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Funding provided by the William T. Golden Endowment Fund for Program Innovation at AAAS



 

News For and About Kids

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1071-1080 out of 1113.

<< < 103 | 104 | 105 | 106 | 107 | 108 | 109 | 110 | 111 | 112 > >>

Public Release: 21-Feb-2005
Journal of Experimental Medicine
Inflammatory molecules released by pollen trigger allergies
How do pollen particles provoke allergic reactions? A new study in the February 21 issue of The Journal of Experimental Medicine puts some of the blame on bioactive molecules that are released from pollen. These molecules bind to immune cells and cause them to launch a typical allergy-promoting immune response.

Contact: Nickey Henry
henryn@rockefeller.edu
212-327-8366
Journal of Experimental Medicine

Public Release: 19-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Secrets of whales' long-distance songs are being unveiled
Christopher Clark, director of Cornell University's Bioacoustics Research Program, listens to whales in the Atlantic using the U.S. Navy's SOSUS. From acoustical maps, Clark realizes whales have a different time scale. He discussed this at the 2005 annual AAAS meeting in Washington, D.C.

Contact: David Brand
deb27@cornell.edu
607-255-3651
Cornell University

Public Release: 19-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Astronomers measure mass of smallest black hole in a galactic nucleus
A group led by astronomers from Ohio State University and the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology have measured the mass of a unique black hole, and determined that it is the smallest found so far. Early results indicate that the black hole weighs in at less than a million times the mass of our sun - which would make it as much as 100 times smaller than others of its type.

Contact: Brad Peterson
Peterson.12@osu.edu
614-292-7886
Ohio State University

Public Release: 19-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
The secret lives of whales
Using genetics, Navy sonar, deep-sea submersibles, and toxicology, scientists are peering into the lives of whales past and present in ways never before possible. At a 3:00 PM press conference on February 19th at the annual meeting of AAAS, leading researchers will share their latest discoveries emerging from these high tech ventures, using DNA sequences, deep-sea video and sound-clips.

Contact: Jessica Brown
jbrown@seaweb.org
202-497-8375
SeaWeb

Public Release: 18-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Were bigger brains really smarter?
Bigger is smarter is better. That's the conventional wisdom for why the human brain gradually became three times larger than the ancestral brain. But bigger brains were not generally smarter brains. Archaeological records indicate our ancestors went through two periods of more than a million years each in which tool-making techniques didn't gradually improve, despite a gradual brain size increase.

Contact: Justin Reedy
jreedy@u.washington.edu
University of Washington

Public Release: 17-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Small is different
The practice of pairing computer simulations with real-world experiments is becoming more vital as scientists delve deeper into realms where the actors are measured on the nanoscale.

Contact: David Terraso
david.terraso@icpa.gatech.edu
404-385-2966
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 17-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Brain controls robot arm in monkey, University of Pittsburgh researcher reports at AAAS
Scientists have made significant strides to create a permanent artificial device that can restore deliberate mobility to patients with paralyzing injuries. The concept is that, through thought alone, a person could direct a robotic arm a neural prosthesis to reach and manipulate a desired object.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Craig Dunhoff
DunhoffCC@upmc.edu
412-647-3555
University of Pittsburgh Medical Center

Public Release: 17-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Spit, and call me in the morning
The eyes may be the window to the soul, but many scientists would say the mouth is the window to the body.

Contact: Ginger Pinholster
gpinhols@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 17-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Science
Robots walk with close-to-human efficiency
Researchers at Cornell University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Holland's Delft University of Technology have built robots that seem to closely mimic the human gait, and the Cornell robot matches human efficiency. The inspiration: simple walking toys.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Bill Steele
ws21@cornell.edu
607-255-7164
Cornell University

Public Release: 17-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Science
Teams build robots that walk like humans
Three independent research teams, including one from MIT, have built walking robots that mimic humans in terms of their gait, energy-efficiency, and control. The MIT robot also demonstrates a new learning system that allows the robot to continually adapt to the terrain as it walks.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Elizabeth Thomson
thomson@mit.edu
617-258-5402
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Showing releases 1071-1080 out of 1113.

<< < 103 | 104 | 105 | 106 | 107 | 108 | 109 | 110 | 111 | 112 > >>

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