost on the surface.
US Department of Energy's Basic Energy Sciences Office, Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy

Contact: Leah Burrows
lburrows@seas.harvard.edu
617-496-1351
Harvard University

Public Release: 22-Jun-2015
Applied Physics Letters
Discovery paves way for new kinds of superconducting electronics
Physicists at UC San Diego have developed a new way to control the transport of electrical currents through high-temperature superconductors -- materials discovered nearly 30 years ago that lose all resistance to electricity at commercially attainable low temperatures.
US Department of Energy, Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: Kim McDonald
kmcdonald@ucsd.edu
858-534-7572
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 19-Jun-2015
Physics Review Letters
New 'molecular movie' reveals ultrafast chemistry in motion
Scientists for the first time tracked ultrafast structural changes, captured in quadrillionths-of-a-second steps, as ring-shaped gas molecules burst open and unraveled. Ring-shaped molecules are abundant in biochemistry and also form the basis for many drug compounds. The study points the way to a wide range of real-time X-ray studies of gas-based chemical reactions that are vital to biological processes.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Jun-2015
Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry
New tool on horizon for surgeons treating cancer patients
Surgeons could know while their patients are still on the operating table if a tissue is cancerous, according to researchers from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Brigham and Women's Hospital/Harvard Medical School.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Jun-2015
Angewandte Chemie
Penn research simplifies recycling of rare-earth magnets
Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have now pioneered a process that could enable the efficient recycling of two rare-earth metals, neodymium and dysprosium. These elements comprise the small, powerful magnets that are found in many high-tech devices. In contrast to the massive and energy-intensive industrial process currently used to separate rare earths, the Penn team's method works nearly instantaneously at room temperature and uses standard laboratory equipment.
US Department of Energy's Office of Science, Research Corporation for Science Advancement

Contact: Evan Lerner
elerner@upenn.edu
215-573-6604
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 18-Jun-2015
Science
X-ray imaging reveals secrets in battery materials
In a new study, researchers explain why one particular cathode material works well at high voltages, while most other cathodes do not. The insights, published in the June 19 issue of the journal Science, could help battery developers design rechargeable lithium-ion batteries that operate at higher voltages.
US Department of Energy Office of Basic Energy Sciences, US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Liezel Labios
llabios@ucsd.edu
858-246-1124
University of California - San Diego

Showing releases 1-24 out of 24.

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