Einstein Science Reporting for Kids
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14-Oct-2005

Contact: Judd Ginsberg
202-872-4400
American Chemical Society

National Chemistry Week gets kids excited about chemistry

WASHINGTON, D.C. Oct 14. — The case for nationwide emphasis on strengthening America’s science and math education efforts is reflected in study after study that show American students’ test scores falling behind their counterparts around the world. This year, National Chemistry Week, Oct. 16-22, 2005, intends to interest kids in chemistry and expose economically disadvantaged students to new educational opportunities in the laboratory.

The theme, "The Joy of Toys," focuses on how chemistry plays an essential part in our everyday lives, especially the inventing and making of toys. National Chemistry Week is an annual event sponsored by the American Chemical Society, the world’s largest scientific society. Activities and events organized by American Chemical Society members, businesses and schools giving kids the opportunity to learn about chemistry through fun hands-on activities and demonstrations will be happening in cities around the country.

"National Chemistry Week is a great way to get kids excited about the sciences," said William F. Carroll, Jr., Ph.D., president of the American Chemical Society. "At a time when this country is experiencing a critical shortage of scientists, the activities and events happening around the nation as part of National Chemistry Week provide an opportunity to get kids interested in how chemistry and the sciences are part of our everyday lives."

Carroll also plans to visit 15 cities in 10 days in what the Society is calling the Extreme National Chemistry Week Tour. During the tour, Carroll will visit students across the country at schools, science fairs and other community events to highlight the importance of science education and remind students that chemistry is essential to modern life. Carroll will also raise money for Project SEED, the American Chemical Society’s nationwide program that provides summer laboratory learning experiences for economically disadvantaged students.

As an added "incentive" to local chapters of the Society to spur their fund-raising efforts for Project SEED and other American Chemical Society programs, Carroll has offered to shave his head or dye his hair for donations as high as $25,000.

"I think it’s time we scientists let our hair down, so to speak, about the fun involved in our fields of study," said Carroll.

To learn more about National Chemistry Week, Carroll’s Extreme National Chemistry Week Tour and events going on in your area, please visit www.chemistryweek.org.

About the American Chemical Society:

The American Chemical Society has more than 158,000 members at all degree levels and in all fields of chemistry. The organization provides a broad range of opportunities for peer interaction and career development, regardless of professional or scientific interests. The programs and activities conducted by ACS today are the products of a tradition of excellence in meeting member needs that dates from the Society’s founding in 1876. For more information on National Chemistry Week, visit the ACS website: www.chemistry.org.

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