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Showing releases 1-17 out of 17.

Public Release: 30-Jul-2015
Argonne National Lab finds butanol is good for boats
Argonne has collaborated with Bombardier Recreational Products and the National Marine Manufacturers Association to demonstrate the effectiveness of a fuel blend with 16 percent butane. This blend would incorporate more biofuels into marine fuel without the issues caused by increasing levels of ethanol, which can cause difficulties in marine engines at high concentrations.
Vehicle Technologies Office within DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

Contact: Greg Cunningham
gcunningham@anl.gov
630-252-8232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Jul-2015
Nature Nanotechnology
Meet the high-performance single-molecule diode
Researchers from Berkeley Lab and Columbia University have created the world's highest-performance single-molecule diode. Development of a functional single-molecule diode is a major pursuit of the electronics industry.
US Department of Energy Office of Science, National Science Foundation

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Jul-2015
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics
Playing 'tag' with pollution lets scientists see who's 'it'
Using a climate model that can tag sources of soot and track where it lands, researchers have determined which areas around the Tibetan Plateau contribute the most soot -- and where. The model can also suggest the most effective way to reduce soot on the plateau, easing the amount of warming the region undergoes. The study, which appeared in Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics in June, might help policy makers target pollution reduction efforts.
US Department of Energy, National Basic Research Program of China

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Jul-2015
Nature
Tiny grains of rice hold big promise for greenhouse gas reductions, bioenergy
Rice is the staple food for more than half of the world's population, but the paddies it's grown in contributes up to 17 percent of global methane emissions -- about 100 million tons a year. Now, with the addition of a single gene, rice can be cultivated to emit virtually no methane, more starch for a richer food source and biomass for energy production, as announced in the July 30 edition of Nature and online.
The Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning, National Natural Science Foundation of China

Contact: Dawn Zimmerman
dawn.zimmerman@pnnl.gov
509-372-6618
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Jul-2015
Nature Photonics
Short wavelength plasmons observed in nanotubes
Working at the Advanced Light Source, Berkeley Lab researchers have observed 'Luttinger-liquid' plasmons in metallic single-walled nanotubes. This holds great promise for novel plasmonic and nanophotonic devices over a broad frequency range, including telecom wavelengths.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Jul-2015
Journal of Chemical Physics
New computer model could explain how simple molecules took first step toward life
Sergei Maslov, a computational biologist at the US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory and adjunct professor at Stony Brook University, and Alexei Tkachenko, a scientist at Brookhaven's Center for Functional Nanomaterials, have developed a model that explains how simple monomers could rapidly make the jump to more complex self-replicating polymers. What their model points to could have intriguing implications for the origins of life on Earth and CFN's work in engineering artificial self-assembly at the nanoscale.
DOE Office of Science

Contact: Peter Genzer
genzer@bnl.gov
631-344-3174
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Jul-2015
Red and White Fleet going green
Sandia National Laboratories recently signed a cooperative research and development agreement with Red and White Fleet to design, build and operate a high-speed hydrogen fuel cell passenger ferry and hydrogen refueling station.
United States Department of Transportation Maritime Administration

Contact: Patti Koning
pkoning@sandia.gov
925-294-4911
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 24-Jul-2015
Science Advances
Unlocking the rice immune system
JBEI and UC Davis researchers have identified a bacterial signaling molecule that triggers an immunity response in rice plants, enabling the plants to resist a devastating blight disease.

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Jul-2015
Science Advances
Rice disease-resistance discovery closes the loop for scientific integrity
UC Davis researchers here identify a protein in a crop-attacking bacterial disease, showing how the presence of the protein alerts the plant that a microbial invasion is in progress and allows the plant to launch a defensive immune response. The discovery is especially important because it corrects an earlier error, which in 2013 led this laboratory to publicly retract two important research releases.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Energy, European Molecular Biology Association, Human Frontiers Science Program, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research in India, Welch Foundation, Monsanto's Beachell-Borlaug International

Contact: Patricia Bailey
pjbailey@ucdavis.edu
530-752-9843
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 23-Jul-2015
Physical Review Letters
Young scientist discovers magnetic material unnecessary to create spin current
Research at Argonne indicates that you don't need a magnetic material to create spin current from insulators--with important implications for the field of spintronics and the development of high-speed, low-power electronics that use electron spin rather than charge to carry information.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Angela Hardin
media@anl.gov
630-252-5501
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Jul-2015
Science
Penn researchers discover new chiral property of silicon, with photonic applications
By encoding information in photons via their spin, 'photonic' computers could be orders of magnitude faster and efficient than their current-day counterparts. Likewise, encoding information in the spin of electrons, rather than just their quantity, could make 'spintronic' computers with similar advantages. University of Pennsylvania engineers and physicists have now discovered a property of silicon that combines aspects of all of these desirable qualities.
US Army Research Office, US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Evan Lerner
elerner@upenn.edu
215-573-6604
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 22-Jul-2015
Nano Letters
Smarter window materials can control light and energy
Chemical engineering professor Delia Milliron and her team have engineered two new advancements in electrochromic materials -- a highly selective cool mode and a warm mode -- not thought possible several years ago. The researchers are one step closer to delivering smart windows with a new level of energy efficiency.
US Department of Energy, Welch Foundation, NSF Graduate Fellowship Program

Contact: Sandra Zaragoza
Zaragoza@utexas.edu
512-471-2129
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 22-Jul-2015
Nature Communications
ORNL researchers make scalable arrays of 'building blocks' for ultrathin electronics
For the first time, researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have combined a novel synthesis process with commercial electron-beam lithography techniques to produce arrays of semiconductor junctions in arbitrary patterns within a single, nanometer-thick semiconductor crystal. The process transforms patterned regions of one existing, single-layer crystal into another. The two semiconductor crystals formed sharp junctions, the desired building blocks of electronics. Nature Communications reports the accomplishment.
DOE/Office of Science, National Secretariat of Higher Education, Science, Technology and Innovation of Ecuador

Contact: Dawn Levy
levyd@ornl.gov
865-576-6448
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Jul-2015
Nature
Long-sought discovery fills in missing details of cell 'switchboard'
A biomedical breakthrough in the journal Nature reveals never-before-seen details of the human body's cellular switchboard that regulates sensory and hormonal responses. The work is based on an X-ray laser experiment at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
glennr@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-4496
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Jul-2015
Science Express
Simulations lead to design of near-frictionless material
Argonne scientists used the Mira supercomputer to identify and improve a new mechanism for eliminating friction, which fed into the development of a hybrid material that exhibited superlubricity at the macroscale for the first time. ALCF researchers helped enable the groundbreaking simulations by overcoming a performance bottleneck that doubled the speed of the team's code.

Contact: Brian Grabowski
bgrabowski@anl.gov
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Jul-2015
Nature Communications
Study: Property of non-stick pans improves solar cell efficiency
Study published July 20 in Nature Communications shows that a 'non-wetting' surface, like those to create non-stick cookware, improves solar cell efficiency.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Jinsong Huang
jhuang2@unl.edu
402-472-2640
University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Public Release: 17-Jul-2015
Science Advances
Marine plankton brighten clouds over Southern Ocean
Summertime plankton blooms in the Southern Ocean play a significant role in generating brighter clouds overhead.
NASA, US Department of Energy, US Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Showing releases 1-17 out of 17.

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Robert Harrison leads new center to consolidate and showcase Brookhaven Lab's computing capabilities

Robert Harrison leads new center to consolidate and showcase Brookhaven Lab's computing capabilities

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