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News For and About Kids

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1031-1040 out of 1134.

<< < 99 | 100 | 101 | 102 | 103 | 104 | 105 | 106 | 107 | 108 > >>

Public Release: 24-Mar-2005
Nature
Elephants imitate sounds as a form of social communication
Elephants learn to imitate sounds that are not typical of their species, the first known example after humans of vocal learning in a non-primate terrestrial mammal. The discovery, reported in today's Nature, further supports the idea that vocal learning is important for maintaining individual social relationships among animals that separate and reunite over time, like dolphins and whales, some birds, and bats.

Contact: Shelley Dawicki
sdawicki@whoi.edu
508-289-2270
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 24-Mar-2005
Science
Octopuses occasionally stroll around on two arms, UC Berkeley biologists report
In an eerie reprise of what it may have been like when humans first raised their arms and walked on two feet, films taken by a UC Berkeley biologist show that octopuses sometimes pick up six of their arms and scoot along on the outer ends of the other two. One Indonesian octopus resembles a tiptoeing coconut, while a second looks like algae scooting along on conveyor belts.
American Malacological Society, National Science Foundation

Contact: Robert Sanders
rsanders@berkeley.edu
510-643-6998
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 23-Mar-2005
New noble gas chemical compounds created as result of Hebrew University research
Chemical compounds consisting of noble gases combined with hydrocarbon molecules a feat previously thought to be unattainable have been created as the result of the work of researchers at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

Contact: Jerry Barach
jerryb@savion.huji.ac.il
972-258-82904
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Public Release: 23-Mar-2005
Neuron
New insight into people who 'see' colors in letters and numbers
People with a form of synesthesia in which they see colors when viewing letters and numbers really do see colors, researchers have found. What's more, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of their brains reveals that they show activation of color-perception areas. The rare condition called synesthesia was long dismissed as an oddity not worthy of scientific study. Now, however, researchers are using the condition to gain insights into the neural basis of perception.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Heidi Hardman
hhardman@cell.com
617-397-2879
Cell Press

Public Release: 22-Mar-2005
Astronomy & Astrophysics
Young and exotic stellar zoo
Using telescopes from the European Southern Observatory, astronomers have found that the cluster Westerlund 1, hidden behind a large cloud of dust and gas, is the most massive compact young cluster yet identified in the Milky Way Galaxy. It contains hundreds of very massive and most exotic stars, some shining with a brilliance of almost one million suns and some two-thousand times larger than the Sun (i.e. as large as the orbit of Saturn)!

Contact: Ignacio Negueruela
ignacio@dfists.ua.es
ESO

Public Release: 21-Mar-2005
PLOS Biology
Wolves alleviate impact of climate change on food supply, finds new UC Berkeley study
Gray wolves play a critical role in easing the effects of climate change on Yellowstone's ecosystem, according to a new UC Berkeley study. Researchers found that in the absence of wolves, shorter, milder winters lead to lower elk mortality, which is bad news for the scavengers that rely upon the elk for food. When wolves are around, however, they provide a steady supply of carrion, regardless of the climate.
US Environmental Protection Agency, James S. McDonnell Foundation

Contact: Sarah Yang
scyang@berkeley.edu
510-643-7741
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 21-Mar-2005
General Dentistry: Academy of General Dentistry
Dental erosion
Frequently consuming foods with a low pH value, such as soft drinks, fruit juices, pickles, fresh fruit and yogurt can lead to irreversible dental erosion, according to a report in the January/February issue of General Dentistry, the Academy of General Dentistry's (AGD) clinical, peer-reviewed journal.

Contact: Jennifer Starkey
jennifers@agd.org
312-440-4341
Academy of General Dentistry

Public Release: 21-Mar-2005
General Dentistry: Academy of General Dentistry
Cavity prevention tips for pre-school age children
Providing proper care and oral hygiene during preschool years can mean a lifetime of good oral health, according to a recent article in the January/February issue of General Dentistry, clinical, peer-reviewed journal of the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD), an organization of general dentists dedicated to continuing education.

Contact: Jennifer Starkey
jennifers@agd.org
312-440-4341
Academy of General Dentistry

Public Release: 21-Mar-2005
Photos show jaguar vamping for camera
He's beautiful and he knows it. A male jaguar recently acted like he was on a fashion runway in Manhattan, rather than his home in Kaa-Iya National Park in Bolivia, when it plopped down in front of a remote "camera trap" and allowed a remarkable 35 pictures to be taken over a five-and-a-half hour period. Two days earlier, the same cat languished for 90 minutes, when 19 photos were shot.

Contact: Stephen Sautner
ssautner@wcs.org
718-220-3682
Wildlife Conservation Society

Public Release: 21-Mar-2005
Recovered king of beasts returns to his home, thanks to unique operation
Samson the lion from the Hai-Kef zoo in Rishon Lezion, Israel, who had undergone a brain operation unique in the world -- at the Veterinary Teaching Hospital of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, has recuperated and has returned to his cage and to his sister, Delilah.

Contact: Jerry Barach
jerryb@savion.huji.ac.il
972-258-82904
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Showing releases 1031-1040 out of 1134.

<< < 99 | 100 | 101 | 102 | 103 | 104 | 105 | 106 | 107 | 108 > >>

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