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Showing releases 1-25 out of 28.

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Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
Nature
Tiny carbon nanotube pores make big impact
A team led by the Lawrence Livermore scientists has created a new kind of ion channel based on short carbon nanotubes, which can be inserted into synthetic bilayers and live cell membranes to form tiny pores that transport water, protons, small ions and DNA.

Contact: Anne Stark
stark8@llnl.gov
925-422-9799
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
ORNL technology transfer continues strong upward trend
New methods are improving connections between private businesses and technology from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, with 101 licenses and options executed during the last three years.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Nano Energy
New solar power material converts 90 percent of captured light into heat
A multidisciplinary engineering team at the University of California, San Diego developed a new nanoparticle-based material for concentrating solar power plants designed to absorb and convert to heat more than 90 percent of the sunlight it captures. The new material can also withstand temperatures greater than 700 degrees Celsius and survive many years outdoors in spite of exposure to air and humidity.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Catherine Hockmuth
chockmuth@ucsd.edu
858-822-1359
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Creating the coldest cubic meter in the universe
As part of an international collaboration, Berkeley Lab scientists have helped create the coldest cubic meter in the universe. The cooled chamber -- roughly the size of a vending machine -- was chilled to 6 milliKelvin or -273.144 degrees Celsius in preparation for a forthcoming experiment that will study neutrinos, ghostlike particles that could hold the key to the existence of matter around us.
DOE Office of Science

Contact: Kate Greene
kgreene@lbl.gov
510-486-4404
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
2014 American Phsyical Society Division of Plasma Physics Meeting
Using radio waves to control the density in a fusion plasma
Experiments show how heating the electrons in the center of a hot fusion plasma with high power microwaves can increase turbulence, reducing the density in the inner core.
US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences

Contact: James Riordon
301-209-3238
American Physical Society

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
mBio
Boosting biogasoline production in microbes
Researchers with the Joint BioEnergy Institute have identified microbial genes that can improve both the tolerance and the production of biogasoline in engineered strains of E. coli.
U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Scientists' new analysis of plant proteins advances our understanding of photosynthesis
A world without plants would be a world without oxygen, uninhabitable for us and for many creatures. We know plants release oxygen by absorbing carbon dioxide and breaking down water using sunlight through the process of photosynthesis. However, we know little about the mechanics of how plants create oxygen during photosynthesis. A break-through that will help advance our understanding of this critical ecological process was made recently by scientists at Louisiana State University.
US Department of Energy, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Alison Satake
asatake@lsu.edu
225-578-3870
Louisiana State University

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
eLife
Emergent behavior lets bubbles 'sense' environment
Tiny, soapy bubbles can reorganize their membranes to let material flow in and out in response to the surrounding environment, according to researchers at UC Davis and Nanyang Technological University in Singapore. This behavior could be exploited in creating microbubbles that deliver drugs or other payloads inside the body -- and could help us understand how the very first living cells on Earth might have survived billions of years ago.
US Department of Energy, Singapore Ministry of Education

Contact: Andy Fell
ahfell@ucdavis.edu
530-752-4533
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
Lucky star escapes black hole with minor damage
Astronomers have gotten the closest look yet at what happens when a black hole takes a bite out of a star -- and the star lives to tell the tale.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Pam Frost Gorder
gorder.1@osu.edu
614-292-9475
Ohio State University

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Science
Berkeley Lab study reveals molecular structure of water at gold electrodes
Berkeley Lab researchers have recorded the first observations of the molecular structure of liquid water at a gold electrode under different battery charging conditions.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Rachel Berkowitz
rberkowitz@lbl.gov
510-486-7254
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
UNL researcher wins federal grant for groundbreaking solar energy project
Jinsong Huang, associate professor of mechanical and materials engineering at University of Nebraska-Lincoln, wins $1.2 million, four-year, award from US Department of Energy SunShot Initiative to refine solar cells that feature perovskite.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Jinsong Huang
jhuang2@unl.edu
402-472-2640
University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Chemical Physical Letters
New insights on carbonic acid in water
A new study by Berkeley Lab researchers provides valuable new insight into aqueous carbonic acid with important implications for both geological and biological concerns.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
UH researcher wins $1.5 million federal solar energy award
A University of Houston researcher is trying a novel approach to create high efficiency, low cost solar cells in an effort to bring the cost down to that of traditional electricity sources. Venkat Selvamanickam, M.D. Anderson Chair professor of mechanical engineering and director of the Applied Research Hub at the Texas Center for Superconductivity at UH, received a $1,499,994 grant from the U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative to produce high efficiency, inexpensive thin film photovoltaics.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Jeannie Kever
jekever@uh.edu
713-743-0778
University of Houston

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Adaptive zoom riflescope prototype has push-button magnification
Sandia National Laboratories announces a prototype of a Rapid Adaptive Zoom for Assault Rifles that would enable the user to zoom in and out at the push of a button without having to remove their eyes from their rifles. The prototype uses a patented adaptive zoom that changes the focal length of the lenses by varying their curvature.

