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News For and About Kids

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-10 out of 111.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
Journal of American Chemical Society
Why plants don't get sunburn
Plants rely on sunlight to make their food, but they also need protection from its harmful rays, just like humans do. Recently, scientists discovered a group of molecules in plants that shields them from sun damage. Now, in an article in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, one team reports on the mechanics of how these natural plant sunscreens work.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
New frog discovered inhabiting I-95 corridor from Connecticut to North Carolina
More than a half century after claims that a new frog species existed in New York and New Jersey were dismissed, a Rutgers researcher and team of scientists have proven that the frog is living in wetlands from Connecticut to North Carolina and are naming it after the ecologist who first noticed it.

Contact: Robin Lally
rlally@ucm.rutgers.edu
732-932-0557
Rutgers University

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
Giant tortoises gain a foothold on a Galapagos Island
A population of endangered giant tortoises, which once dwindled to just over a dozen, has recovered on the Galapagos island of Espanola, a finding described as 'a true story of success and hope in conservation' by the lead author of a study published today (Oct. 28).

Contact: Claire Dunn
cbdunn@esf.edu
315-470-6650
SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
The chemistry of death (video)
It's a spooky question, but it doesn't have to be: What happens when you die? Even after you depart, there's a lot of chemistry that still goes on inside you. Reactions teamed up with mortician Caitlin Doughty, author of the new book 'Smoke Gets in your Eyes, and Other Lessons from the Crematory' to demystify death and talk about exactly what happens to the body postmortem. Check out the new episode here: http://youtu.be/BpuTLnSr_20.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Nature Geoscience
Icelandic volcano sits on massive magma hot spot
New research from University of California Davis and Aarhus University in Denmark shows that high mantle temperatures miles beneath the Earth's surface are essential for generating large amounts of magma. In fact, the scientists found that Iceland's Bardarbunga volcano lies directly above the hottest portion of the North Atlantic mantle plume.
National Science Foundation, Danish National Research Foundation

Contact: Charles Lesher
celesher@ucdavis.edu
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
GSA 2014 Annual Meeting
Kung fu stegosaur
Stegosaurs might be portrayed as lumbering plant eaters, but they were lethal fighters when necessary, according to paleontologists who have uncovered new evidence of a casualty of stegosaurian combat. The evidence is a fatal stab wound in the pubis bone of a predatory allosaur. The wound -- in the conical shape of a stegosaur tail spike -- would have required great dexterity to inflict and shows clear signs of having cut short the allosaur's life.

Contact: Christa Stratton
cstratton@geosociety.org
778-331-7625
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Sweet science: How chemistry makes your treats sweet (video)
It's National Chemistry Week, and this year's theme is the sweetest of all: candy. Whether it's ice cream, candy bars, pudding or cake, we love our sweets. But why do those treats actually taste sweet? Whether they're made with sugar or artificial sweeteners, it all comes down to chemistry. Find out more here: http://youtu.be/FaBFyEa8-eI.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
CHEST 2014
Chest
Two Michigan high school students develop screening tools to detect lung and heart disease
Two Michigan high school students, sisters Ilina and Medha Krishen, have developed screening tools using electronic stethoscopes to detect lung and heart disease. The sisters will present their findings at CHEST 2014 in Austin, Texas next week.

Contact: Kristi Bruno
kbruno@chestnet.org
773-750-9962
American College of Chest Physicians

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
These roos were 'made' for walking, study suggests of extinct enigmas
Based on a rigorous comparative analysis of kangaroo anatomy, researchers posit that the ancient family of sthenurine kangaroos that lived until 30,000 years ago likely preferred walking to hopping.
Bushnell Foundation

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 13-Oct-2014
The chemistry of pizza (video)
Whether it's a plain cheese, a deep-dish stacked with meats or a thin-crust veggie delight, there's just something about pizza that makes it delicious. There's a lot of chemistry that goes into everything from dough to sauce to toppings to, of course, cheese. There's also a very specific chemical reaction at work on every single slice, no matter what toppings you choose. Check out the latest episode here: http://youtu.be/tOkCgAwhh9U.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Showing releases 1-10 out of 111.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

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