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News For and About Kids

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1091-1100 out of 1138.

<< < 105 | 106 | 107 | 108 | 109 | 110 | 111 | 112 | 113 | 114 > >>

Public Release: 23-Feb-2005
Nature
Scientists discover why the North Pole is frozen
Ice has been building up in the Arctic for 2.7 million years. Until now, no-one has been able to prove what mechanism brought about this accumulation of ice. However, a team of international scientists led by Antoni Rosell, a researcher for the Universitat Auṭnoma de Barcelona, and Gerald H. Haug of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (Germany) has discovered the mechanism that set off the accumulation of ice.

Contact: Antoni Rosell
antoni.rosell@uab.es
34-935-813-583
Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona

Public Release: 23-Feb-2005
Polar expedition contributes to ESA's ice mission CryoSat
In a few days, a three-man scientific expedition called Pole Track is to embark upon a gruelling 1000 km trek across the frozen Arctic to collect valuable data for climate-change research. Throughout the demanding two-month expedition, the team will also take thousands of snow depth measurements in support of ESA's CryoSat mission.

Contact: Malcolm Davidson
Malcolm.Davidson@esa.int
31-715-655-957
European Space Agency

Public Release: 22-Feb-2005
ESA Mars Science Conference
Nature
Frozen sea discovered near Martian equator from 3D images of Mars Express
The discovery, by an international team of scientists led by University College London (UCL), the Open University (OU), and the Free University of Berlin, of a frozen sea close to the equator of Mars has brought the possibility of finding life on Mars one step closer.

Contact: Leslie Bell
l.bell@adm.ucl.ac.uk
44-207-679-7678
University College London

Public Release: 21-Feb-2005
PLOS Biology
The secret to longevity in tubeworms
In a study published in the freely-available online science journal PLoS Biology, modeling the interactions between deep-sea tubeworms and bacteria/archaea at hydrocarbon seeps provides a solution to their long term energy source and could help to explain the tubeworm's extreme longevity.

Contact: Paul Ocampo
pocampo@plos.org
415-624-1224
PLOS

Public Release: 21-Feb-2005
PLOS Biology
Cracking the olfactory code in bees
In the premier open-access journal PLoS Biology, a study shows that training thousands of bees uncovers the chemical characteristics they use to discriminate between odors and reveals how the perception of odor correlates with specific neural activity in their brain.

Contact: Paul Ocampo
pocampo@plos.org
415-624-1224
PLOS

Public Release: 21-Feb-2005
Journal of Experimental Medicine
Inflammatory molecules released by pollen trigger allergies
How do pollen particles provoke allergic reactions? A new study in the February 21 issue of The Journal of Experimental Medicine puts some of the blame on bioactive molecules that are released from pollen. These molecules bind to immune cells and cause them to launch a typical allergy-promoting immune response.

Contact: Nickey Henry
henryn@rockefeller.edu
212-327-8366
Journal of Experimental Medicine

Public Release: 19-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Secrets of whales' long-distance songs are being unveiled
Christopher Clark, director of Cornell University's Bioacoustics Research Program, listens to whales in the Atlantic using the U.S. Navy's SOSUS. From acoustical maps, Clark realizes whales have a different time scale. He discussed this at the 2005 annual AAAS meeting in Washington, D.C.

Contact: David Brand
deb27@cornell.edu
607-255-3651
Cornell University

Public Release: 19-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Astronomers measure mass of smallest black hole in a galactic nucleus
A group led by astronomers from Ohio State University and the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology have measured the mass of a unique black hole, and determined that it is the smallest found so far. Early results indicate that the black hole weighs in at less than a million times the mass of our sun -– which would make it as much as 100 times smaller than others of its type.

Contact: Brad Peterson
Peterson.12@osu.edu
614-292-7886
Ohio State University

Public Release: 19-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
The secret lives of whales
Using genetics, Navy sonar, deep-sea submersibles, and toxicology, scientists are peering into the lives of whales – past and present – in ways never before possible. At a 3:00 PM press conference on February 19th at the annual meeting of AAAS, leading researchers will share their latest discoveries emerging from these high tech ventures, using DNA sequences, deep-sea video and sound-clips.

Contact: Jessica Brown
jbrown@seaweb.org
202-497-8375
SeaWeb

Public Release: 18-Feb-2005
AAAS 2005 Annual Meeting
Were bigger brains really smarter?
Bigger is smarter is better. That's the conventional wisdom for why the human brain gradually became three times larger than the ancestral brain. But bigger brains were not generally smarter brains. Archaeological records indicate our ancestors went through two periods of more than a million years each in which tool-making techniques didn't gradually improve, despite a gradual brain size increase.

Contact: Justin Reedy
jreedy@u.washington.edu
University of Washington

Showing releases 1091-1100 out of 1138.

<< < 105 | 106 | 107 | 108 | 109 | 110 | 111 | 112 | 113 | 114 > >>

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