Contact: Heather Clark
hclark@sandia.gov
505-844-3511
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
UT Austin leads $58 million effort to study potential new energy source
A research team led by The University of Texas at Austin has been awarded nearly $58 million to analyze deposits of frozen methane under the Gulf of Mexico that hold enormous potential to increase the world's energy supply.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Anton Caputo
anton.caputo@jsg.utexas.edu
512-232-9623
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Ames Laboratory scientist receives award for advancing diversity
Javier Vela, scientist with the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory and an assistant professor in chemistry at Iowa State University, has been selected as a 2014 recipient of the Stanley C. Israel Regional Award for Advancing Diversity in Chemical Sciences.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Physical Review Letters
Could I squeeze by you?
Scientists at the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory have developed deeper understanding of the ideal design for mesoporous nanoparticles used in catalytic reactions, such as hydrocarbon conversion to biofuels. The research will help determine the optimal diameter of channels within the nanoparticles to maximize catalytic output.
US Department of Energy's Office of Science

Contact: Breehan Gerleman Lucchesi
breehan@ameslab.gov
515-294-9750
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Solar energy prices see double-digit declines in 2013; Trend expected to continue
Distributed solar photovoltaic system prices dropped by 12-19 percent nationwide in 2013, according to the third edition of a jointly written report on PV pricing trends from the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. In addition, 2014 prices are expected to drop another 3-12 percent, depending on system location and market segment.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
HP supercomputer at NREL garners top honor
A supercomputer created by Hewlett-Packard and the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory that uses warm water to cool its servers, and then re-uses that water to heat its building, has been honored as one of the top technological innovations of the year by R&D Magazine.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Angewandte Chemie
Super stable garnet ceramics may be ideal for high-energy lithium batteries
Scientists have discovered exceptional properties in a garnet material that could enable development of higher-energy battery designs.

Contact: Morgan McCorkle
mccorkleml@ornl.gov
865-574-7308
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Astrophysical Journal
POLARBEAR detects B-modes in the cosmic microwave background
The POLARBEAR experiment has made the most sensitive and precise measurements yet of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background and found telling twists called B-modes in the patterns, signs that this cosmic backlight has been warped by intervening structures in the universe.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Susan Brown
sdbrown@ucsd.edu
858-246-0161
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
Supercomputers link proteins to drug side effects
New medications created by pharmaceutical companies have helped millions of Americans alleviate pain and suffering from their medical conditions. However, the drug creation process often misses many side effects that kill at least 100,000 patients a year.

Contact: Ken Ma
ma28@llnl.gov
925-423-7602
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
New high-speed transatlantic network to benefit science collaborations across the US
Scientists across the US will soon have access to new, ultra high-speed network links spanning the Atlantic Ocean, thanks to a project currently underway to extend ESnet to London, Amsterdam and Geneva.
ESnet

Contact: Kurt Riesselmann
media@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
Facetless crystals that mimic starfish shells could advance 3-D-printing pills
In a design that mimics a hard-to-duplicate texture of starfish shells, University of Michigan engineers have made rounded crystals that have no facets.
US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, National Science Foundation, Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: Nicole Casal Moore
ncmoore@umich.edu
734-647-7087
University of Michigan

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Nature Materials
Goldilocks principle wrong for particle assembly: Too hot and too cold is just right
Microscopic particles that bind under low temperatures will melt as temperatures rise to moderate levels, but re-connect under hotter conditions, a team of NYU scientists has found. Their discovery points to new ways to create 'smart materials,' cutting-edge materials that adapt to their environment by taking new forms, and to sharpen the detail of 3-D printing.
National Science Foundation, NASA, US Department of Energy

Contact: James Devitt
james.devitt@nyu.edu
212-998-6808
New York University

Showing releases 1-25 out of 28.

1 | 2 > >>

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